George Washington University School of Engineering and Applied Science

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The School of Engineering and Applied Science
SEAS George Washington University logo.png
Motto Deus Nobis Fiducia
(In God Our Trust)
Type Private
Established 1884
Parent institution
George Washington University
Dean David S. Dolling
Academic staff
200
Undergraduates 786
Postgraduates 1220
469
Address 800 22nd St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20052
Campus UrbanFoggy Bottom
Nickname SEAS, GWU SEAS
Website www.seas.gwu.edu, www.graduate.seas.gwu.edu

The School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS) at the George Washington University in Washington, D.C. is a technical school which specializes in engineering, technology, communications, and transportation. The school is located on the main campus of the George Washington University and offers both undergraduate and graduate programs.

Contents

History[edit]

In 1884, William Corcoran Eustis transformed science and engineering education in the District of Columbia when he founded the Corcoran Scientific School, now known as the George Washington University's School of Engineering and Applied Science. Corcoran was neither an engineer nor a scientist. He was a retired banker who saw the world's growing confidence in scientific discovery in the late 1800s and marveled at the impact of technological advances in his own lifetime. Not wanting the District to be without such a center of scientific discovery—at a time when the first steel frame skyscraper was constructed, when gas-powered automobiles were first being designed and built, when electric lighting was becoming commercially available—Corcoran paved the way for future discoveries and transformation by providing the founding gift for the school.

During World War II, the school’s research program was greatly aided by the Office of Scientific Research and Development, the organization that was created to provide the military with research support. In 1943, the school won the contract to manage rocket and ordnance research at the Cumberland Arsenal in Maryland. In this work, university faculty developed the recoilless anti-tank rifle (popularly known as the Bazooka), a variety of short range mortars, and a number of elements of small rockets. By the end of the war, the Engineering school was the 8th largest university contractor with the Office of Scientific Research and Development, following only MIT, Caltech, Harvard, Columbia, the University or California Berkeley, Johns Hopkins and the University of Chicago.

After the end of the second world war, the Engineering School acquired a building of its own. In 1947, Charles Hook Tompkins, an alumnus of the school, offered $22,500 to build a new facility. Tompkins had built a number of buildings for the university, including the hospital and Lisner Auditorium. Construction began in 1954 and finished two years later. In 1962, it acquired its current name, the School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS).[1]

Location[edit]

The School of Engineering and Applied Science is located on the main campus of George Washington University in the Foggy Bottom neighborhood of Washington, D.C.

Since January 2015, the School of Engineering and Applied Science has occupied in the Science and Engineering Hall on George Washington University's main campus in Foggy Bottom. Previously, the engineering school was housed in Tompkins Hall. Tompkins Hall is still used for office space for faculty as well as the computing facility.

Science & Engineering Hall[edit]

The Science and Engineering Hall is the largest academic building dedicated to these fields in Washington, D.C. The facility is 500,000 square feet and eight floors tall. It houses 140 faculty members and classrooms used by four departments: the School of Engineering and Applied Science, Columbian College of Arts & Sciences, the School of Medicine and Health Sciences, and the Milken Institute School of Public Health. The building is designed with sustainability in mind. In addition to saving 8,100 tons of carbon dioxide annually, vegetation covers more than 10,000 square feet of the roof, keeping the building cool by absorbing heat from the sun while also reducing rainwater runoff. Rain from the roof is also used to filter and flush toilets, saving roughly 850,000 gallons of water per year.[2]

The building was designed by architecture firm Ballinger and conceptualized to meet the growing research needs of engineering disciplines. After four years of construction which included demolishing the campus' largest parking deck, the building was completed in November 2014.

In May 2011, site preparation began for construction of the $300 million project. The building consists of six below-grade stories used for lab space, parking, and mechanical systems, as well as eight above-grade stories. The design of the Science and Engineering Hall combines flexible, reconfigurable spaces within common areas on each floor to promote collaborative thinking and to integrate lectures and laboratories with hands-on projects. Other key features of the building include: a vibration and particulate-free nanotechnology facility, a three story high-bay including a strong wall and floor with easy access to a street level loading dock, and a multi-use auditorium and media center for science and engineering symposia and conferences.

The building's location is just one block away from both the Foggy Bottom/GWU Metro station and The George Washington University Hospital making it a campus hub for science and medical technology.[3][4][5]

Academic Departments[edit]

Biomedical Engineering[edit]

The Department of Biomedical Engineering offers bachelor of science, master of science, and doctor of philosophy degree programs in biomedical engineering. Until 2015, these programs were administered through the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering.

