Georgia Women of Achievement

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The Georgia Women of Achievement (GWA) recognizes women natives or residents of the U.S. state of Georgia for their significant achievements or statewide contributions. The concept was first proposed by Rosalynn Carter in 1988. The first induction was in 1992 at Wesleyan College, and has continued annually. The induction ceremonies are held each year during March, designated as Women's History Month. The organization consists of a Board of Trustees and a Board of Selections.[1] Nominees must have been dead no less than ten years. Georgians, or those associated with Georgia, are selected based on the individual's impact on society. Nominations are proposed through documentation and an online nomination form, and must be submitted prior to October of any given year. GWA has traveling exhibits and speakers available upon request.[2]

Inductees[edit]

Georgia Women of Achievement
Name Image Birth–Death Year Area of achievement Ref(s)
Andrews, Eliza Frances (Fanny)Eliza Frances (Fanny) Andrews Eliza Frances Andrews.jpg (1840–1931) 2006 Botanist [3]
Andrews, Ludie ClayLudie Clay Andrews (1875–1969) 2018 First African-American registered nurse in Georgia. Founder of the Grady Municipal Training School of Colored Nurses [4]
Anthony, Madeleine KikerMadeleine Kiker Anthony (1903–1989) 2003 Historic preservationist who helped save the old courthouse on Dahlonega, Georgia, now the Dahlonega Gold Museum Historic Site [5]
Atkinson, Susan Cobb MiltonSusan Cobb Milton Atkinson (1860–1942) 1996 First Lady of Georgia, wife of Governor William Yates Atkinson; proponent of a state-supported college for women [6]
Bailey, Sarah RandolphSarah Randolph Bailey (1885–1972) 2012 Educator who organized the YWCA-sponsored Girl Reserves for African-American girls [7]
Bandy, Dicksie BradleyDicksie Bradley Bandy (1890–1971) 1993 Philanthropist, businesswoman, campaigned to restore the historic Cherokee Chief Vann House Historic Site [8]
Barrow, Elfrida De RenneElfrida De Renne Barrow (1884–1970) 2008 Author, poet [9]
Beasley, MathildaMathilda Beasley (1832–1903) 2004 Former slave, Georgia's first African-American Catholic nun [10]
Berry, Martha McChesneyMartha McChesney Berry Martha Berry in 1911.jpg (1866–1942) 1992 Founder of Berry College [11]
Black, Nellie PetersNellie Peters Black (1851–1919) 1996 Women's issues organizer and activist [12]
Bosomworth, Mary MusgroveMary Musgrove Bosomworth (1700–1765) 1993 Creek Indian woman who served as an interpreter for James Oglethorpe [13]
Butler, Selena SloanSelena Sloan Butler Selena Sloan Butler.jpg (1872–1964) 1995 Founder of first African-American PTA [14]
Bynum, Margaret O.Margaret O. Bynum (1921–1982) 2007 Educator [15]
Carter, Carolyn MackenzieCarolyn Mackenzie Carter (1919–2010) 2017 First woman photojournalist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution [16]
Carter, Lillian GordyLillian Gordy Carter Lillian Carter.gif (1898–1983) 2011 Mother of President Jimmy Carter; Peace Corps worker; nurse; businesswoman [17]
Cobb, Helena Maud BrownHelena Maud Brown Cobb (1869–1922) 2003 Missionary, educator [18]
Coleman, Julia L.Julia L. Coleman (1889–1973) 2001 Educator [19]
Coley, Mary Francis HillMary Francis Hill Coley (1900–1966) 2011 Midwife, subject of All My Babies [20]
Connell, Wessie GertrudeWessie Gertrude Connell (1915–1987) 2002 Librarian [21]
Craft, Ellen SmithEllen Smith Craft Ellen Craft escaped slave.jpg (1826–1891) 1996 Escaped slave, educator [22]
