Georgia State Route 27

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State Route 27 marker

State Route 27
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length: 264.0 mi[2] (424.9 km)
Existed: 1919[1] – present
Major junctions
West end: US 82 / SR 39 / SR 50 in Georgetown
 
East end: US 17 / US 341 / SR 25 in Brunswick
Location
Counties: Quitman, Stewart, Webster, Sumter, Dooly, Pulaski, Dodge, Telfair, Jeff Davis, Appling, Wayne, Glynn
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
US 27 SR 28

State Route 27 (SR 27) is a 264-mile-long (425 km) state highway that travels west-to-east through portions of Quitman, Stewart, Webster, Sumter, Dooly, Pulaski, Dodge, Telfair, Jeff Davis, Appling, Wayne, and Glynn counties in the southern part of the U.S. state of Georgia, crossing nearly the entire state from Georgetown, just east of the Alabama state line to Brunswick, just west of the Atlantic coast.

The route connects US 82/SR 39/SR 50 in Georgetown with US 17/SR 25 in Brunswick, via Lumpkin, Preston, Americus, Vienna, Hawkinsville, Eastman, Helena–McRae, Hazlehurst, Baxley, and Jesup. The highway is concurrent with US 280 and US 341 for most of its length (the latter one at its eastern terminus).

Route description[edit]

SR 27 begins at an intersection with US 82/SR 39/SR 50 (Middle Street) in Georgetown, within Quitman County. SR 27/SR 39 travel concurrently to the northeast. Then, the two highways diverge with SR 27 continuing through rural areas of the northeastern part of the county. The highway enters Stewart County, before entering Lumpkin. There it intersects US 27/SR 1. Three blocks later is the southern terminus of SR 1 Conn. (Chestnut Street). Farther to the northeast, in Richland, is an intersection with US 280/SR 520 (Richland Bypass). At this intersection, US 280/SR 27 begin a concurrency to the east. After leaving town, the concurrency enters Webster County. They curve to the southeast and enter Preston, where SR 41 briefly joins the concurrency. Farther along, US 280/SR 27 enter Sumter County. They enter Plains. In town is an intersection with SR 45 (Bond Street). The two highways stairstep their way to the east-northeast toward Americus. Just before entering town, first SR 49 (Salters Mill Road), and then US 19/SR 3 (South Martin Luther King Boulevard), join the concurrency. The five highways enter the city limits and curve to the northeast. Next to the Perlis Plaza Shopping Center, they intersect SR 30. At this intersection, US 280/SR 27/SR 30 east/SR 49 turn to the right, while US 19/SR 3/SR 30 west (North Martin Luther King Boulevard) continue to the northeast. The four highways intersect SR 377 (South Lee Street). Just past Oak Grove Cemetery, SR 49 departs the concurrency on Tripp Street. Next to Pine Pointe Shopping Center, SR 27 departs the concurrency to the east on Vienna Road and passes Shipp Lake and Pat Crumpton Lake, before intersecting SR 195. After that, it crosses over the Flint River into Dooly County. The highway travels to the north of Bartenfield Lake and enters Vienna. Just inside the city limits, it intersects SR 90. The two highways travel concurrent into the main part of town, to an intersection with US 41/SR 7 (3rd Street). At this intersection, SR 90 leaves the concurrency to the south, while SR 27 continues to the east-southeast. It passes George Busbee Park and meets the western terminus of SR 215 (East Union Street). Here, SR 27 curves to the north-northeast and leaves town. It curves to a more northeasterly routing and has an interchange with Interstate 75 (I-75). Then, it curves to a nearly due-east orientation. After a bend to the northeast, the highway enters Pulaski County.[2]

There are two sections of SR 27 that are included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility:

  • The segment from Richland to Americus, concurrent with US 280
  • The segment from Hawkinsville to its eastern terminus, concurrent with US 341[3][4]

History[edit]

1920s[edit]

