Georgia State Route 21

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

State Route 21 marker

State Route 21
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length: 84.4 mi[2] (135.8 km)
Existed: 1919[1] – present
Major junctions
South end: SR 204 in Savannah
 
North end: US 25 / SR 121 north of Millen
Location
Counties: Chatham, Effingham, Screven, Jenkins
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
SR 20 SR 22

State Route 21 (SR 21) is a 84.4-mile-long (135.8 km) state highway that travels southeast-to-northwest through portions of Chatham, Effingham, Screven, and Jenkins counties in the eastern part of the U.S. state of Georgia. The highway connects the Savannah and Millen areas, via Garden City, Port Wentworth, Rincon, Springfield, and Sylvania.

SR 21 formerly had its northern terminus at the South Carolina state line in Augusta. It traveled on the current path of US 25/SR 121 from Millen to Augusta. In the city, it used the path of SR 28 (Broad Street) and the Georgia segment of US 25 Bus.

The highway is part of the Savannah River Parkway which is being considered for inclusion into Interstate 3 (I-3), a future Interstate Highway proposed to connect the Savannah and Knoxville, Tennessee areas.

Route description[edit]

SR 21 begins at an intersection with SR 204 (Abercorn Street) in Savannah. The highway travels to the west-northwest, becoming a freeway, and gains the designation of Interstate 516 (I-516) and the unsigned SR 421. The highways travel concurrently to the west-northwest, then curve to the north-northeast at the interchange with Veterans Parkway. At exit 3, US 17/SR 25 join the freeway from the southwest, and US 80/SR 26 join the freeway from the northeast. Continuing to the north-northeast, the highways have an interchange with I-16, at which point, US 17 departs to the east-southeast, concurrent with I-16. At exit 7, US 80/SR 26 depart to the west-northwest, and the highways turn to the west-northwest. After SR 25 departs, I-516/SR 421 ends, and SR 21 continues its northwestward route. In Port Wentworth, SR 30 joins the highway; north of their interchange with I-95, SR 30 departs to the west-southwest.

SR 21 continues north, leaving Chatham County and entering Effingham County. The highway travels through Rincon and Springfield, then continues northwest, through rural parts of the county, and continues into Screven County. After a brief concurrency with US 301/SR 73 Loop around the western side of Sylvania, SR 21 continues west into Jenkins County. East of Millen, SR 21 turns to the northwest at its intersection with SR 67, then arcs to the northeast of Millen to meet its northern terminus at US 25/SR 121.

Tom Triplett Parkway[edit]

The Tom Triplett Parkway is a section of SR 21 located in Port Wentworth on the west side of the Savannah metropolitan area.[3]

It stretches from the Chatham–Effingham county line (roughly the Lake Cherie Road intersection) to the Garden City–Port Wentworth city line (roughly the SR 307 intersection).

In 2000, the Georgia General Assembly passed a resolution[3] to designate this portion of SR 21 in honor of Tom Triplett,[4] a Democrat who served as Mayor of Port Wentworth and as a State Representative for 18 years. Tom Triplett died in 2006, at 71 years of age.

National Highway System[edit]

All of SR 21, except for the Millen Bypass, a bypass around the northeast part of Millen, is included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[5][6]

History[edit]

1920s and 1930s[edit]