Davis, Sallie EllisSallie Ellis Davis (1877–1950) 2000 Educator [23]
Dillon, Julia LesterJulia Lester Dillon (1871–1959) 2003 Landscape architect [24]
Dull, Henrietta StanleyHenrietta Stanley Dull (1863–1964) 2013 Caterer, journalist, author (as S. R. Dull) of Southern Cooking [25]
Durham, Cassandra PickettCassandra Pickett Durham (1824–1885) 1993 First woman in Georgia to earn a doctor of medicine degree [26]
Evans, Lettie PateLettie Pate Evans LettiePateWhiteheadEvans.jpg (1872–1953) 1998 Philanthropist, on board of directors of the Coca-Cola Bottling Co. [27]
Felton, Rebecca LatimerRebecca Latimer Felton Rebecca L. Felton.png (1835–1930) 1997 First woman to serve in the United States Senate; women's rights advocate [28]
Flisch, JuliaJulia Flisch (1861–1941) 1994 Journalist, women's rights advocate, educator [29]
Foster, Edith LenoraEdith Lenora Foster (1906–1996) 2007 Librarian, writer, historian [30]
Gay, Mary Ann HarrisMary Ann Harris Gay Mary Gay 1890.png (1829–1918) 1997 Author [31]
Graves, Amilee ChastainAmilee Chastain Graves (1910–1983) 2008 Publisher; first woman to hold elected office in Habersham County [32]
Hamilton, Grace TownsGrace Towns Hamilton (1907–1992) 2006 First African-American woman elected to the Georgia General Assembly [33]
Harpst, EthelEthel Harpst (1883–1967) 2012 Founder of the Ethel Harpst Home for children [34]
Harris, Corra Mae WhiteCorra Mae White Harris (1869–1935) 1996 Author [35]
Harris, Julia CollierJulia Collier Harris (1885–1967) 1998 Journalist, civic leader, editor [36]
Hart, Allie CarrollAllie Carroll Hart (1913–2003) 2015 Worked to preserve government records and photographs; established the Georgia Archives Institute for professional development; helped create the Southeast Archives and Records Conference; Faithful Service Award 1971 from Gov. Jimmy Carter, Outstanding Achievement Award from the Georgia Trust in 1997 and 2000, Brenau University Alumni Hall of Fame 2002 [37][38]
Hart, Nancy MorganNancy Morgan Hart Nancy Hart.jpg (1735–1830) 1997 Namesake of Hart County; frontier woman, American patriot, spy for the colonial army during the American War of Independence [39]
Haygood, Laura AskewLaura Askew Haygood (1845–1900) 2000 Educator, missionary [40]
Hays, Louise FrederickLouise Frederick Hays (1881–1951) 2004 Historian, director Georgia Department of Archives and History [41]
Heard, Sarah HarperSarah Harper Heard (1853–1919) 2016 Founder of a traveling library system [42]
Hillhouse, Sarah PorterSarah Porter Hillhouse (1763–1831) 2006 First woman editor and printer in Georgia [43]
Hope, Lugenia BurnsLugenia Burns Hope (1871–1947) 1996 Social reformer [44]
Howard, May duBignon StilesMay duBignon Stiles Howard (1894–1983) 2011 Health care [45]
Hunter, Anna ColquittAnna Colquitt Hunter (1892–1985) 1995 Historic preservationist [46]
Jewett, Mary GregoryMary Gregory Jewett (1908–1976) 2013 Founder and first President of the Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation [47]
Kaufman, RhodaRhoda Kaufman (1888–1956) 1998 Social activist [48]
Laney, Lucy CraftLucy Craft Laney (1854–1933) 1992 Educator, hospital administrator [49]
League, Ellamae EllisEllamae Ellis League (1899–1991) 2016 Architect [42]
Lee, Clermont HugerClermont Huger Lee (1914–2006) 2017 One of Georgia's first female landscape architects [16]
Lipscomb, Mary AnnMary Ann Lipscomb (1848–1918) 2010 Educator [50]
Logan, Carrie SteeleCarrie Steele Logan CarrieSteeleLogan1898.tif (1829–1900) 1998 Founded Carrie Steele Orphans' Home [51]
