Georgia State Route 2

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State Route 2 marker

State Route 2
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length: 165.0 mi[2] (265.5 km)
Existed: 1919[1] – present
Tourist
routes:
Cohutta–Chattahoochee Scenic Byway
Major junctions
West end: SR 193 in Flintstone
 
East end: US 76 at the South Carolina state line
Location
Counties: Walker, Catoosa, Whitfield, Murray, Gilmer, Fannin, Union, Towns, Rabun
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
SR 1 SR 3

State Route 2 (SR 2) is a 165-mile-long (266 km) east-west state highway in the far northern part of the U.S. state of Georgia. The highway serves southern suburbs of Chattanooga, Tennessee, as well as much of the mountainous area in the northern part of the state. It traverses the counties of Walker, Catoosa, Whitfield, Murray, Gilmer, Fannin, Union, Towns, and Rabun. It connects Flintstone, in the northwestern part of the state, with the South Carolina state line southeast of Clayton in the northern part and the northeastern part of the state. It also travels through Fort Oglethorpe, Ringgold, Ellijay, Blue Ridge, Blairsville, and Hiawassee. Parts of the highway in the Whitfield and Murray county area are designated as the Cohutta–Chattahoochee Scenic Byway.[3]

Route description[edit]

SR 2 begins at an intersection with SR 193 in the community of Flintstone, the route travels east along Battlefield Parkway, with a brief concurrency with US 27/SR 1. It then has an interchange with Interstate 75 (I-75), before reaching US 41/US 76/SR 3. After a brief concurrency with US 41/US 76/SR 3 through Ringgold, SR 2 splits off in Stone Church and continues east. After crossing the Conasauga River, the route has another brief concurrency with SR 225, then continues a short distance east to US 411/SR 61 in the community of Cisco. SR 2 travels concurrent with US 411/SR 61 to Chatsworth. In Chatsworth, SR 2 travels concurrent with SR 52 to the east past Fort Mountain to Ellijay. Here, SR 2 begins a lengthy concurrency with US 76 to the South Carolina state line. US 76/SR 2/SR 5/SR 515, travel to the northeast to Blue Ridge. In town, SR 5 departs to the north, while US 76/SR 2/SR 515 continue east to Blairsville. East of Blairsville, the concurrency arcs to the north, then east, around Brasstown Bald. West of Hiawassee, SR 515 departs to the north, and US 76/SR 2 are joined by SR 17, then SR 75 in Hiawassee. East of Hiawassee, SR 17/SR 75 depart to the south, and US 76/SR 2 continue east through a series of switchbacks over the Eastern Continental Divide to Clayton. At this point, US 76/SR 2 have a brief concurrency with US 23/US 441/SR 15. The two highway curve to the southeast and meet the eastern terminus of SR 2, the South Carolina state line. Here, US 76 continues toward Westminster.[4]

The only portion of SR 2 that are included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, mobility, and defense is the Chatsworth–Clayton segment.[5]

History[edit]

1920s[edit]

SR 2 was established at least as early as 1919. Then, it started at an intersection with SR 1 in LaFayette. It traveled east-northeast to Dalton. It then followed its current path to nearby Chatsworth. It then took a more southerly route to Ellijay. It also followed its current path to Clayton. It is unclear as to whether it traversed the Clayton–South Carolina path at this time.[1] By the end of 1921, the LaFayette–Dalton and Chatsworth–Ellijay segments were removed from the state highway. Traffic had to travel south-southeast to Fairmount. There, it traveled to the east-northeast, concurrent with SR 53 to a point northwest of Talking Rock. At that point, SR 53 ended and SR 2 began a concurrency with SR 5 north-northeast through Ellijay to Blue Ridge. Also, it was proposed to be extended northeast from Clayton to Pine Mountain.[1][6] In 1926, the eastern part of the Dalton–Chatsworth segment and nearly the entire Hiawassee–Clayton segment had a "sand clay or top soil" surface. The rest of this segment had a "completed semi hard surface". Almost the entire western half of the Blue RidgeBlairsville segment had a "completed hard surface", with the center of this segment having a completed semi hard surface. Nearly the entire Blairsville–Young Harris segment was under construction.[6][7] In 1929, a different path between LaFayette and Dalton was re-added to the highway. It followed the current path of SR 136 and SR 201 east-southeast from LaFayette to Villanow and north-northeast to Dalton. About two-thirds of the LaFayette–Villanow segment had a completed semi hard surface. Also, The Clayton–Pine Mountain segment was cancelled.[7][8]