SR 21 was established at least as early as 1919 on its current path from Savannah to Millen, and traveled north-northwest to end in Waynesboro.[1] By the end of September 1921, it was extended north-northeast to Augusta, replacing a segment of SR 12.[1][7] By October 1926, US 17/SR 25 was designated on the southern two-thirds of the Chatham County portion of SR 21, but there was no indication if SR 21 was truncated off this segment.[7][8] In 1930, US 25 was designated on SR 21 from Millen to Augusta.[9][10] About seven years later, SR 119 was designated on the path of SR 21 southeast of Springfield.[11][12] At the end of the year, the 1938 GDOT map showed more detail for the highway; it was the first GDOT map that had inset maps for Savannah and Augusta. It showed that US 17/SR 21/SR 25 traveled west-northwest from Savannah on Bay Street. It also showed that US 25/SR 21 entered Augusta on Savannah Road, then began a concurrency with US 1/US 78/SR 4/SR 10/SR 12 (Milledgeville Road), traveled northeast on Twiggs Street, and curved to the north-northeast on 7th Street. At SR 28 (Broad Street), US 1/US 78/SR 4/SR 10/SR 12 traveled east-southeast on it, while US 25/SR 21 traveled west-northwest on it. They turned to the north-northeast on 13th Street to the South Carolina state line. Here, SR 21 ended, and US 25 continued to the north.[13][14]

1940s and 1950s[edit]

Between the beginning of 1945 and November 1946, US 80/SR 26 was shifted onto a concurrency with US 17/SR 21/SR 25 from Savannah to southeast of Industrial City Gardens (Garden City's former name). US 17/SR 25 was shifted off of SR 21 farther to the south-southeast, in Industrial City Gardens. The entire length of SR 21 was hard surfaced.[15][16] Between April 1949 and August 1950, the path of SR 119 southeast of Springfield was shifted northward, off of the concurrency with SR 21. Its former path that was not concurrent with SR 21 was redesignated as SR 275.[17][18] By the beginning of 1952, SR 17 was extended on the path of US 17/US 80/SR 21/SR 25 in the Savannah area.[18][19] Between June 1954 and June 1955, DeRenne Avenue in Savannah was established. A southern bypass of the main part of Augusta was built from US 78/US 278/SR 10/SR 12 on the northeastern edge of Camp Gordon to an interchange with US 25/SR 21 and the northern terminus of SR 56. It was under construction from there east, northeast, and north-northeast to the intersection of Gwinnett Street and 5th Street. US 1/US 78/SR 4/SR 10/SR 12 split off of US 25/SR 21 just north of Gwinnett Street.[20][21] Between June 1955 and July 1957, US 1/US 25/US 78/SR 4/SR 10, with US 278's then-recent extension, was rerouted onto the previous bypass, which was completed on its previous path and extended a very short distance. SR 4 and SR 21 traveled on their previous alignments.[21][22]

1960s[edit]

Between July 1957 and June 1960, US 25 was rerouted in downtown Augusta. It traveled east-southeast on SR 28 (Broad Street) to the bypass of the city. Its former path was redesignated as US 25 Bus.; however, there was no indication if SR 21 ended at the 7th Street–Broad Street intersection, traveled concurrent with US 25 Bus./SR 28 (west-northwest on Broad Street), or traveled concurrent with US 25/SR 28 (east-southeast on Broad Street).[22][23] By June 1963, SR 26 Loop was designated on DeRenne Avenue and proposed to travel west-northwest and then north-northeast to US 17/US 80/SR 17/SR 21/SR 26 just northwest of Savannah. The path of SR 121 was extended onto US 25/SR 21 from Millen to Augusta.[23][24] By the beginning of 1966, SR 26 Loop was proposed to be extended from the La Roche Avenue intersection north-northeast to US 80/SR 26 west-northwest of Thunderbolt. Skidaway Road was established from US 80/SR 26 west-northwest of Thunderbolt south-southwest to DeRenne Avenue. SR 17 was truncated to what is now its northern intersection with US 80/SR 26/SR 30 northwest of Bloomingdale. A western bypass of Sylvania, designated as SR 73 Loop, was proposed from US 301/SR 73 south-southwest of the city to another intersection with those highways north-northwest of it. SR 121 was extended onto the bypass of downtown Augusta, which was then listed as Gordon Highway. SR 21 was indicated to travel on US 25 Bus./SR 28 (Broad Street) and split with it onto 13th Street.[24][25] In 1966, SR 26 Loop was extended from Montgomery Street to Liberty Parkway and was under construction from there to Augusta Avenue.[25][26] The next year, its segment from Liberty Parkway to I-16 was indicated to "open Spring '68".[26][27] In 1968, this segment opened.[27][28] The next year, SR 26 Loop was opened from I-16 to Augusta Avenue.[28][29]