SR 27 was established at least as early as 1919 from Hawkinsville to a point northwest of Brunswick. It was also designated south-southwest and curved to the southeast to end at SR 40 northwest of St. Marys. At this time, SR 28 was established from SR 39 in Georgetown to SR 7 in Vienna.[1] By the end of 1921, SR 50 was established on its current path in Georgetown, becoming SR 27's new western terminus, since SR 39 was shifted southeast and out of the city. The eastern terminus of SR 27 was then indicated to be at SR 25 in Brunswick. SR 27 had a segment northwest of Brunswick, which meant that it intersected itself. It was then proposed south-southwest to SR 40 in Kingsland.[1][5] By the end of 1926, US 341 was designated on SR 27 from Hawkinsville to Brunswick. The separate segment from north-northwest of Brunswick to Kingsland was redesignated as US 17/SR 25. Nearly the entire Sumter County portion of the Preston–Americus segment of SR 28, as well as the portion of US 341/SR 27 east of US 17/SR 25, had a "completed hard surface". A portion of US 341/SR 27 straddling the Wayne–Glynn county line had a "completed semi hard surface". Nearly the entire Dooly County portion of the Americus–Vienna segment of SR 28 had a "sand clay or top soil" surface. Four segments of US 341/SR 27 also had this type of surface: the entire Telfair County portion, nearly the entire Appling County portion of the Hazlehurst–Baxley segment, from Baxley to just east of the Appling–Wayne county line, and the northern part of the Jesup–Brunswick segment. A portion of SR 28 east-southeast of Preston, as well as nearly the entire Wayne County portion of the Baxley–Jesup and the central portion of Glynn County segments of US 341/SR 27, was under construction.[5][6] By the end of 1929, US 341/SR 27 had a completed hard surface west-northwest of Jesup. East of Lumpkin and in the Preston area, SR 28 had a sand clay or top soil surface. Southeast of Baxley, US 341/SR 27 also had this type of surface. Three segments of US 341/SR 27 were under construction: from Hawkinsville to Eastman, from McRae to Lumber City, and the entire Appling County portion of the Hazlehurst–Baxley segment. Two segments of US 341/SR 27 had completed grading: nearly the entire Lumber City–Hazlehurst segment and nearly the entire Appling County portion of the Baxley–Jesup segment.[6][7]

1930s[edit]

By the middle of 1930, SR 28 was extended northeast to Hawkinsville. The entire Glynn County portion of US 341/SR 27 had a completed hard surface. A portion of SR 28 east-southeast of Preston, as well as the McRae–Lumber City segment and Wayne County portion of the Baxley–Jesup segment of US 341/SR 27, had a sand clay or top soil surface. A portion of SR 28 west-northwest of Preston was under construction.[7][8] By the end of the year, a portion of US 341/SR 27 east-southeast of Baxley had a sand clay or top soil surface. SR 28's segment between Richland and Preston, as well as the Dooly County portion of the Eastman–McRae segment of US 341/SR 27, and a portion of those highways northwest of the Wayne–Glynn county line, was under construction.[8][9] By the end of 1931, US 280 was designated on SR 28 between Richland and Americus. Three segments of US 341/SR 27 had a completed hard surface: from Hawkinsville to Eastman, from northwest of McRae to Hazlehurst, and from east-southeast of Hazlehurst to Baxley. Two segments of those highways were under construction: from Eastman to northwest of McRae and a portion east-southeast of Hazlehurst.[9][10] In April 1932, the Hazlehurst–Baxley segment of US 341/SR 27 had a completed hard surface.[11][12] By the beginning of August, their segment between Eastman to McRae was also completed.[12][13] In September, the Vienna–Hawkinsville segment of SR 28 had a sand clay or top soil surface.[14][15] Late in 1934, the northern half of the Appling County portion of the Baxley–Jesup segment of US 341/SR 27, as well as a small portion east of the Appling–Wayne county line, had a completed hard surface.[16][17] In the second quarter of 1935, two segments of US 341/SR 27 had a completed hard surface: from Baxley to just east of the Appling–Wayne county line and nearly the entire Wayne County portion of the Baxley–Jesup segment. A small portion east-southeast of the Appling–Wayne county line had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[18][19] By the beginning of October, the entire Wayne County portion of the Baxley–Jesup segment had a completed hard surface. A portion just west of the Appling–Wayne county line was under construction.[19][20] By the end of the year, from Baxley to a point southeast of Jesup, US 341/SR 27 had a completed hard surface.[20][21] Near the end of the year, from Richland to just west of the Webster–Sumter county line, SR 28 was under construction.[22][23] The year ended with two additional changes to SR 28. From northwest of Preston to east-southeast of it, the highway had a completed hard surface. From Richland to northwest of Preston, it had a sand clay or top soil surface.[23][24] In the first quarter of 1937, a portion of SR 28 in the southwestern part of Hawkinsville had a completed hard surface. It was under construction from just east of the Dooly–Pulaski county line to southwest of Hawkinsville.[25][26] In the third quarter of the year, the entire Jesup–Brunswick segment had a completed hard surface.[26][27] At the end of the year, the entire length of SR 28 was redesignated as a western extension of SR 27. From the Dooly–Pulaski county line to southwest of Hawkinsville, the highway had completed grading, but was not surfaced. The western half of the Lumpkin–Richland segment was under construction.[27][28] In 1938, from east-southeast of Preston to east of the Webster–Sumter county line, SR 27 was under construction.[28][29] By the middle of 1939, US 25 was extended southward, onto the Jesup–Brunswick segment of US 341/SR 27. The western part of the Lumpkin–Richland segment had a completed hard surface, while the central part of it had completed grading, but was not surfaced. A portion east of Americus was under construction.[29][30] In the third quarter of the year, this segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[30][31] At the end of the year, a portion just west of the Dooly–Pulaski county line was under construction.[31][32]