Longstreet, Helen DortchHelen Dortch Longstreet Helen Dortch Longstreet.jpg (1863–1962) 2004 Social activist [52]
Low, Juliette GordonJuliette Gordon Low Edward Hughes - Juliette Gordon Low - Google Art Project.jpg (1860–1927) 1992 Founder of Girl Scouts of the USA [53]
Mankin, Helen DouglasHelen Douglas Mankin Helen Mankin.jpg (1894–1956) 2007 First woman elected to the United States Congress from Georgia [54]
Matthews, Sara BranhamSara Branham Matthews (1888–1962) 2007 Scientist who discovered a treatment for spinal meningitis [55]
McCullers, CarsonCarson McCullers Carsonmccullers.jpg (1917–1967) 1994 Author [56]
McEachern, Lula DobbsLula Dobbs McEachern (1874–1949) 2002 Educator, missionary, philanthropist [57]
McIntire, Lucy BarrowLucy Barrow McIntire (1886–1975) 1997 Civic activist [58]
McKane, Alice WoodbyAlice Woodby McKane (1865–1948) 2005 First female doctor in Savannah [59]
Michael, Moina BelleMoina Belle Michael 00MoinaMichael.jpg (1869–1944) 1999 Originated the idea of using poppies to remember the war dead; honored with a United States postage stamp in 1948 [60]
Miller, Caroline PaffordCaroline Pafford Miller (1903–1992) 2009 Won the Pulitzer Prize in 1934 for her first novel, Lamb in His Bosom, the first Georgian to win the Pulitzer for Fiction. [61]
Mitchell, MargaretMargaret Mitchell Margaret Mitchell NYWTS.jpg (1900–1949) 1994 Author of Gone with the Wind [62]
Mosley, Ruth HartleyRuth Hartley Mosley (1886–1975) 1994 Philanthropist [63]
Murphy, Sarah McLendonSarah McLendon Murphy (1892–1954) 2004 Children's activist [64]
Myrick, Susan DowdellSusan Dowdell Myrick (1893–1978) 2008 Journalist, technical advisor for Gone with the Wind movie [65]
Napier, Viola RossViola Ross Napier (1881–1962) 1993 Member Georgia House of Representatives [66]
Nix, LucileLucile Nix (1903–1968) 2017 First library head for the state of Georgia [16]
Oliver, Beulah RuckerBeulah Rucker Oliver (1888–1963) 2012 Educator [67]
O'Connor, FlanneryFlannery O'Connor Flannery-O'Connor 1947.jpg (1925–1964) 1992 Author [68]
Pape, Nina AndersonNina Anderson Pape (1869–1944) 2005 Educator [69]
Pauley, Frances FreebornFrances Freeborn Pauley (1905–2003) 2015 League of Women Voters; President of the DeKalb League; Georgia League President; Executive Director of the Georgia Council on Human Relations; activist with the Office of Civil Rights who worked to implement the Civil Rights Act of 1964 [38]
Powers, HarrietHarriet Powers Harriet Powers 1901.png (1837–1910) 2009 Quilt maker, creator of the Bible Quilt now in the possession of the National Museum of American History [70]
Raines, Hazel JaneHazel Jane Raines (1916–1956) 1995 First woman in Georgia to earn a pilot's license (private license, and commercial license with Eastern Air Lines), stunt pilot, Lieutenant of Women Airforce Service Pilots during World War II, flew with the (British) Air Transport Auxiliary, trained Brazilian air students, recalled into active duty to fly in the Korean War, inducted into Georgia Aviation Hall of Fame [71][72]
Rainey, Gertrude Pridgett "Ma"Gertrude Pridgett "Ma" Rainey MaRainey.jpg (1886–1939) 1993 Blues singer [73]
Rankin, Jeannette PickeringJeannette Pickering Rankin RankinJ.jpg (1880–1973) 2005 First woman elected to the United States House of Representatives [74]
Sibley, CelestineCelestine Sibley (1914–1999) 2010 Journalist [75]
Smith, Lillian EugeniaLillian Eugenia Smith Lillian Eugenia Smith NYWTS.jpg (1897–1966) 1999 Author of Strange Fruit, a 1944 novel about interracial love [76]