1930s[edit]

In the middle of 1930, the eastern part of the Dalton–Chatsworth segment had a completed hard surface. The Chatsworth–Ellijay segment was re-added to the highway. The western half of the Blairsville–Young Harris segment had a completed semi hard surface, with the eastern half, as well as the Young Harris–Hiawassee segment completed. The eastern part of the Hiawassee–Clayton segment was under construction.[8][9] By the end of the year, the entire LaFayette–Villanow segment had a completed semi hard surface. US 41 and SR 3 began a concurrency with SR 2 within Dalton. The center part of the Blue Ridge–Blairsville segment had a sand clay or top soil surface. The eastern part of this segment was under construction. The entire Blairsville–Hiawassee segment was completed.[9][10] The next year, the part of the highway just north-northeast of Villanow was indicated as "completed grading, no surface course". The rest of the Villanow–Dalton segment was under construction. The western part of the Dalton–Chatsworth segment had a completed semi hard surface. The entire Chatsworth–Ellijay segment was also under construction. The western half of the Ellijay–Blue Ridge segment had a sand clay or top soil surface, with the rest of this segment completed.[10][11] By August 1932, the eastern part of the Blue Ridge–Blairsville segment had a completed semi hard surface. The entire Hiawassee–Clayton segment had a sand clay or top soil surface. Also the Clayton–South Carolina segment was built, and was signed as SR 2.[12][13] By the end of 1933, the entire Dalton–Chatsworth segment was completed.[14][15] In the third quarter of 1934, SR 2 was extended west-northwest to Davis Crossroads. The entire LaFayette–Dalton segment has a completed semi hard surface.[16][17] By the end of the year, US 76 was designated along SR 2 from Chatsworth to Clayton. It was unclear if the Clayton–South Carolina segment was part of US 76 at this time, though.[17][18] By October 1937, the entire Union County section of the Blue Ridge–Blairsville segment was completed.[19][20] Before the year ended, SR 2 was extended slightly farther to the northwest from its western terminus.[20][21] Late in 1938, the entire part northwest of LaFayette and the entire Chatsworth–Ellijay segment was "completed grading, not surfaced". By the middle of 1939, the highway was extended northwest just a little more, to an intersection with SR 157 near Ascalon.[22][23] By the end of 1939, the roadway was extended northwest to Trenton, but it was unclear whether it was part of SR 2.[24][25]

1940s[edit]

By April 1940, the entire Trenton area segment was completed grading, not surfaced. The entire Ellijay–Blue Ridge segment, as well as nearly all of the Rabun County part of the Hiawassee–Clayton segment, was completed.[25][26] Parts of the roadway on either side of the SR 157 intersection, the entire Whitfield County section of the LaFayette–Dalton segment, the entire Blue Ridge–Blairsville segment, and nearly the entire Rabun County section of the Hiawassee–Clayton segment, were completed.[26][27] By 1941 started, SR 157 was shifted farther to the east, with the former alignment being redesignated as SR 170. From just northwest of this intersection southeast to the new intersection with SR 157.[27][28] A little later in the year, SR 2 was completed slightly to the southeast of the SR 157 intersection.[28][29] By the end of 1946, US 76 was designated along the Clayton–South Carolina segment.[30][31] By April 1949, SR 2 was shifted to an entirely different alignment west of Blue Ridge. The entire segment from Trenton to Villanow was redesignated as SR 143. The entire Villanow–Dalton segment was redesignated as SR 201. SR 2's new western terminus was at US 27/SR 1 in Chickamauga Park. It traveled through Ringgold and intersected SR 71 in Varnell. It went northeast to US 411/SR 61 in Cisco. It took a winding path through the Chattahoochee National Forest and intersected SR 5 northwest of Blue Ridge. The two highways traveled concurrently into Blue Ridge, where it resumed its former alignment. The entire Chickamauga Park–Ringgold segment, and the SR 5 concurrency, was hard surfaced. From Ringgold to the Whitfield–Murray county line, and from east of Cisco to northwest of Blue Ridge, the highway had a sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth surface. From the Whitfield–Murray county line to east of Cisco, the highway was machine graded and maintained.[32][33]