Undergraduate students may choose from a number of options with the bachelor of science degree. Graduate students may select focus areas of concentration in medical imaging or medical instrumentation. Faculty and students conduct research programs across a wide array of topics, leveraging the proximity of the GW Schools of Medicine and Public Health, Children’s National Medical Center, and federal agencies to do so.

As of 2015, the department has 6 full-time faculty, 9 affiliated faculty, 178 undergraduate students, and 53 graduate students. Its annual research expenditure is around $700,000.[6]

Civil and Environmental Engineering[edit]

The department offers a bachelor of science degree in civil engineering; a five-year bachelor’s/master’s degree; master’s, doctoral, and professional degree programs in civil engineering; and several graduate certificate programs. The department has 12 full-time faculty, 109 undergraduate students, and 53 graduate students. It has an annual research expenditure of around $2.7 million.[7]

Computer Science[edit]

The Department of Computer Science offers both Bachelor of Science and Bachelor of Arts degree programs in computer science, as well as a master of science and doctor of philosophy in computer science and a master of science in Cybersecurity in Computer Science. The department also offers a graduate certificate in computer security and information assurance.

The department is one of the largest at SEAS, both in terms of faculty and students. As of 2015, the department had 18 full-time faculty members, 143 undergraduate students, and 495 graduate students. It has an annual research expenditure of $3.2 million.[8]

Electrical and Computer Engineering[edit]

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) offers bachelor of science degree programs in computer and electrical engineering. Graduate students may pursue master of science or doctor of philosophy degrees in computer or electrical engineering. The department also offers a master of science degree program in telecommunications engineering, as well as professional degree programs and graduate certificate programs.

The department has 23 full-time faculty members, 235 undergraduate students, and 248 graduate students. It has an annual research expenditure of $2.2 million.[9]

Engineering Management and Systems Engineering[edit]

The Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering offers bachelor of science, bachelor of arts, master of science, and doctor of philosophy degree programs in engineering management and systems engineering. They also offer an online doctor of engineering[10] in engineering management. The department has 15 full-time faculty, 82 undergraduate students, and 1,095 graduate students. It has an annual research expenditure of $896,000.[11]

Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering[edit]

The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering offers a Bachelor of Science degree program in mechanical engineering, a Master of Science, or Doctor of Philosophy degrees in mechanical and aerospace engineering. The department also offers professional degree programs and graduate certificate programs. It has 27 full-time faculty, 165 undergraduate students, and 121 graduate students. As of 2015, it had an annual research expenditure of $2.1 million.[12]

Research Laboratories[edit]

Biomedical Engineering Research[edit]

Biomedical engineering research at the George Washington University includes biofluid dynamics, medical imaging, cardiac electrophysiology, plasma medicine, therapeutic ultrasound, nanomedicine and tissue engineering.

Cybersecurity Research[edit]

Cybersecurity research is spread across six laboratories at the George Washington University including Dr. Zhang's laboratory which focuses on data security, Dr. Clarkson's lab which focuses on building secure computer systems, the Cyber Security Policy and Research Institute and Dr. Monteleoni's laboratory in Machine Learning.

High-Performance Computing Research[edit]

Nanotechnology Research[edit]

Robotics Research[edit]

Transportation Engineering Research[edit]

The National Crash Analysis Center is chartered with the school through Federal Highway Administration and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

Undergraduate programs[edit]

With approximately 780 students enrolled, SEAS has a variety of undergraduate programs.

Applied Science and Technology (B.S.)[edit]

Biomedical Engineering (B.S.)[edit]

  • The Bachelor of Science in Biomedical Engineering is an ABET-accredited program located in the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

Civil Engineering (B.S.)[edit]

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE) at SEAS has eleven full-time teaching and/or research faculty. The following programs are currently offered by the department as B.S. options[13] (note that all BS degrees are degrees in civil engineering, not the concentration):

  • Civil Engineering - This option is the most general of the options and has a bias toward structural engineering studies.
  • Civil Engineering with Medical Preparation Option - This is the same degree, but with more emphasis in medical school preparation. Some changes include more requirements in chemistry and organic chemistry, and introduction to circuit theory.
  • Environmental Engineering Option in Civil Engineering - The option in environmental engineering provides a strong foundation in environmental chemistry, water resources, wastewater treatment process and design, hazardous waste, and air pollution.
  • Transportation Option in Civil Engineering
  • Sustainability option in Civil Engineering
  • 5-year Bachelor's/Master's programs - The department recently enacted three options for both general CE and EE option students to complete a Master of Science degree in one additional year. A letter of intent is necessary, along with a 3.0 GPA, but application to the graduate school and GREs are not necessary. There are currently three options available:
    • B.S./M.S. in Civil Engineering with Structural Engineering Focus
    • B.S./M.S. in Civil Engineering with Environmental Engineering Focus
    • B.S./M.S. in Civil Engineering with Transportation Engineering Focus