1940s to 1990s[edit]

In the first quarter of 1940, the entire Preston–Americus segment had a completed hard surface.[32][33] In the third quarter of the year, the western half of the Quitman County portion of the Georgetown–Lumpkin segment was under construction.[33][34] During the second half of the next year, a portion east-northeast of Vienna had a completed hard surface. The western half of the Quitman County portion of the Georgetown–Lumpkin segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced. The western part of the Webster County portion of the Richland–Preston segment was under construction.[35][36] In 1942, from just east-northeast of Richland to Preston, the highway had a completed hard surface.[36][37] Between the beginning of 1945 and November 1946, a portion from just west of Richland to Preston was hard surfaced.[38][39] By February 1948, four segments were hard surfaced: from Georgetown to a point west-southwest of Lumpkin, the Lumpkin–Richland segment, a portion east-southeast of Americus, and the entire Pulaski County segment. Also, the eastern part of the Sumter County portion of the Americus–Vienna segment had a sand clay or top soil surface.[39][40] By April 1949, the entire Georgetown–Lumpkin segment was hard surfaced.[40][41] Between August 1950 and January 1952, the eastern half of the Dooly County portion of the Americus–Vienna segment was hard surfaced.[42][43] In 1953, the entire Dooly County portion (except the extreme western part) was hard surfaced.[44][45] Between June 1955 and July 1957, the entire highway from Georgetown to Brunswick was paved.[46][47] In 1972, SR 39 was extended northward on the westernmost portion of SR 27, as it travels today.[48][49] Between the beginning of 1981 and the beginning of 1987, SR 782 was proposed between US 25/US 341/SR 27 and SR 27 Alt.[50][51] In 1989, a southwestern bypass of Eastman, designated as SR 841, was proposed from US 341/SR 27 west of the city to US 23/US 341/SR 27 southeast of it.[52][53] In 1993, US 341/SR 27 through Eastman was shifted southward out of the main part of the city onto the path of SR 841. Their former path was redesignated as US 341 Bus./SR 27 Bus.[54][55] Between the beginning of 1987 and the beginning of 1997, US 23/US 341/SR 27 through Jesup was shifted northeast onto the path of SR 27 Alt. and SR 782[51][56]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[2] km Destinations Notes
Quitman Georgetown 0.0 0.0 US 82 / SR 50 / SR 39 south – Eufaula, Cuthbert, Fort Gaines Western terminus; west end of SR 39 concurrency
0.9 1.4 SR 39 north – Omaha East end of SR 39 concurrency
Stewart Lumpkin 22.4 36.0 US 27 / SR 1 (Martha Berry Highway)
22.9 36.9 SR 1 Conn. (Chestnut Street)
Richland 30.9 49.7 US 280 west / SR 520 (Richland Bypass) – Cusseta, Dawson West end of US 280 concurrency
Webster Preston 40.4 65.0 SR 41 south (South Washington Street) – Weston West end of SR 41 concurrency
40.5 65.2 SR 41 north (Cass Street) – Buena Vista East end of SR 41 concurrency
Sumter Plains 49.7 80.0 SR 45 south (South Bond Street) – Dawson Northern terminus of SR 45
57.6 92.7 SR 49 south – Dawson West end of SR 49 concurrency
58.6 94.3 US 19 south / SR 3 south (South Martin Luther King Boulevard) West end of US 19/SR 3 concurrency
Americus 59.4 95.6 US 19 north / SR 3 north / SR 30 west (South Martin Luther King Boulevard) East end of US 19/SR 3 concurrency; west end of SR 30 concurrency
60.1 96.7 SR 377 south (South Lee Street) – Leesburg Northern terminus of SR 377
61.0 98.2 SR 49 north (Tripp Street) – Andersonville East end of SR 49 concurrency
61.6 99.1 US 280 east / SR 30 east (East Lamar Street) East end of US 280 and SR 30 concurrencies