1970s[edit]

In 1970, SR 26 Loop was proposed to be extended from Augusta Avenue north-northeast and west-northwest to US 17/US 80/SR 21/SR 25/SR 26. SR 73 Loop in the Sylvania area was completed, with US 301 designated on it. The former path of US 301 through the city, on SR 73, was redesignated as US 301 Bus.[29][30] In 1977, SR 26 Loop was completed on its previous proposed extension.[31][32] The next year, the entire completed portion of SR 26 Loop, except for the easternmost portion between La Roche Avenue and Skidaway Road, was redesignated as a southeastern extension of SR 21. The portion between La Roche Avenue and Skidaway Road was just decommissioned. SR 21 was also designated on Skidaway Road from US 80/SR 26 west-northwest of Thunderbolt south-southwest to DeRenne Avenue and continued its previous route.[32][33]

1980s[edit]

In 1981, the northern terminus of SR 21 was truncated to the main part of Millen.[34][35] In 1985, the southern terminus of SR 21 was truncated to its current point at SR 204 (Abercorn Street). I-516 was designated on SR 21 from Montgomery Street in Savannah to Garden City. US 17/SR 25 was routed onto the path of I-516/SR 21 from the Ogeechee Road to the Bay Street interchanges. The former path on Bay Street was redesignated as part of US 17 Alt./SR 25 Alt.[36][37] In 1988, an unnumbered road was built from SR 21 southeast of Sylvania to US 301/SR 73 at the southern terminus of SR 73 Loop south-southwest of the city.[38][39] The next year, a northeastern bypass of Millen, designated as SR 828, was proposed from SR 21 east of the city to US 25/SR 121 north-northwest of it.[39][40]

1990s to 2010s[edit]

In 1990, the unnumbered road south of Sylvania was designated as SR 829.[40][41] In 1993, a western bypass of Springfield, designated as SR 863, was proposed from SR 21 south-southeast of the city to another intersection with SR 21 northwest of it. The path of SR 21 in the Sylvania area was shifted south-southwest, replacing the path of SR 829 and then routed on US 301/SR 73 Loop. Its former path was redesignated as SR 21 Bus.[42][43] In 1995, the path of SR 21 in the Millen area was shifted northward, replacing the path of SR 828. The path of US 17 in Savannah, north of I-16, was shifted eastward, off of I-516/US 80/SR 21/SR 25/SR 26 and onto I-16 and SR 404 Spur. This rerouting replaced the path of US 17 Alt.[44][45] In 1997, the path of SR 21 in the Springfield area was shifted westward, replacing the path of SR 863.[46][47] In 2010, the path of SR 21 in the Newington area was shifted southwestward; its former path was redesignated as SR 21 Bus.[48][49]

Future[edit]

Interstate 3
Location: Savannah, GeorgiaKnoxville, Tennessee

SR 21, as part of the Savannah River Parkway, is proposed to become part of I-3.

