George Yancy

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George Yancy
Born
George Dewey Yancy

(1961-06-03) June 3, 1961 (age 57)
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, U.S.
NationalityAmerican
EducationUniversity of Pittsburgh, Yale University, New York University, Duquesne University
InstitutionsDuquesne University
Emory University
ThesisWhiteness and the return of the "Black body" (2005)
Doctoral advisorFred Evans
Main interests
critical philosophy of race, critical whiteness studies, African American philosophy, philosophy of the body
Websitewww.georgeyancy.com

George Dewey Yancy (born June 3, 1961)[1] is an American philosopher who has been a professor of philosophy at Emory University since fall 2015.[2] He is also the editor for Lexington Books' "Philosophy of Race" book series.[3] He is known for his work in critical whiteness studies, critical philosophy of race, African American philosophy, and has written, edited, or co-edited more than 20 books. He has also authored numerous scholarly articles and chapters. [4]

Education and career[edit]

Yancy received his B.A. in philosophy from the University of Pittsburgh cum laude in 1985, his M.A. in philosophy from Yale University in 1987, his M.A. in Africana studies from New York University in 2004, and his Ph.D. in philosophy from Duquesne University with distinction in 2005.[5] He later taught at Duquesne before leaving for Emory in 2015.[2]

At the University of Pittsburgh, Yancy wrote his undergraduate honors thesis on Bertrand Russell's Sense Data theory. His honors thesis was directed by prominent American philosopher and epistemologist Wilfrid Sellars. Also at Pitt, he studied Kant under Nicholas Rescher, studied with Adolf Grunbaum on Freud’s theory of religion, studied Martin Heidegger under John Haugeland, ancient Greek philosophy under Alexander Nehasmas, and modern philosophy under Annette Baier. He also had the honor of engaging in philosophical dialogue with Carl G. Hempel. While at Yale, he studied pragmatism under John E. Smith. He studied Jean-Paul Sartre and Alfred Schutz under Maurice Natanson. And studied G. W. Leibniz under Rulon Wells, and philosophy of mind under Harry Frankfurt. While at NYU, he wrote his MA thesis under Farah Jasmine Griffin, who, at the time, taught and still teaches at Columbia University.

Historically, Yancy is the first Black tenured professor of philosophy to teach at Duquesne University.

"Dear White America"[edit]

In 2015, Yancy published an article in the New York Times' philosophy column, The Stone, entitled "Dear White America",[6] which proved very controversial and resulted in his receiving large amounts of hate mail and harassment.[7] This experience later helped convince the American Philosophical Association to issue a statement denouncing bullying and harassment.[8] It also resulted in his being added to the Professor Watchlist, a website which purports to document anti-conservative college professors, in 2016.[9] Anne Leighton was also instrumental in bringing attention and support through creating a petition in support of Yancy.[10] Also, 68 philosophers and intellectuals wrote a letter in his defense.[11] In response to being placed on the Professor Watchlist, Yancy wrote an opinion piece in the New York Times entitled "I am a Dangerous Professor."[12]