70.6 113.6 SR 195 (Bailey Avenue) – De Soto, Andersonville
Flint River 75.7 121.8 Luther Story Bridge; marking the Sumter–Dooly county line
Dooly Drayton 77.4 124.6 SR 230 west (River Road) – Byromville Western terminus of SR 230
Vienna 86.6 139.4 SR 90 north (Union Street) – Lilly West end of SR 90 concurrency
87.6 141.0 US 41 / SR 7 / SR 90 south (3rd Street) East end of SR 90 concurrency
88.3 142.1 SR 215 east (East Union Street) – Pitts Western terminus of SR 215
91.0 146.5 I‑75 (SR 401) – Valdosta, Macon I-75 exit 112
Pulaski 109 175 SR 257 south (Cordele Highway) – Cordele West end of SR 257 concurrency
Hawkinsville 113 182 US 129 north / US 341 north / SR 11 north (Broad Street) / SR 230 north West end of US 129/SR 11, US 341, and SR 230 concurrencies
113 182 US 129 south / SR 11 south / SR 112 south (Jackson Street South)
US 129 Alt. north / US 129 Bus. north / SR 11 Bus. north (Jackson Street South)
East end of US 129/SR 11 concurrency; west end of US 129 Alt./SR 112 concurrency; southern terminus of US 129 Bus./SR 11 Bus.
113 182 SR 26 west / SR 112 south West end of SR 26/SR 112 concurency
Hartford 113.7 183.0 US 129 Alt. north / SR 26 east / SR 112 north / SR 257 north (Cochran Highway)
SR 230 east (Lower River Road)
East end of US 129 Alt., SR 26/SR 112, SR 230, and SR 257 concurrencies
Dodge 130.1 209.4 US 341 Bus. south / SR 27 Bus. east / SR 46 east (Fish Road) Northern terminus of US 341 Bus.; western terminus of SR 27 Bus./SR 46
132.2 212.8 SR 87 / SR 117 (Rhine Highway/Griffin Avenue)
133.4 214.7 US 23 north / US 341 Bus. north / SR 27 Bus. west (College Street) Southern terminus of US 341 Bus./SR 27 Bus.; west end of US 23 concurrency
Chauncey 140.6 226.3 SR 165 south (Chauncey–Rhine Highway) – Rhine West end of SR 165 concurrency
141.1 227.1 SR 165 north (Chauncey–Dublin Highway) East end of SR 165 concurrency
Telfair McRae 151.6 244.0 US 280 / US 319 / US 441 / SR 31 (3rd Avenue) – Milan, Jacksonville, Alamo, Dublin
156.1 251.2 SR 149 – Scotland
Lumber City 168.2 270.7 SR 117 north (Main Street) – Jacksonville Southern terminus of SR 117
168.5 271.2 SR 19 north – Glenwood West end of SR 19 concurrency
Jeff Davis Hazlehurst 175.4 282.3 US 221 north / SR 135 north (North Tallahassee Street) West end of US 221/SR 135 concurrency (only US 221/SR 135 northbound join the concurrency.
175.5 282.4 SR 19 Conn. south (East Coffee Street) Northern terminus of SR 19 Conn.
175.6 282.6 US 221 south / SR 135 south (Cromartie Street) East end of US 221/SR 135 concurrency (only US 221/SR 135 northbound join the concurrency.
176.0 283.2 US 23 south / SR 19 south (Tallahassee Street) East end of US 23 and SR 19 concurrencies
Appling Baxley 191.3 307.9 US 1 / SR 4 / SR 15 (Main Street) – Alma, Bristol, Lyons
Surrency 201.0 323.5 SR 121 (Still Street) – Bristol, Glennville
Wayne Jesup 221 356 SR 169 (Lanes Bridge Road)
222 357 US 84 / SR 38 (North 1st Street)
223 359 US 301 / SR 23 (Carey Town Road) / US 25 north – Hortense, Ludowici West end of US 25 concurrency
Glynn Sterling 252 406 SR 32 west / SR 99 (Grants Ferry Road) – Anguilla, Darien Eastern terminus of SR 32
Dock Junction 256 412 To I‑95 / Butler Drive – Jacksonville, Savannah I-95 exit 36
258 415 SR 303 (Blythe Island Highway/Community Road)
Brunswick 262 422 US 25 south / SR 25 Conn. south (Gloucester Street) East end of US 25 concurrency; northern terminus of SR 25 Conn.
264 425 US 17 / SR 25 (Glynn Avenue) / US 341 north – Waverly, Darien Eastern terminus of US 341/SR 27; east end of US 341 concurrency
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Special routes[edit]