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi km Destinations Notes
Chatham Savannah 0.0 0.0 SR 204 (Abercorn Street) Southern terminus
Mildred Street Eastern terminus of I-516; south end of I-516 concurrency
see I-516
Garden City SR 25 north to US 80 (Bay Street) – Garden City Western terminus of I-516; I-516 exit 8; north end of I-516 and SR 25 concurrencies
SR 21 Spur east (Brampton Road) Western terminus of SR 21 Spur
Port Wentworth SR 307 (Bourne Avenue)
SR 30 east (Bonny Bridge Road) – Savannah National Wildlife Refuge South end of SR 30 concurrency
Jimmy DeLoach Parkway Interchange; Sonny Dixon Interchange
I‑95 (SR 405) – Brunswick, Florence, Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport I-95 exit 109
SR 30 west (Piedmont Avenue) to SR 17 North end of SR 30 concurrency
Effingham SR 275 north (Ebenezer Road) – Ebenezer, New Ebenezer Retreat Center Western terminus of SR 275
Springfield SR 21 Spur north (Laurel Street) – Springfield Southern terminus of SR 21 Spur
SR 119 (Madison Street) – Guyton, Springfield, Old Jail Museum
SR 21 Spur south – Springfield Northern terminus of SR 21 Spur
Screven SR 21 Bus. north (Savannah Highway) – Newington Southern terminus of SR 21 Bus.
Newington SR 24 (Oliver Highway) – Oliver, Waynesboro
SR 21 Bus. south (Savannah Highway) Northern terminus of SR 21 Bus.
SR 21 Bus. north (South Main Street) – Sylvania Southern terminus of SR 21 Bus.
US 301 south / SR 73 south – Statesboro South end of US 301 and SR 73 concurrencies
SR 73 north / SR 73 Loop begins – Sylvania North end of SR 73 concurrency; south end of SR 73 Loop concurrency
Sylvania US 301 north / SR 73 Loop north / SR 21 Bus. south – Allendale, Sylvania North end of US 301 and SR 73 Loop concurrencies; northern terminus of SR 21 Bus.
Jenkins SR 67 south – Millen Northern terminus of SR 67
SR 23 (Sardis Road) – Millen, Sardis
Millen US 25 / SR 121 – Millen, Waynesboro, Magnolia Springs State Park Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Special routes[edit]

Garden City spur route[edit]

State Route 21 Spur
Location: Garden City
Length: 1.2 mi[50] (1.9 km)
Existed: 1960[22][23]–present

State Route 21 Spur (SR 21 Spur) is a 1.2-mile-long (1.9 km) spur route that exists entirely within Chatham County. Part of the highway is in the city limits of Garden City. It is known as Brampton Road for its entire length.

It begins at an intersection with the SR 21 mainline (Augusta Road) in the northeastern part of Garden City, just northwest of the western terminus of Interstate 516 (I-516). It travels to the northeast and intersects SR 25 (Coastal Road), on the edge of the city limits. The highway continues to the northeast and reaches its eastern terminus, Georgia Ports Authority's Gate #2, and the entrance to GAF Materials Corporation, on the Savannah River.[50]

The path of SR 21 Spur east of the intersection with SR 25 is included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[6]

Between July 1957 and June 1960, SR 21 Spur was established on its current path.[22][23]

The entire route is in Chatham County.

Location mi[50] km Destinations Notes
Garden City 0.0 0.0 SR 21 (Augusta Road) – Savannah, Port Wentworth Western terminus
0.4 0.64 SR 25 (Coastal Road) – Savannah, Port Wentworth Former US 17
1.2 1.9 Georgia Ports Authority's Gate #2; entrance to GAF Materials Corporation Eastern terminus at Port of Savannah
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Port Wentworth alternate route[edit]

State Route 21 Alternate
Location: Port Wentworth
Length: 3.1 mi[51] (5.0 km)
Existed: 2017[52]–present

State Route 21 Alternate (SR 21 Alt.) is an alternate route of SR 21 that mostly exists in Port Wentworth. It is known as Jimmy DeLoach Connector for its entire length. It begins at an intersection with SR 307 (Bourne Avenue), just north of Garden City. It travels due north and enters the city limits of Port Wentworth. Immediately, it curves to the north-northwest. It has an interchange with Grange Road. Then, it has an interchange with Crossgate Road. After traveling on a bridge over some railroad tracks of Norfolk Southern Railway, it has an interchange with SR 30 (Bonnybridge Road). After crossing over St. Augustine Creek, it curves to the northwest and has an interchange with Jimmy DeLoach Parkway. Then, it heads to the west-southwest and reaches its northern terminus, an interchange with SR 21/SR 30 (Augusta Road). This "interchange", the Sonny Dixon Interchange, is more like an intersection.[51]

Between the beginning of 2008 and the beginning of 2013, the roadway that would eventually become SR 21 Alt. was proposed as SR 1234 along roughly this same path.[53][54] In 2016, this roadway was completed.[54][55] In May 2017, Savannah and nearby Pooler requested that the Jimmy DeLoach Connector be included into the state highway system.[52]

The entire route is in Chatham County.