1950s to 1980s[edit]

By the end of 1953, nearly all of the Ringgold–Varnell segment of SR 2 was hard surfaced.[34][35] By the middle of 1957, a short section northeast of Blue Ridge was paved.[36][37] By the middle of 1960, about half of the Varnell–Cisco segment was paved. Between 1963 and 1966, the entire section from Higdon to SR 5 was paved.[38][39] In 1970, the entire segment west of Gregory was paved.[40][41] By 1974, the segment between Cisco and Higdon was impassable due to rock slides.[42][43] In 1986, SR 2 was re-routed south-southwest along US 411/SR 61 from Cisco to Chatsworth, where it began a concurrency with US 76/SR 52. US 76/SR 2/SR 52 traveled to the east and southeast into Ellijay, where SR 52 departed the concurrency. US 76/SR 2 turned left onto SR 5. They entered Blue Ridge. Here, SR 5 departed the concurrency, and US 76/SR 2 headed east as previously.[44][45] In 1989, SR 515 was designated along US 76/SR 2 as it travels today.[46][47]

On March 25, 1958, the bridge over the Cartecay River at the city limits of East Ellijay was designated the A. Charles Soule Bridge.[48]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[2] km Destinations Notes
Walker Flintstone 0.0 0.0 SR 193 – LaFayette, Chattanooga Western terminus
Catoosa Fort Oglethorpe 3.3 5.3 US 27 south / SR 1 south – LaFayette, Chickamauga Interchange; west end of US 27/SR 1 concurrency
4.6 7.4 US 27 north (Lafayette Road) / SR 1 north – Rossville, Chattanooga East end of US 27/SR 1 concurrency
Ringgold 11.0 17.7 I‑75 (SR 401 / Larry McDonald Memorial Highway) – Atlanta, Chattanooga I-75 exit 350
12.3 19.8 US 41 north / US 76 west / SR 3 north – Chattanooga West end of US 41/US 76/SR 3 concurrency
12.9 20.8 SR 151 south (Old Alabama Road) – Trion West end of SR 151 concurrency
13.8 22.2
US 41 Truck south (Tennessee Street) / US 76 Truck east / SR 151 north – Ooltewah
East end of SR 151 concurrency; northern terminus of US 41 Truck; western terminus of US 76 Truck