Eastman business loop[edit]

State Route 27 Business
Location: Eastman
Length: 3.9 mi[57] (6.3 km)
Existed: 1993[54][55]–present

State Route 27 Business (SR 27 Bus.) is a 3.9-mile-long (6.3 km) business route of SR 27 that exists entirely within the central part of Dodge County. The route is almost entirely within the city limits of Eastman.

It begins just west of Eastman, at an intersection with US 341/SR 27.It travels to the northeast on Fish Road, concurrent with US 341 Bus./SR 46. Then, they curve to a due-east direction, onto Hawkinsville Highway. They enter the city limits of Eastman and curve to the southeast, onto Ogden Street. They turn left onto 5th Avenue and travel to the northeast. At an intersection with US 23/SR 87/SR 117 (Oak Street), SR 46 departs the concurrency, and US 23/SR 87/SR 117 join it. At Griffin Street, SR 87/SR 117 departs the concurrency. The three highways continue to the southeast and intersect US 341/SR 27 (Terry Coleman Parkway). Here, US 341 Bus. and SR 27 Bus. end, and US 23 joins the US 341/SR 27 concurrency.[57]

SR 27 Bus. is not part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility.[3]

In 1989, a southwestern bypass of Eastman, designated as SR 841, was proposed from US 341/SR 27 west of the city to US 23/US 341/SR 27 southeast of it.[52][53] In 1993, US 341/SR 27 through Eastman was shifted southward out of the main part of the city onto the path of SR 841. Their former path was redesignated as US 341 Bus./SR 27 Bus.[54][55]

The entire route is in Dodge County.

Location mi[2] km Destinations Notes
0.0 0.0 US 341 / SR 27 / SR 46 / US 341 Bus. begins – McRae, Hawkinsville Western terminus of SR 27 Alt. and SR 46; northern terminus of US 341 Bus.; west end of US 341 Bus. and SR 46 concurrencies
Eastman 1.9 3.1 US 23 north / SR 87 north (Oak Street) / SR 46 east / SR 117 north (5th Avenue) to I‑16 east – Cadwell, Soperton, Cochran, Eastman – Dodge County Airport, Recreation Department, Middle Georgia College Georgia Aviation Campus East end of SR 46 concurrency; west end of US 23 and SR 87/SR 117 concurr3encies
1.5 2.4 SR 87 south / SR 117 south (Griffin Street) – Rhine, Dodge County Hospital East end of SR 87/SR 117 concurrency
3.9 6.3 US 23 south / US 341 / SR 27 (Terry Coleman Parkway) / US 341 Bus. ends – McRae, Hawkinsville Eastern terminus of SR 27 Bus.; southern terminus of US 341 Bus. east end of US 341 Bus. concurrency; Heart of Georgia Armed Forces Veterans Memorial Intersection
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

McRae loop route[edit]

State Route 27 Loop
Location: McRae
Existed: 1977[60][61]–1987[58][59]

State Route 27 Loop (SR 27 Loop) was a loop route of SR 27 that existed in the north-central part of Telfair County. In 1977, it was established from US 23/US 341/SR 27 in Helena, through the northern part of Helena and McRae, to an intersection with US 23/US 341/SR 27 in McRae.[60][61] In 1987, SR 27 Loop was decommissioned.[58][59]

The entire route was in Telfair County.