Strickland, Alice HarrellAlice Harrell Strickland (1859–1947) 2002 Georgia's first woman mayor [77]
Taylor, Rebecca StilesRebecca Stiles Taylor (1879–1958) 2014 First president of the Savannah chapter of the National Association of Colored Women [78]
Taylor, Susie Baker KingSusie Baker King Taylor Susie King Taylor.jpg (1848–1912) 2018 Nurse and educator, first African-American Army nurse, wrote and self-published a memoir of her Civil War experiences. [4]
Thomas, Ella Gertrude ClantonElla Gertrude Clanton Thomas (1834–1907) 2014 Memoirist [79][78]
Tubman, Emily Harvie ThomasEmily Harvie Thomas Tubman (1794–1885) 1994 Founder of the first public high school for girls in Augusta [80]
Underwood, Katie HallKatie Hall Underwood (1884–1977) 2016 Midwife [42]
Usher, Bazoline EstelleBazoline Estelle Usher (1885–1992) 2014 Atlanta’s first Supervisor of Negro Schools [78]
Whitener, Catherine EvansCatherine Evans Whitener (1880–1964) 2001 Revived the textile art of tufting into a profitable business [81]
Wilburn, Leila RossLeila Ross Wilburn (1885–1967) 2003 Georgia's first registered female architect [82]
Williams, MadridMadrid Williams (1911–1993) 2010 First female president of the National Association of Bar Executives [83]
Williams, Mamie George S.Mamie George S. Williams (1872–1951) 2018 First African-American woman on the National Committee of the Republican Party. First woman to speak from the floor at the National Republican Convention. [4]
Wilson, Ellen Louise AxsonEllen Louise Axson Wilson ELWilson.jpg (1860–1914) 2000 First Lady of the United States, first wife of President Woodrow Wilson [84]
Woodruff, Nell Kendall HodgsonNell Kendall Hodgson Woodruff (1892–1968) 2015 American Red Cross; volunteer; first female member of the Emory Hospital Administration Committee; Eisenhower appointee to attend the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland; created the Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing [38]
Woodward, Emily BarneliaEmily Barnelia Woodward (1885–1970) 2004 Journalist [85]
Wylie, Lollie Belle MooreLollie Belle Moore Wylie (1858–1923) 2013 Writer [86]
Yarn, Jane HurtJane Hurt Yarn (1924–1995) 2009 Environmentalist, conservationist [87]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ "About Georgia Women of Achievement". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on 2013-02-08. 
  2. ^ "Georgia Women of Achievement". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Archived from the original on September 25, 2012. Retrieved August 10, 2012. 
  3. ^ Ford, Charlotte A. (Spring 1986). "Eliza Frances Andrews, Practical Botanist, 1840–1931". The Georgia Historical Quarterly. Georgia Historical Society. 70 (1): 63–80. JSTOR 40581467. (Subscription required (help)). 
  4. ^ a b c "2018 Induction Ceremony - Save the Date!". Georgia Women of Achievement. Retrieved January 22, 2018. 
  5. ^ Amerson (2006), pp. 28–29
  6. ^ Arnold (2009). pp. 138–39, 140, 142–43, 207
  7. ^ "Sarah Randolph Bailey". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on March 28, 2017. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  8. ^ Miles, Tiya (November 2011). ""Showplace of the Cherokee Nation": Race and the Making of a Southern House Museum". The Public Historian. University of California Press on behalf of the National Council on Public History. 33 (4): 11–34. JSTOR 10.1525/tph.2011.33.4.11. (Subscription required (help)). 