Location mi[51] km Destinations Notes
0.0 0.0 SR 307 (Bourne Avenue) Southern terminus
Port Wentworth 0.6 0.97 Grange Road Interchange
1.6 2.6 Crossgate Road Interchange
2.2 3.5 SR 30 (Bonnybridge Road) Interchange
2.6 4.2 Jimmy DeLoach Parkway west Interchange; eastern terminus of Jimmy DeLoach Parkway
3.1 5.0 SR 21 / SR 30 (Augusta Road) to I‑95 Northern terminus; Sonny Dixon Interchange
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Chatham County spur route[edit]

State Route 21 Spur
Location: Chatham County
Existed: 1946[15][16]–1960[22][23]

State Route 21 Spur (SR 21 Spur) was a spur route of SR 21 that existed in the northern part of Chatham County. Between the beginning of 1945 and November 1946, it was established from SR 21/SR 30 north-northwest of Industrial City Gardens (the former name of Garden City) east to US 17/SR 25 north of the city.[15][16] Between July 1957 and June 1960, it was decommissioned.[22][23]

The entire route was in Chatham County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
SR 21 / SR 30 Western terminus
US 17 / SR 25 Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Springfield business loop[edit]

State Route 21 Business
Location: Springfield
Existed: 2009[57][58]–2017[56]

State Route 21 Business (SR 21 Bus.) was a business route of SR 21 that existed in Springfield. Between the beginning of 1997 and the beginning of 2010, it was established on SR 21's former path from SR 21 in the southeastern part of the city to the southern terminus of SR 21 Spur.[57][58] At least as early as 2015, the business route was decommissioned.[56]

The entire route was in Springfield, Effingham County.

mi km Destinations Notes
SR 21 Southern terminus
SR 119 south South end of SR 119 concurrency
SR 21 Spur north / SR 119 north Northern terminus of SR 21 Bus.; southern terminus of SR 21 Spur; north end of SR 119 concurrency; former SR 21 north
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Springfield spur route[edit]

State Route 21 Spur
Location: Springfield
Length: 0.50 mi[59] (0.80 km)
Existed: 2009[57][58]–present

State Route 21 Spur (SR 21 Spur) is a 0.5-mile-long (0.80 km) spur route of SR 21 that exists entirely within the central part of Effingham County. The southern terminus of the highway is in the city limits of Springfield. It is known as Old Tusculum Road for its entire length.

It begins at an intersection with SR 119 (North Laurel Street). SR 21 Spur heads to the west-northwest. About 2,500 feet (760 m) later, it meets its northern terminus, an intersection with the SR 21 mainline.[59]

SR 21 Spur is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[5]

Between the beginning of 1997 and the beginning of 2010, it was established from the northern terminus of SR 21 Bus. on SR 119 to SR 21 north-northwest of the city, which is the current path of the highway.[57][58]

The entire route is in Effingham County.

Location mi[59] km Destinations Notes
Springfield 0.0 0.0 SR 119 (North Laurel Street) to I‑16 – Clyo, Garnett, S.C., Springfield, Effingham Hospital Southern terminus; former SR 21 south; former SR 21 Bus. south
0.5 0.80 SR 21 (Springfield Bypass) / Old Tusculum Road west – Rincon, Newington Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Newington business loop[edit]

State Route 21 Business
Location: Newington
Length: 1.7 mi[60] (2.7 km)
Existed: 2010[48][49]–present

State Route 21 Business (SR 21 Bus.) is a business route of SR 21 that is entirely within the southeastern part of Screven County. Most of the route is in the city limits of Newington. It is known as Savannah Highway for its entire length.