Location mi km Destinations Notes
Helena US 23 / US 341 / SR 27 Western terminus
McRae US 280 / US 319 / US 441 / SR 30 / SR 31
US 23 / US 341 / SR 27 Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Jesup alternate route[edit]

State Route 27 Alternate
Location: Jesup
Existed: 1963[62][63]–1989[52][53]

State Route 27 Alternate (SR 27 Alt.) was an alternate route of SR 27 that existed in the north-central part of Wayne County. It existed entirely within the city limits of Jesup. Between June 1960 and June 1963, it was established from US 23/US 341/SR 27 in the northwest part of the city to an intersection with US 23/US 25/US 301/US 341/SR 23/SR 27 in the southeastern part of the city. It had a sole segment and a southwestern one-block concurrency with US 25/US 301/SR 23.[62][63] In 1989, US 23/US 341/SR 27 was shifted northeast, replacing nearly the entire length of SR 27 Alt.[52][53]

The entire route was in Jesup, Wayne County.

mi km Destinations Notes
US 23 / US 341 / SR 27 Western terminus
SR 169
US 82 / SR 38
US 25 north / US 301 north / SR 23 north West end of US 25/US 301/SR 23 concurrncy
US 25 south / US 301 south / SR 23 south / US 23 / US 341 / SR 27 Eastern terminus; east end of US 25/US 301/SR 23 concurrncy
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

Brunswick spur route[edit]

State Route 27 Spur
Location: Brunswick
Existed: 1965[63][66]–1981[64][65]

State Route 27 Spur (SR 27 Spur) was a spur route of SR 27 that existed in the south-central part of Glynn County and completely within the city limits of Brunswick. Between June 1963 and the end of 1965, it was established and hard surfaced on 1st Avenue, extending west-southwest from US 84/US 341/SR 27 (Newcastle Street).[63][66] In 1981, it was decommissioned.[64][65]

The entire route was in Brunswick, Glynn County.

mi km Destinations Notes
Dead end Western terminus
US 84 / US 341 / SR 27 (Newcastle Street) Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c State Highway Department of Georgia (1920). System of State Aid Roads as Approved Representing 4800 Miles of State Aid Roads Outside the Limits of the Incorporated Towns (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b c d Google (December 25, 2013). "Overview map of SR 27 (Georgetown to Hawkinsville)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
    Google (December 25, 2013). "Overview map of SR 27 (Hawkinsville to Brunswick)" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved December 25, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b "National Highway System: Georgia" (PDF). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved January 16, 2017. 
  4. ^ "National Highway System: Brunswick, GA" (PDF). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved January 16, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1921). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1926). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1929). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  8. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  9. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (November 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  10. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  11. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  12. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (May 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  13. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (August 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  14. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (September 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  15. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1932). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 4, 2017. 
  16. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  17. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1935). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  18. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1935). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  19. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1935). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  20. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1935). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  21. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1936). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  22. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1936). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  23. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1936). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  24. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  25. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  26. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  27. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  28. ^ a b Georgia State Highway Board (January 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  29. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (September 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  30. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  31. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  32. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  33. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  34. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  35. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  36. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1942). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  37. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1943). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  38. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1945). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  39. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017.  (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  40. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1948). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017.  (Corrected to February 28, 1948.)
  41. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1949). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 5, 2017.  (Corrected to April 1, 1949.)
  42. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1950). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 6, 2017.  (Corrected to August 1, 1950.)
  43. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1952). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 6, 2017.  (Corrected to January 1, 1952.)
  44. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1953). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 6, 2017.  (Corrected to September 1, 1953.)
  45. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1953). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 6, 2017.  (Corrected to January 1, 1953.)
  46. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1955). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 7, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1955.)
  47. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1957). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 7, 2017.  (Corrected to July 1, 1957.)
  48. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1972). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  49. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1973). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  50. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1981). General Highway Map: Wayne County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  51. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1987). General Highway Map: Wayne County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  52. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (1989). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1989–90 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  53. ^ a b c d Georgia Department of Transportation (1990). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1990–91 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  54. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (1993). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1993–94 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  55. ^ a b c Georgia Department of Transportation (1994). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1994–95 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  56. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (1997). General Highway Map: Wayne County, Georgia (Map). Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation – via GDOT Maps. 
  57. ^ a b Google (August 23, 2013). "Overview map of SR 27 Bus." (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 23, 2013. 
  58. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1987). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1987–88 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  59. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1988). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1988–89 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  60. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1977). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1977–78 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  61. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (January 1977). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map) (1977–78 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  62. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–61 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 7, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  63. ^ a b c d State Highway Department of Georgia (1963). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved May 7, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1963.)
  64. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1981). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (1981–82 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  65. ^ a b Georgia Department of Transportation (1982). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 
  66. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1966). Official Highway Map (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved May 7, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Bing / Google

KML is from Wikidata