  9. ^ Wade, John D. (December 1933). "Reviewed Work: Georgia. A Pageant of Years by Mary Savage Anderson, Elfrida De Renne Barrow, Elizabeth Mackay Screven, Martha Gallaudet Waring". The Georgia Historical Quarterly. Georgia Historical Society. 17 (4): 318–319. JSTOR 40576287. (Subscription required (help)). 
  10. ^ Goode-Walker, Sheehy, Wallace (2011), pp. 282–283
  11. ^ Mathis, Doyle; Dickey, Ouida. "Martha Berry". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 4, 2006. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  12. ^ Shellman, Carey O. "Nellie Peters Black". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on August 19, 2012. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  13. ^ Frank, Andrew K. "Mary Musgrove". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on January 16, 2010. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  14. ^ Hightower-Langston (2002), pp. 33–34
  15. ^ "Margaret Bynum". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  16. ^ a b c "Former Moultrian honored for photography". Moultrie Observer. March 2, 2017. Archived from the original on April 19, 2017. Retrieved April 9, 2017. 
  17. ^ Patton, Charlie (April 29, 2008). "Carter Recalls His Mother, Miss Lillian, in New Book; She Inspired and Exasperated Him, He Says in an Interview". The Florida Times Union. The Florida Times Union – via Questia (subscription required). Archived from the original on January 11, 2018. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  18. ^ Smith (1996), pp. 113–114
  19. ^ "Julia L. Coleman". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  20. ^ Thompson, Varney (2016), pp. 10–12
  21. ^ Carpenter, Cathy. "Wessie Connell (1915–1987)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  22. ^ Samuels, Ellen (Fall 2006). ""A Complication of Complaints": Untangling Disability, Race, and Gender in William and Ellen Craft's Running A Thousand Miles for Freedom". MELUS. The Society for the Study of the Multi-Ethnics Literature of the United States – via Questia (subscription required). 31 (3): 15. Archived from the original on 2016-02-03. 
  23. ^ "Sallie Ellis Davis". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on June 4, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  24. ^ "Julia Lester Dillon". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  25. ^ Ferris (2014), pp. 202–204
  26. ^ Anderson (2006), pp. 57–63
  27. ^ Thomas, Frances Taliaferro. "Lettie Pate Whitehead Evans". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 21, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  28. ^ "Rebecca Latimer Felton". Biographical Directory. United States Congress. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  29. ^ Holliman, Irene V. "Julia Anna Flisch". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 17, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  30. ^ "Edith Lenora Foster". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  31. ^ "Mary Ann Harris Gay". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on February 24, 2014. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  32. ^ "Amilee Chastain Graves". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  33. ^ Lefever, Harry G. (Summer 1998). "Reviewed Work: Grace Towns Hamilton and the Politics of Southern Change by Lorraine Nelson Spritzer, Jean B. Bergmark". The Journal of Negro History. Association for the Study of African American Life and History. 83 (3): 213–215. JSTOR 2649021. (Subscription required (help)). 
  34. ^ "Ethel Harpst". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  35. ^ Oglesby, Catherine. "Corra Harris (1869–1935)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on January 5, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  36. ^ "Julia Collier Harris Papers, 1921–1955". Five College Archives & Manuscript Collections. Archived from the original on February 25, 2014. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  37. ^ "Allie Carroll Hart Obituary". Athens Banner-Herald. OnLine Athens. July 25, 2003. Archived from the original on January 11, 2018. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  38. ^ a b c Purser, Becky (March 5, 2015). "Georgia Women of Achievement inductees honored at Wesleyan ceremony". Macon Telegraph. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  39. ^ Coulter, E. Merton (June 1955). "Nancy Hart, Georgia Heroine of the Revolution: The Story of the Growth of A Tradition". The Georgia Historical Quarterly. Georgia Historical Society. 39 (2): 118–15. JSTOR 40577562. (Subscription required (help)). 