It begins at an intersection with the SR 21 mainline just southeast of Newington. It travels to the northeast and curves to the northwest to enter the town. It intersects SR 24. It has a brief section that is outside of the city limits before curving to the east and re-entering the city limits. Immediately after, it meets its northern terminus, another intersection with the SR 21 mainline.[60]

SR 21 Bus. is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[5]

At least as early as 1919, the SR 21 mainline was established on this path.[1] In 1934, this path had a "completed hard surface".[61][62] In 2010, the path of SR 21 was shifted southwestward. Its former path was redesignated as SR 21 Bus.[48][49]

The entire route is in Screven County.

Location mi[60] km Destinations Notes
0.0 0.0 SR 21 – Springfield, Sylvania Southern terminus
Newington 0.9 1.4 SR 24 (Oliver Highway/Newington Highway) – Statesboro, Waynesboro
1.7 2.7 SR 21 – Springfield, Sylvania Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Sylvania business loop[edit]

State Route 21 Business
Location: Sylvania
Length: 2.9 mi[63] (4.7 km)
Existed: 1993[42][43]–present

State Route 21 Business (SR 21 Bus.) is a 2.9-mile-long (4.7 km) business route that exists entirely within the central part of Screven County. All but the southern-most 0.5 miles (0.80 km) of the route travels within the city limits of Sylvania. It is the former alignment of SR 21 through Sylvania.[1][43]

It begins at an intersection with the SR 21 mainline, just southeast of Sylvania. It travels to the northwest and enters the city. Then, it curves to the north-northwest and intersects SR 73 (North Main Street). The two highways travel concurrently to the southwest. They intersect the southern terminus of Maple Street, which is the former SR 21 Conn. When they diverge, SR 21 travels to the northwest. The highway passes Screven County Hospital and Brantley Plaza Shopping Center. Approximately 0.9 miles (1.4 km) after the northern SR 73 intersection, it meets its northern terminus, an intersection with US 301/SR 21/SR 73 Loop.[63]

SR 21 Spur is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[5]

At least as early as 1919, SR 21 was established on this path.[1] In 1937, the path of SR 21 in the southern part of Sylvania had a "completed hard surface".[64][13] Between the beginning of 1945 and November 1946, the path of the highway in the northern part of the city was hard surfaced.[15][16] In 1988, an unnumbered road was built from SR 21 southeast of Sylvania to US 301/SR 73 at the southern terminus of SR 73 Loop south-southwest of the city.[38][39] In 1990, this road south of Sylvania was designated as SR 829.[40][41] In 1993, the path of SR 21 in the Sylvania area was shifted south-southwest, replacing the path of SR 829 and then routed on US 301/SR 73 Loop. Its former path was redesignated as SR 21 Bus.[42][43]

The entire route is in Screven County.

Location mi[63] km Destinations Notes
0.0 0.0 SR 21 (Perimeter Road/Savannah Highway) – Springfield Southern terminus
Sylvania 1.6 2.6 SR 73 north (North Main Street) – Allendale South end of SR 73 concurrency; on one-way street around town square
1.7 2.7 Maple Street north Former SR 21 Conn.
2.0 3.2 SR 73 south (West Ogeechee Street) – Statesboro North end of SR 73 concurrency
2.9 4.7 US 301 / SR 21 / SR 73 Loop – Statesboro, Allendale SC, Millen, Screven County Industrial Park, Screven County Receation Department Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Sylvania connector route[edit]

State Route 21 Connector
Location: Sylvania
Existed: 2009[67][65]–2012[65][66]

State Route 21 Connector (SR 21 Conn.) was a short connector route of SR 21 that existed entirely within the city limits of Sylvania. Between the beginning of 1995 and the beginning of 2010, it was established from SR 21/SR 73 (West Ogeechee Street) north-northwest on Maple Street and east-northeast on West W. T. Sharpe Drive to US 301 Bus./SR 73 (North Main Street).[67][65] By the beginning of 2013, this highway was decommissioned.[65][66]