Works[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly about Racism in America. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2018)
  • On Race: 34 Conversations in a Time of Crisis. (Oxford University Press, 2017)
  • Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race in America, Second Edition. Foreword by Linda Alcoff. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2017)
  • Our Black Sons Matter: Mothers Talk about Fears, Sorrows, and Hopes. Co-edited with Maria del Guadalupe Davidson and Susan Hadley. Introduction by George Yancy. Afterword by Farah Jasmine Griffin. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016). This book was a STARRED Review and was also selected as the Booklist Top 10 List of the Best Diverse Nonfiction Titles in 2017.
  • White Self-Criticality beyond Anti-Racism: How Does It Feel to Be a White Problem? Edited with introduction by George Yancy. (Lexington Books, 2015)
  • Exploring Race in Predominantly White Classrooms: Scholars of Color Reflect. (Critical Social Thought Series). Co-edited with Maria Del Guadalupe Davidson. Co-authored Introduction and additional submission of chapter. (Routledge, 2014)
  • Pursuing Trayvon Martin: Historical Contexts and Contemporary Manifestations of Racial Dynamics. Co-edited and co-authored Introduction with Janine Jones and additional submission of chapter. (Lexington Books, 2013). The first paperback edition of this book was published in 2014 along with a new preface written by the editors.
  • Look, A White! Philosophical Essays on Whiteness. Foreword by Naomi Zack. (Temple University Press, 2012)
  • Christology and Whiteness: What Would Jesus Do? Edited with Introduction by George Yancy. (Routledge, 2012)
  • Reframing the Practice of Philosophy: Bodies of Color, Bodies of Knowledge. Edited with Introduction and chapter by George Yancy. (SUNY Press, 2012)
  • Therapeutic Uses of Rap and Hip-Hop. Co-edited and co-authored Introduction with Susan Hadley. (Routledge, 2011)
  • The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers on the Whiteness of Philosophy. Foreword by Sandra Harding. Edited with Introduction by George Yancy. (Lexington Books, 2010). The Center Must Not Hold: White Women Philosophers on the Whiteness of Philosophy was reprinted in paperback edition in 2011.
  • Critical Perspectives on bell hooks. Co-edited with Maria Del Guadalupe Davidson. Co-authored Introduction and additional submission of chapter. (Routledge, 2009)
  • Black Bodies, White Gazes: The Continuing Significance of Race. Foreword by Linda Alcoff. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2008). Received Honorable Mention from the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights.
  • Philosophy in Multiple Voices. Edited with Introduction by George Yancy. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2007). Winner of the CHOICE Outstanding Academic Book Award for 2009.
  • Narrative Identities: Psychologists Engaged in Self-Construction. Co-edited with Susan Hadley. Preface by Yancy and Hadley. (Jessica Kingsley Press, 2005)
  • White on White/Black on Black. Foreword by Cornel West. Edited with Introduction and chapter by George Yancy. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2005). Winner of the CHOICE Outstanding Academic Book Award for 2005.
  • What White Looks Like: African American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Edited with Introduction and chapter by George Yancy. (Routledge, 2004)
  • The Philosophical I: Personal Reflections on Life in Philosophy. Edited with Introduction and chapter by George Yancy. (Rowman & Littlefield, 2002)
  • Cornel West: A Critical Reader. Afterword by Cornel West. Edited with Introduction and chapter by George Yancy. (Blackwell Publishers, 2001)
  • African-American Philosophers: 17 Conversations. Edited with Introduction, and all interviews conducted by George Yancy. (Routledge, 1998). Winner of the CHOICE Outstanding Academic Book Award for 1999.

The New York Times (The Stone) articles and interviews by George Yancy[edit]

