Georgia State Route 36

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State Route 36 marker

State Route 36
Route information
Maintained by GDOT
Length: 95.2 mi[3] (153.2 km)
Existed: 1941[1][2] – present
Major junctions
West end: SR 208 east of Waverly Hall
 
East end: US 278 / SR 12 / SR 142 in Covington
Location
Counties: Harris, Talbot, Upson, Lamar, Butts, Newton
Highway system
  • Georgia State Routes
SR 35 SR 37

State Route 36 (SR 36) is a 95.2-mile-long (153.2 km) state highway that travels southwest-to-northeast through portions of Harris, Talbot, Upson, Lamar, Butts, and Newton counties in the central part of the U.S. state of Georgia. The highways connects the Waverly Hall area with Covington, via Thomaston, Barnesville, and Jackson.

Route description[edit]

SR 36 begins at an intersection with SR 208 about 4,000 feet (1,200 m) east of Waverly Hall and just west of the HarrisTalbot county line. Almost immediately, it crosses into Talbot County and travels in a fairly northeasterly direction, before curving to the east-northeast to meet SR 41 in Greens Mill. The two highways head concurrently to the north into Woodland, where they diverge. SR 36 continues to the east-northeast and crosses over the Flint River on the Wynns Bridge into Upson County, in Pleasant Hill. The highway travels through rural areas of the county and enters Thomaston. There, it curves to the north and begins a concurrency with SR 74 (West Gordon Street). The two highways turn to the right and intersect US 19/SR 3. After that, the two highways diverge, with SR 36 continuing to the northeast. Just before McKinney, it passes by Lake Julia, Lake Maude, and Bickley Lake. Just south of The Rock, it has an eastward slide in its routing. Approximately 3 miles (4.8 km) later, it crosses into Lamar County. In the southwestern part of Barnesville, the highway intersects US 41/SR 7/SR 18. The four highways head concurrently to the west and curve to a fairly northerly routing. At Rose Avenue, SR 18 splits off to the west, while the other highways very briefly travel along the Barnesville–Aldora city line, before re-entering Barnesville proper. After leaving town, SR 36 splits off onto Liz Acres Road. It travels through rural areas of the county and then enters Butts County. Almost immediately is an interchange with Interstate 75 (I-75). Northeast of there, the highway crosses over the Towaliga River on the David P. Ridgeway Bridge, before entering Jackson, where it has a brief concurrency with US 23/SR 16/SR 42 (3rd Street). Then, it travels to the west of Hickory Hills Golf Course. To the northeast is a crossing of Tussahaw Creek. Then, it crosses over the South River into Newton County. Then, it meets the southern terminus of SR 162 and crosses over the Yellow River. Just before its intersection with SR 212, it begins to curve to the north. SR 36 enters Covington, where it intersects the Covington Bypass. Here, it turns to the right, where it follows the bypass until it meets its eastern terminus, an intersection with US 278/SR 12/SR 142 in the northeastern part of the city.[3]

The only section of SR 36 that is included as part of the National Highway System, a system of roadways important to the nation's economy, defense, and mobility, is the short section from just southwest of Thomaston to just northeast of the city.[4]

History[edit]

The roadway that would eventually become SR 36 was established in 1930 as SR 72 from US 19/SR 3 north-northwest of Thomaston to SR 18 in Barnesville.[5][6] Later that year, the western terminus was shifted southward into Thomaston.[6][7] At the end of 1933, SR 72 was extended northeast to Jackson.[8][9] A few months later, it was extended again, this time north-northeast to Covington.[10][11] Three years later, the entire length of the Thomaston–Barnesville segment had a "completed hard surface".[12][13] Later that year, SR 72 was extended southwest to SR 41 in Woodland.[13][14] The next year, the then-eastern terminus was under construction.[15][16] By the middle of 1939, the then-western terminus had a completed hard surface. At this time, the then-eastern terminus had a "sand clay or top soil" surface.[16][17] Near the end of 1940, SR 72 was extended north-northwest along SR 41 to Manchester and then west-northwest to SR 85 in Warm Springs. It was possibly also extended west-southwest to US 27/SR 1 in Pine Mountain, but this segment of highway was not designated as any highway. The entire extension had a completed hard surface. Meanwhile, the then-eastern terminus was under construction.[18][19] By the end of the year, the then-eastern terminus had a completed hard surface.[19][20] A few months later, the entire Newton County portion that didn't have a hard surface was under construction.[20][21] By the end of 1941, the entire highway was redesignated as SR 36. The Newton County portion that didn't have a hard surface had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[1][2] In 1943, the portion of SR 36 west of SR 41 was shifted southward to end at SR 208 east of Waverly Hall, as the highway currently does. The former path of the highway was redesignated as SR 190.[22][23] Between 1946 and 1948, the Upson County portion of the Woodland–Thomaston segment, the Lamar County portion of the Barnesville–Jackson segment, and the portion of the highway in the vicinity of the SR 162 intersection northeast of Worthville, all had a "sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth" surface.[24][25] A year later, a portion of SR 36 north of Jackson also had a sand clay, top soil, or stabilized earth surface.[25][26] By the end of 1950, nearly the entire Talbot County portion of the Woodland–Thomaston segment, and the central portion of the Butts County portion of the Jackson–Covington segment, were hard surfaced. The northern portion of this latter segment had completed grading, but was not surfaced.[26][27] By 1952, a small portion west-southwest of Thomaston, as well as nearly all of the Butts County portion of the Jackson–Covington segment, were hard surfaced.[27][28] In 1953, the entire Woodland–Thomaston and Jackson–Covington segments, as well as the Lamar County portion of the Barnesville–Jackson segment, were hard surfaced.[29][30] The next year, the entire Butts County portion of the Barnesville–Jackson segment was hard surfaced.[30][31] A few years later, a small portion south of Woodland was hard surfaced.[32][33] Between 1957 and 1960, the entire segment from its western terminus to Woodland was hard surfaced.[33][34] The highway remained fairly unchanged for over 50 years. Between 2011 and 2013, the eastern terminus was shifted eastward, onto the Covington Bypass.[35][36]