Computer Engineering (B.S.)[edit]

Computer Science (B.S.)[edit]

Technical Tracks:

  • Computer Security and Information Assurance - for students interested in the design and implementation of secure computing infrastructures.
  • Artificial Intelligence (AI) - for students interested in artificial intelligence and its applications.
  • Computational Mathematics and Sciences
  • Computer Graphics and Digital Media - for students interested in computer graphics, visualization, animation and digital media.
  • Data Science
  • Foundations and Theory - for students interested in exploring theory or developing strong foundations, perhaps in preparation for graduate work in Computer Science.
  • Software engineering and Application Development - for students interested in the software engineering concepts and techniques required for the design and implementation of large software systems and applications.
  • Systems - for students interested in the software engineering concepts and techniques required for the design and implementation of large software systems and applications.
  • Individually designed technical track: This track is designed by you with the agreement of your advisor.It will comprise at least three courses, not necessarily with CSci designations, but the content must meet a broad technical requirement that it be closely related to the disciplines of computing.

Computer Science (B.A.)[edit]

  • Medical Preparation option - If you are interested in combining a Computer Science major with preparation for admission to a school of medicine, consider the Medical Preparation options in the B.A. and B.S. programs. In these options, you add additional natural science material to your course requirements.
  • Bioinformatics option - The emerging field of Bioinformatics combines the disciplines of Computer Science and Biochemistry, and focuses on the use of computers to characterize the molecular components of living things. If you choose this option in either the B.S. or the B.A. program, you will study a number of subjects in Biology and Chemistry, including molecular biology and genetics, and take specific coursework in Bioinformatics. Both options also meet the requirements for medical school admission, and the B.A. option in Bioinformatics meets the requirements for a second major in Biology.
  • Digital Media option - Digital Media encompasses audio, video, the World Wide Web and other technologies that can be used to create and distribute digital content. Graphics is the use of computers to create virtual worlds from which visuals can be generated and with which humans can interact. You can choose between two degree options. The Bachelor of Science (BS) concentrates on the technology. The Bachelor of Arts (BA) allows you to explore the use of digital media and computer graphics in the arts, sciences, engineering, business, medicine, and in a number of other disciplines. The expanded breadth is made available through the opportunity to take a number of related courses from other departments. Read more on the Digital Media option.
  • Biomedical Computing option - Biomedical Computing is at the intersection of health care and computer science. It involves all aspects of the analysis, management, and visualization of information in biomedical applications. The technology is based on computer science, but the field demands knowledge of the problems that need to be solved in medicine and health care.

Electrical Engineering (B.S.)[edit]

Mechanical Engineering (B.S.)[edit]

The Mechanical Engineering Program is one of the oldest SEAS programs. Most graduates easily secure their EIT designation. The specialized major options are as follows:

  • Aerospace Option in Mechanical Engineering - The Aerospace Engineering Option leads to a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering while preparing the student to work in the aerospace industry or to pursue graduate study in Aerospace Engineering. It provides a strong foundation in aerodynamics, airplane performance, propulsion, aerospace structures, orbital mechanics, spacecraft dynamics, and aircraft and spacecraft design.
  • The Biomechanical Engineering Option - The Biomechanical Engineering Option leads to a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering while preparing the student to work in the biomedical industry or to pursue graduate study in biomedical engineering. It provides a strong foundation in human anatomy and physiology, biomechanics, biomaterials, and design of biomedical devices.
  • Patent Law Option in Mechanical Engineering - The Patent Law Option leads to a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering while providing a strong foundation in fundamental principles of patent law and the influences of the US patent system on modern engineering design. A student in this option obtains background that can lead to work as a technical specialist in a patent law firm or in the patent department of an industrial employer. The option also provides excellent preparation for pursuit of a subsequent law school degree in intellectual property.
  • Robotics option in Mechanical Engineering

Systems Engineering (B.S.)[edit]

Systems Engineering is a multidisciplinary field that applies engineering techniques and mathematical methods to improve planning and decision making. By observing systems composed of people, machines, and procedures, Systems Engineers attempt to model and predict the behavior of complex systems so that they can be (re)designed to operate optimally.

Special programs[edit]

Integrated Engineering and Law Program (IELP)[edit]

This is a four-year undergraduate program at GW where the students can continue to GW's Law School and earn a J.D. degree. After Junior year, the students can intern in the US Patent Office.