  • Yancy, G. "#IAm Sexist" in The Stone (New York Times), October 24, 2018.
  • Yancy, G. (With Anita L. Allen). "The Pain and Promise of Black Women in Philosophy," in The Stone (New York Times), June 18, 2018.
  • Yancy, G. "Should I Give Up on White People?" in The Stone (New York Times), April 16, 2018.
  • Yancy, G. (with Drucilla Cornell) "James Bond is a Wimp," in The Stone (New York Times), February 26, 2018.
  • Yancy, G. "Will America Choose King's Dream or Trump's Nightmare?" in The Stone (New York Times), January 15, 2018.
  • Yancy, G. (with David Kyuman Kim). "An Open Letter of Love to Kim Jong-un" in The Stone (New York Times), November 13, 2017.
  • Yancy, G. (with Noam Chomsky) "Noam Chomsky: On Trump and the State Of the Union," in The Stone (New York Times), July 5, 2017.
  • Yancy, G. "Is Your God Dead?" in The Stone (New York Times), June 19, 2017.
  • Yancy, G. "It's Black History Month. Look in the Mirror," in The Stone (New York Times), February 9, 2017.
  • Yancy, G. "I am a Dangerous Professor," in The Stone (New York Times), November 30, 2016
  • Yancy, G. (with Brad Evans) "The Perils of being a Black Philosopher," in The Stone (New York Times), April 18, 2016.
  • Yancy, G. "Dear White America," in The Stone (New York Times), December 24, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with bell hooks) "Buddhism, the Beats and Loving Blackness," in The Stone (New York Times), December 10, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Seyla Benhabib) "Whom Does Philosophy Speak?," in The Stone (New York Times), October 9, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with David Kim) "The Invisible Asian," in The Stone (New York Times), October 8, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Paul Gilroy) "What 'Black Lives' Means in Britain," in The Stone (New York Times), October 1, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Cornel West) "Cornel West: The Fire of a New Generation" in The Stone (New York Times), August 19, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Joe Feagin) "American Racism in the 'White Frame'" in The Stone (New York Times), July 27, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with John D. Caputo) "Looking 'White' in the Face" in The Stone (New York Times), July 2, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Peter Singer) "Peter Singer: On Racism, Animal Rights and Human Rights" in The Stone (New York Times), May 27, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Molefi Kete Asante) "Molefi Kete Asante: Why Afrocentricity?" in The Stone (The New York Times), April 6, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Anthony Appiah). "Kwame Anthony Appiah: The Complexities of Black Folk," in The Stone (The New York Times), April 16, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Emily Lee) "Asian, American, Woman, Philosopher," in The Stone (The New York Times), April 6, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Noam Chomsky) "Noam Chomsky on the Roots of American Racism," in The Stone (The New York Times), March 18, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Falguni A. Sheth). "How Liberalism and Racism are Wed" in The Stone (The New York Times), February 27, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (With Linda Alcoff), "Philosophy's Lost Body and Soul" in The Stone (The New York Times), February 4, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (With Judith Butler). "What's Wrong With 'All Lives Matter?'" in The Stone (The New York Times), January 12, 2015.
  • Yancy, G. (with Joy James). "Black Lives: Between Grief and Action" in The Stone (The New York Times), December 22, 2014.
  • Yancy, G. (with Shannon Sullivan). "White Anxiety and the Futility of Black Hope" in The Stone (The New York Times), December 5, 2014.
  • Yancy, G. (with Charles Mills). "Lost in Rawlsland" in The Stone (The New York Times), November 16, 2014.
  • Yancy, G. (with Naomi Zack). "What ‘White Privilege' really means" in The Stone (The New York Times), November 5, 2014.
  • Yancy, G. "Walking While Black in the White Gaze'" in The Stone (The New York Times), September 1, 2013.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Yancy, George". Library of Congress. Retrieved 2018-05-20.
  2. ^ a b W., Justin. "George Yancy from Duquesne to Emory". Daily Nous.
  3. ^ "George Yancy". Department of Philosophy Website. Emory University.
  4. ^ Willett, Paige (February 20, 2017). "Race Relations And The Philosophy Of Whiteness Are Important Subjects for Doctor George Yancy". KGOU.
  5. ^ "George Yancy". Duquesne University Faculty. Duquesne University.
  6. ^ Yancy, George (December 24, 2015). "Dear White America". Opinionator. Retrieved July 13, 2017.
  7. ^ Kupka-Moore, Marshall (February 2, 2016). "The Emory professor behind Dear White America explains his side". The Tab.
  8. ^ Jaschik, Scott (February 15, 2016). "Against Bullying". Inside Higher Education.
  9. ^ Flaherty, Colleen (December 6, 2016). "Reclaiming the Watch List". Inside Higher Education.
  10. ^ Leighton, Anne. "Support George Yancy". Change.org. Missing or empty |url= (help)
  11. ^ "In Defense of a Colleague Facing Racist Attacks". Inside Higher Ed. 2016-02-26.
  12. ^ Yancy, George (November 30, 2016). "I am a Dangerous Professor". Opinionator.

External links[edit]