Major intersections[edit]

County Location mi[3] km Destinations Notes
Harris 0.0 0.0 SR 208 – Waverly Hall, Talbotton Western terminus
Talbot 10.3 16.6 SR 41 south – Talbotton West end of SR 41 concurrency
Woodland 12.1 19.5 SR 41 north (Manchester Highway) – Manchester East end of SR 41 concurrency
Flint River 22.3 35.9 Wynns Bridge; Talbot–Upson county line
Upson Thomaston 30.1 48.4 SR 74 west (West Gordon Street) – Woodbury West end of SR 74 concurrency
30.2 48.6 US 19 south / SR 3 south (Church Street) Southbound lanes of US 19/SR 3 on one-way pairs
30.2 48.6 US 19 north / SR 3 north (Center Street) Northbound lanes of US 19/SR 3 on one-way pairs
30.4 48.9 SR 74 east (East Main Street) – Yatesville East end of SR 74 concurrency
Lamar Barnesville 45.6 73.4 US 41 south / SR 7 south / SR 18 east (Veterans Parkway) West end of US 41/SR 7 and SR 18 concurrencies
46.2 74.4 SR 18 west (Rose Avenue) – Zebulon East end of SR 18 concurrency
48.6 78.2 US 41 north / SR 7 north East end of US 41/SR 7 concurrency
Butts 60.9 98.0 I‑75 (SR 401) – Macon, Atlanta I-75 exit 201
62.0 99.8 David P. Ridgeway Bridge over the Towaliga River
Jackson 69.5 111.8 US 23 north / SR 42 north / SR 16 west (West 3rd Street) West end of US 23/SR 16/SR 42 concurrency
69.8 112.3 US 23 south / SR 42 south / SR 16 east (East 3rd Street) East end of US 23/SR 16/SR 42 concurrency
South River 79.0 127.1 Butts–Newton county line
Newton 79.8 128.4 SR 162 north – Porterdale Southern terminus of SR 162
80.3 129.2 Yellow River
82.7 133.1 SR 212 – Monticello, Conyers
Covington 95.2 153.2 US 278 / SR 12 / SR 142 – Conyers, Madison, Walnut Grove, Newborn Eastern terminus
1.000 mi = 1.609 km; 1.000 km = 0.621 mi

In popular culture[edit]

Possibly in relation to SR 36's former northern terminus in Covington's town square, when later episodes of The Dukes of Hazzard were filmed on a set in California, crudely-produced SR 36 route markers were displayed at an intersection near the Hazzard County Court House. In 1978, The Dukes of Hazzard filmed its first five episodes on location in Covington and nearby Conyers.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1942). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c Google (August 17, 2013). "Overview map of SR 36" (Map). Google Maps. Google. Retrieved August 17, 2013. 
  4. ^ National Highway System: Georgia (PDF) (Map). Federal Highway Administration. March 25, 2015. Retrieved January 23, 2017. 
  5. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1929). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (June 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  7. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (November 1930). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  8. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (December 1933). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 15, 2017. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  9. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  10. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (March 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  11. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April–May 1934). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  12. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  13. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  14. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1937). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  15. ^ Georgia State Highway Board (January 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  16. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (September 1, 1938). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  17. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (July 1, 1939). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  18. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  19. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (October 1, 1940). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  20. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  21. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (April 1, 1941). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  22. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1943). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  23. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1944). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  24. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1946). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to November 7, 1946.)
  25. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1948). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to February 28, 1948.)
  26. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1949). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to April 1, 1949.)
  27. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1950). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to August 1, 1950.)
  28. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1952). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to January 1, 1952.)
  29. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (January 1, 1953). System of State Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to January 1, 1953.)
  30. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1953). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to September 1, 1953.)
  31. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1954). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1954.)
  32. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1955). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1955.)
  33. ^ a b State Highway Department of Georgia (1957). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to July 1, 1957.)
  34. ^ State Highway Department of Georgia (1960). State Highway System and Other Principal Connection Roads (PDF) (Map) (1960–61 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: State Highway Department of Georgia. OCLC 5673161. Retrieved March 19, 2017.  (Corrected to June 1, 1960.)
  35. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (2011). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (2011–12 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. OCLC 770217845. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 
  36. ^ Georgia Department of Transportation (2013). Official Highway and Transportation Map (PDF) (Map) (2013–14 ed.). Scale not given. Atlanta: Georgia Department of Transportation. Retrieved March 19, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Route map: Google

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