The entire route was in Sylvania, Screven County.

mi km Destinations Notes
SR 21 / SR 73 (West Ogeechee Street) Southern terminus
US 301 Bus. / SR 73 (North Main Street) Northern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  2. ^ Google (January 9, 2017). "Overview map of SR 21" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved January 9, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b House Resolution 756 - Designate Tom Triplett Parkway, First Reader Summary, May 1, 2000
  4. ^ Political icon Tom Triplett dead at 71, Larry Peterson, Savannah Morning News, June 24, 2006
  5. ^ a b c d National Highway System: Georgia (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved January 9, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b National Highway System: Savannah, GA (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved January 9, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  8. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1926). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  9. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  10. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (November 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  11. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  12. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  13. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  14. ^ Georgia State Highway Board (January 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  15. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  16. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017.  (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  17. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1949). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017.  (Corrected to April 1, 1949.)
  18. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1950). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017.  (Corrected to August 1, 1950.)
  19. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1952). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017.  (Corrected to January 1, 1952.)
  20. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1954). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1954.)
  21. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1955). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1955.)
  22. ^ a b c d e f State Highway Department of Georgia (1957). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017.  (Corrected to July 1, 1957.)
  23. ^ a b c d e f State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–61 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  24. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1963). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved June 17, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1963.)
  25. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1966). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  26. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1967). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  27. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1968). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  28. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1969). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  29. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1970). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  30. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1971). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  31. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1977). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1977–78 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  32. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1977). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1977–78 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  33. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1978). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1978-79 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  34. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1981). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1981–82 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  35. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1982). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  36. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1984). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1984–85 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  37. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1986). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1986–87 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  38. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1988). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1988–89 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  39. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (1989). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1989–90 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  40. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (1990). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1990–91 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 17, 2017. 
  41. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1991). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1991–92 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  42. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (1993). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1993–94 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  43. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (1994). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1994–95 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  44. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1995). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1995–96 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  45. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1996). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1996–97 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  46. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1997). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1997–98 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  47. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1998). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1998–99 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  48. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (2009). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (2009–10 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  49. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (2011). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (2011–12 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. OCLC 770217845. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  50. ^ a b c Google (August 26, 2013). "Overview map of SR 21 Spur (Garden City)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 
  51. ^ a b c Google (June 18, 2017). "Overview map of SR 21 Alt." (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  52. ^ a b Quimby, Kelly (May 16, 2017). "Pooler joins Savannah in request for state maintenance of Jimmy DeLoach Parkway". Savannah: Savannah Morning News (published May 15, 2017). Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  53. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (2008). General Highway Map: Chatham County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  54. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (2013). General Highway Map: Chatham County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  55. ^ "New Jimmy DeLoach Connector Opens". Savannah: Savannah Tribune. June 1, 2016. Retrieved June 18, 2017. 
  56. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (2015). General Highway Map: Effingham County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  57. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (1997). General Highway Map: Effingham County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  58. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (2010). General Highway Map: Effingham County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  59. ^ a b c Google (August 26, 2013). "Overview map of SR 21 Spur (Springfield)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 
  60. ^ a b c Google (5 May 2016). "Overview map of SR 21 Bus." (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved 5 May 2016. 
  61. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April–May 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 19, 2017. 
  62. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 19, 2017. 
  63. ^ a b c Google (August 26, 2013). "Overview map of SR 21 Bus." (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 
  64. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved June 19, 2017. 
  65. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (2010). General Highway Map: Screven County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Sylvania inset – via GDOT Maps. 
  66. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (2013). General Highway Map: Screven County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Sylvania inset – via GDOT Maps. 
  67. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1995). General Highway Map: Screven County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Sylvania inset – via GDOT Maps. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google

KML is from Wikidata