George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering

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G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering
Type Public
Established October 13, 1885[1]
Endowment $67,635,999 [2]
Chair Bill Wepfer
Academic staff
92[2]
Administrative staff
55[2]
Students 2488[2]
Undergraduates 1765[2]
Postgraduates 723[2]
Location Atlanta, Georgia, USA
33°46′37″N 84°24′02″W / 33.77694°N 84.40056°W / 33.77694; -84.40056Coordinates: 33°46′37″N 84°24′02″W / 33.77694°N 84.40056°W / 33.77694; -84.40056
Campus Urban
Website http://www.me.gatech.edu

The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering is the oldest and second largest department in the College of Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology.[3] The school offers degree programs in mechanical engineering and nuclear and radiological engineering that are accredited by ABET.[4] In its 2011 ranking list, US News & World Report placed the school ranks 6th in undergraduate mechanical engineering, 7th in graduate mechanical engineering, and 11th in undergraduate nuclear and radiological engineering.[2]

The school took its present name in 1985, honoring George W. Woodruff (class of 1917), a major benefactor.[5]

The school is the only academic institution to be recognized as a Mechanical Engineering Heritage Site by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers.[6]

Degrees offered[edit]

J. Erskine Love Jr. Manufacturing Building
125 Year Anniversary Banner

The G. W. Woodruff School offers two undergraduate degrees, five graduate degrees, and four post-graduate degrees.[7]

  • BS: Mechanical Engineering
  • BS: Nuclear and Radiological Engineering
  • MS: Mechanical Engineering
  • MS: Nuclear Engineering
  • MS: Medical Physics
  • MS: Paper Science & Engineering
  • MS: Bioengineering
  • PhD: with a Major in Mechanical Engineering
  • PhD: with a Major in Nuclear and Radiological Engineering
  • PhD: with a Major in Bioengineering
  • PhD: with a Major in Paper Science & Engineering

Facilities[edit]

The J. Erskine Love Jr. Manufacturing Building
Manufacturing Related Disciplines Complex (MRDC)

The G.W. Woodruff School occupies eight buildings, most of which located in west campus.[8]

  • Fuller E. Callaway, Jr. Manufacturing Research Center (MARC)
    • Integrated Acoustics Laboratory (anechoic-chamber)
    • Manufacturing, CAE/Design, and Automation/ Mechatronics research groups
  • Manufacturing Related Disciplines Complex (MRDC)
    • Tribology and Mechanics of Materials research groups
    • Student machine shops including "Invention Studio"[9]
  • J. Erskine Love Jr. Manufacturing Building (MRDC II)
    • Underwater acoustics tank, wind tunnel, and MEMS clean room
    • Acoustics, Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer, and MEMS research groups
  • Frank H. Neely Research Center
    • Nuclear and Radiological Engineering/Medical Physics program
    • Fission, Fusion, and Medical Physics research groups
  • Parker H. Petit Biotechnology Building
    • Bioengineering research group
  • Institute of Paper Science and Technology
  • IPST Centennial Engineering Building
  • Student Competition Center (Tin Building)
    • Houses various student competition groups, including GT motorsports, GT Off-Road (the SAE-baja team), Robojackets and Wreck Racing

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "A Walk Through Tech's History". Georgia Tech Alumni Magazine Online. Georgia Tech Alumni Association. Retrieved 2008-05-05. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "The Annual Report of the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, 2006 - 2007" (PDF) (Press release). George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. 2007. Retrieved 2008-08-08. 
  3. ^ "School Facts". George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. 2007. Retrieved 2008-08-08. 
  4. ^ "ABET". ABET. Retrieved 2008-05-29. 
  5. ^ "History". 
  6. ^ "The George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering". ASME International. Retrieved 2008-05-07. 
  7. ^ "Degrees". George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. 2007. Retrieved 2008-08-08. 
  8. ^ "Facilities". George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering. 2007. Retrieved 2008-08-08. 
  9. ^ "Georgia Tech Invention Studio". Georgia Institute of Technology. 2007. Retrieved 2013-10-30.