US 41 Truck north (Evitt Street) / US 76 Truck west / SR 151 Spur north
Southern terminus of US 41 Truck; eastern terminus of US 76 Truck; southern terminus of SR 151 Spur
16.2 26.1 US 41 south / US 76 east / SR 3 south – Dalton East end of US 41/US 76/SR 3 concurrency
Whitfield Varnell 22.6 36.4 SR 201 south – Tunnel Hill Northern terminus of SR 201
24.4 39.3 SR 71 (Cleveland Highway) – Dalton, Cohutta
Murray 34.8 56.0 SR 225 south – Calhoun, Chatsworth West end of SR 225 concurrency
35.9 57.8 SR 225 north East end of SR 225 concurrency
Cisco 38.2 61.5 US 411 north / SR 61 north – Knoxville West end of US 411/SR 61 concurrency
Eton 47.2 76.0 SR 286 west (Coffey Road) Eastern terminus of SR 286
Chatsworth 49.9 80.3 US 76 west / SR 52 west (G.I. Maddox Parkway) – Dalton West end of US 76/SR 52 concurrency
51.4 82.7 US 76 east / US 411 south / SR 52 Alt. east / SR 61 south – Fairmount East end of US 76 and US 411/SR 61 concurrencies
Gilmer East Ellijay 75.9 122.1 SR 52 south (N. Main Street) East end of SR 52 concurrency
US 76 west / SR 282 west (Industrial Boulevard) – North Georgia Medical Center West end of US 76 and SR 282 concurrencies
Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest 78.1 125.7 SR 5 south / SR 515 south West end of SR 5 and SR 515 concurrencies
Fannin Blue Ridge 91.9 147.9 SR 5 north (Blue Ridge Drive) – McCaysville, Ocoee River, Epworth, Fannin Regional Hospital East end of SR 5 concurrency; A.L. Stepp Interchange
Morganton 95.9 154.3 SR 60 – Mineral Bluff, Dahlonega, Murphy NC
Union 107 172 SR 325 north (Nottely Dam Road) – Nottely Dam Southern terminus of SR 325
Blairsville 114 183 US 19 north / US 129 north / SR 11 north (Murphy Highway) – Murphy N.C. West end of US 19/US 129/SR 11 concurrency; former northern terminus of US 129 Truck/SR 11 Truck
Pat Haralson Memorial Drive – Union County Courthouse, Blairsville, Union General Hospital Interchange
Chattahoochee-Oconee National Forest US 19 south / US 129 south / SR 11 south (Glenn Gooch Bypass) – Cleveland, Brasstown Bald East end of US 19/US 129/SR 11 concurrency; former east end of US 129 Truck/SR 11 Truck concurrency
Towns Young Harris 122 196 SR 66 west (Murphy Street) Eastern terminus of SR 66
126 203 SR 17 north / SR 515 north (Hayesville Road) – Hayesville NC East end of SR 515 concurrency; west end of SR 17 concurrency
Friendship 128 206 SR 288 east (Sunnyside Road) – Lake Chatuge Recreation Area Western terminus of SR 288
Hiawassee 130 210 SR 75 north (Bell Creek Road) – Franklin NC West end of SR 75 concurrency
J. Truman Holmes Bridge Crossing over Hiawassee River
133 214 SR 288 west (Sunnyside Road) Eastern terminus of SR 288
133 214 SR 17 south / SR 75 south (Unicoi Turnpike) – Helen, Brasstown Bald, Gainesville, Cleveland East end of SR 17 and SR 75 concurrencies
Rabun 146 235 SR 197 south – Clarkesville, Helen Northern terminus of SR 197
Georgia State Patrol Trooper Bobby Staton Memorial Bridge Crossing of Lake Burton
Clayton 157 253 US 23 / US 441 / SR 15 north – Dillard, Franklin N.C. West end of US 23/US 441/SR 15 concurrency
US 23 / US 441 / SR 15 south – Clarkesville East end of US 23/US 441/SR 15 concurrency
South Carolina state line 165 266 Bridge Crossing over the Chattooga River; South Carolina state line; eastern terminus of SR 2
US 76 east (Lookout Mountain Scenic Highway) – Westminster East end of US 76 concurrency; US 76 continues into South Carolina.
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Google (January 1, 2017). "Overview map of SR 2" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 1, 2017. 
  3. ^ Cohutta–Chattahoochee Scenic Byway (PDF) (Map). Georgia Department of Transportation Office of Planning. Retrieved August 13, 2015. 
  4. ^ Google (April 22, 2012). "Map of Clayton, Georgia with the route of State Route 2 overlaid" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved April 22, 2012. 
  5. ^ National Highway System: Georgia (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved January 1, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1926). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  8. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1929). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  9. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  10. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (November 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  11. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  12. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (May 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  13. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (August 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  14. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (November 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  15. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (December 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 15, 2017. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  16. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April–May 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  17. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  18. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1935). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  19. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  20. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  21. ^ Georgia State Highway Board (January 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  22. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (September 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  23. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  24. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  25. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  26. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  27. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  28. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  29. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  30. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  31. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  32. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1948). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  (Corrected to February 28, 1948.)
  33. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1949). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  (Corrected to April 1, 1949.)
  34. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1953). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  (Corrected to September 1, 1953.)
  35. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1953). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  (Corrected to September 1, 1953.)
  36. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1955). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1955.)
  37. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1957). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  (Corrected to July 1, 1957.)
  38. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1963). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 13, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1963.)
  39. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1966). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  40. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1970). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  41. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1971). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  42. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1973). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  43. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1974). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1974–75 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  44. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1986). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1986–87 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  45. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1987). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1987–88 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  46. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1989). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1989–90 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  47. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1990). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1990–91 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 13, 2017. 
  48. ^ "A. CHARLES SOULE BRIDGE— DESIGNATED." (PDF). ACTS AND RESOLUTIONS. Georgia General Assembly. Retrieved June 24, 2014. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google

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