Integrated Engineering and Medicine Program (IEMP)[edit]

This is an extremely competitive eight-year program which the student is in SEAS and GW's School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The student continues on to Medical school without taking the MCAT. Only two students per year are accepted.

Graduate Programs[edit]

As of the Spring 2017 semester, SEAS offers 12 master's programs, 8 doctoral programs, and 13 certificate programs. It also facilitates a number of combined B.S./M.S. programs for current GW undergraduate students, as well as accelerated master's programs with global partner institutions and special programs for working professionals in select tech and government agencies located in Washington, D.C. and Northern Virginia, such as Booz Allen Hamilton.

As of Fall 2016, there were 834 graduate students enrolled in a master's or doctorate program. In terms of gender ratio, 27% of the graduate students at SEAS are female, one of the highest in the country.[14]

Degree programs are offered in the following fields of study. They may be completed full-time or part-time on George Washington University's main campus in Foggy Bottom & off-campus sites in Arlington, Virginia:

Biomedical Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)[edit]

Offered through the Department of Biomedical Engineering, the M.S. and Ph.D. programs in Biomedical Engineering are designed to prepare students to apply engineering principles to problems in medicine and biology; to understand and model attributes of living systems; and to synthesize biomedical systems and devices. Students choose from two areas of focus: Medical imaging or medical instrumentation. Students may choose to do a master's thesis or take extra courses in lieu of a thesis.[15]

Civil and Environmental Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)[edit]

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers graduate degree and certificate programs that are designed to help students explore solutions for issues such as improving clean water access; designing intelligent transportation systems to alleviate traffic congestion; improving the crash-worthiness of cars; and designing bridges to become more resistant to earthquake.[16]

Students choose from six areas of focus:

Computer Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)[edit]

Offered through the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Engineering prepare students to learn and apply sophisticated computer architecture and integrated circuit design techniques using industry-standard computer-aided design tools. Faculty and students work together to explore solutions for photonic computing; create state-of-the-art advances in high-performance computing; and improve the reliability of cloud computing.

Each program offers up-to-date knowledge and skills in the advances of computer systems architecture and networking, as well as the rapidly growing use of superscalar microprocessors, real-time embedded systems, VLSI and ASIC design modules, digital signal processors, and networked computing platforms. The program offers a flexible schedule that includes courses in the late afternoon and evening, as well as the ability to choose a thesis or non-thesis degree option.

Students choose from two areas of focus: Computer architecture and high-performance computing or MEMS, electronics, and photonics (microelectronics and VLSI systems)[17]

Computer Science (M.S., Ph.D.)[edit]

Offered through the Department of Computer Science, the M.S., Ph.D., and certificate programs in Computer Science are designed to equip students with excellent skills at the forefront of computing. Through research and teaching, the Department contributes to computing breakthroughs that are fueling advances in medicine, communications, transportation, security, and other areas vital to society and the world. Students choose from the following areas of focus:[18]

Cybersecurity in Computer Science (M.S.)[edit]

Offered through the Department of Computer Science, the M.S. in Cybersecurity in Computer Science is designed to respond to the large and fast-growing need for technical cybersecurity experts both nationally and internationally. As the first such degree offered in the D.C. area, students acquire up-to-date knowledge and skills in cybersecurity, an increasingly important field to national security, the economy, and private citizens. Students take a combination of core courses focused on design and analysis of algorithms; computer architectures; and advanced software paradigms. These are to be combined with courses focused on security (ex. applied cryptography, computer network defense, etc.) and elective courses.[19]

Additionally, the program is federally designated as a National Center of Academic Excellence for Information Assurance Excellence by the Department of Homeland Security and National Security Agency. This recognition uniquely qualifies students for internships, scholarships, and job opportunities with the U.S. government in the cybersecurity field.

Cybersecurity Policy & Compliance (M.Eng.)[edit]

Offered through the Off-Campus division of the Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering (EMSE).

Data Analytics (M.S.)[edit]

Established in 2017, the Data Analytics program is jointly administered between the Departments of Computer Science (CS) and Engineering Management & Systems Engineering (EMSE). It is a terminal master's degree intended to provide research skills in big data for professionals seeking career advancement in corporate and government organizations.

Electrical Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)[edit]

Offered through the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), the M.S. and Ph.D. programs in Electrical Engineering are designed to help students understand and apply the principles of electrical engineering to communications, power and energy, and micro- and nano-electronics. Faculty and students research in areas such as wireless/mobile communications, micro-electro-mechanical systems, magnetics, and remote sensing.[20]

Students choose from five areas of focus:

Engineering Management (M.S., Ph.D.)[edit]

Offered through the Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering (EMSE), the M.S., Ph.D., D. Eng., and certificate programs in Engineering Management are designed to prepare technical managers who need a broad education in order to keep an organization operating efficiently and working ahead of its competitors. The Engineering Management program provides a graduate education in the latest management techniques for technical and scientific organizations.[21]

Students choose from five areas of focus:

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)[edit]

Offered through the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, the M.S., Ph.D., and certificate programs in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering prepares students for leadership careers in government and industry. Students and faculty work together to explore solutions in areas such as mobile robots for search and rescue missions; defense and environmental monitoring; smart materials; and plasma-based methods for reinforcing industrial plastics in transportation vehicles.[22]

Students choose from the following areas of focus:

Regulatory Biomedical Engineering (M.Eng.)[edit]

The Master of Engineering in Regulatory Biomedical Engineering (rBME) is an interdisciplinary program offered through the Department of Biomedical Engineering in partnership with GW's School of Medicine and Health Sciences. The new program addresses an unmet need for a graduate program to train engineers in the specific set of skills of regulatory science, biomedical innovation, and entrepreneurship. Students with training in engineering or physics and/or relevant industry/government experience study the fundamentals of biomedical engineering, global regulatory affairs, regulatory strategy in the development of devices and diagnostics, regulatory compliance, engineering patent law, medical measurements, and instrument design. In addition to coursework, students gain experience in SBIR/STTR grant applications and/or FDA Premarket Notification (510(k)) submissions for medical devices.[23]

Systems Engineering (M.S., Ph.D.)[edit]

Offered through the Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering, the M.S., Ph.D., and certificate programs in Systems Engineering provides broad knowledge of the "systems approach" for designing and managing large-scale engineering systems throughout the lifecycle. Faculty research in systems engineering include: applied enterprise systems; engineering and analysis; business and program development; critical infrastructure systems; risk assessment and management; and more.[24]

Students choose from the following areas of focus:

Telecommunications Engineering (M.S.)[edit]

Offered through the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the Master of Science (M.S.) degree in Telecommunications Engineering provides students with a foundation in the fundamentals of transmissions systems, computer networking, network architecture and protocols, and telecommunications security protocols. Students may also take courses on optical networking, wireless networking, cloud computing, and other topics relevant to the industry.[25]

Certificate Programs[edit]

Certificate programs are offered in the following areas. Each program consists of 4-6 courses to be completed within one calendar year or at the student's desired pace. Students enrolled in a master's or doctoral program may also complete a certificate in conjunction with their degree:[26]

References[edit]

  1. ^ School of Engineering and Applied Science: History http://www.seas.gwu.edu/seas-history.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  2. ^ http://seh.gwu.edu/about-science-and-engineering-hall.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  3. ^ http://www.seas.gwu.edu/science-engineering-hall
  4. ^ http://gwtoday.gwu.edu/science-and-engineering-hall-opening-scheduled-early-2015
  5. ^ http://neighborhood.gwu.edu/square-55-science-engineering-hall
  6. ^ SEAS Department of Biomedical Engineering http://www.bme.seas.gwu.edu/quick-facts.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  7. ^ SEAS Department of Civil & Environmental Engineering http://www.cee.seas.gwu.edu/quick-facts.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  8. ^ "SEAS Department of Computer Science". 
  9. ^ SEAS Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering http://www.ece.seas.gwu.edu/quick-facts.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  10. ^ "Engineering". GW Online - Find Your Program. Retrieved 16 October 2016. 
  11. ^ SEAS Department of Engineering Management and Systems Engineering http://www.emse.seas.gwu.edu/quick-facts.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  12. ^ SEAS Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering http://www.mae.seas.gwu.edu/quick-facts.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  13. ^ "Undergraduate Programs: Civil Engineering". GWU SEAS. Archived from the original on 2008-02-13. Retrieved 2007-12-19. 
  14. ^ "Graduate Student Profile". SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services. 
  15. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/biomedical-engineering.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  16. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/civil-and-environmental-engineering.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  17. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/computer-engineering.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  18. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/computer-science.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  19. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/cybersecurity-computer-science.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  20. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/electrical-engineering.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  21. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/engineering-management.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  22. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/mechanical-and-aerospace-engineering.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  23. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/regulatory-biomedical-engineering.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  24. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/systems-engineering.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  25. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/telecommunications-engineering.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  26. ^ SEAS Office of Graduate Admissions & Student Services: Certificate Programs http://graduate.seas.gwu.edu/graduate-certificates-engineering-computer-science.  Missing or empty |title= (help)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 38°53′56″N 77°02′59″W / 38.899°N 77.0498°W / 38.899; -77.0498