  40. ^ Boyer, James, James (1971), pp. 167-169
  41. ^ "Louise Frederick Hays". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  42. ^ a b c Corley, Laura (March 6, 2016). "Three Georgia women to be honored posthumously Wednesday at Wesleyan". Macon Telegraph. Archived from the original on March 8, 2016. Retrieved April 9, 2017. 
  43. ^ "Sarah Porter Hillhouse". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on January 4, 2014. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  44. ^ "Lugenia Burns Hope (1871-1947)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on January 7, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  45. ^ "May duBignon Stiles Howard". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on January 27, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  46. ^ "Anna Colquitt Hunter". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  47. ^ "Jewett, Mary Gregory". Georgia Women of Achievement. Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on March 24, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  48. ^ "Rhoda Kaufman". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  49. ^ Leslie, Kent Anderson. "Lucy Craft Laney (1854-1933)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on January 5, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  50. ^ Case (2009), pp. 272–296
  51. ^ Henson, Tevi Taliaferro. "Carrie Steele Logan (1829-1900)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on December 14, 2014. Retrieved January 17, 2015. 
  52. ^ Laas, Virginia J. (Winter 2004). "Blood and Irony: Southern White Women's Narratives of the Civil War, 1861-1937". The Arkansas Historical Quarterly. Arkansas Historical Association, Department of History, University of Arkansas – via Questia (subscription required). 63. No. 4: 445. 
  53. ^ Claridge, Laura (Spring 2012). "Reviewed Work: JULIETTE GORDON LOW: The Remarkable Founder of the Girl Scouts by Stacy A. Cordery". The Wilson Quarterly. Wilson Quarterly. 38 (2): 90–92. JSTOR 41933894. (Subscription required (help)). 
  54. ^ Spritzer, Lorraine Nelson. "Helen Douglas Mankin". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 4, 2006. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  55. ^ "Sara Branham Matthews". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  56. ^ Malone, Michael (Spring 2001). "Reviewed Work: Carson Mccullers: A Life by Josyane Savigneau, Joan E. Howard". The Wilson Quarterly. Wilson Quarterly. 25 (2): 117–118. JSTOR 40260197. (Subscription required (help)). 
  57. ^ "Lula Dobbs McEachern". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  58. ^ "Lucy Barrow McIntire". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  59. ^ Howard-Oglesby, Pamela; Roberts, Brenda L (2010). Savannah's Black First Ladies, Vol I. Outskirts Press. p. 69. ISBN 978-1-4327-3112-0. OCLC 643107732. Archived from the original on 2014-10-27. 
  60. ^ Tinling (1986), p. 148
  61. ^ Wright, Emily (January 1, 2004). "Caroline Miller, 1903-1992". Southern Quarterly. Southern Quarterly – via Questia (subscription required). 42 (2): 109. 
  62. ^ Tinling (1986), pp. 139,147,149
  63. ^ "Ruth Hartley Mosley". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  64. ^ "Sarah McLendon Murphy". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on March 5, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  65. ^ Morris, Susan D. "Susan Dowdell Myrick". New Georgie Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 19, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  66. ^ Carpenter, Cathy. "Viola Ross Napier". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 19, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  67. ^ "Beulah Oliver". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  68. ^ Tinling (1986), p. 151
  69. ^ "Nina Anderson Pape". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  70. ^ Callahan, Ashley. "Harriet Powers". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 4, 2006. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  71. ^ Saba, Natalie D. "Hazel Raines". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 20, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  72. ^ Chirhart, Ann Short (2014). "Hazel Jane Raines (1916–1956): Georgia's First Woman Pilot and her "Band of Sisters" during World War II". Georgia Women: Their Lives and Times. University of Georgia Press. pp. 260–280. ISBN 978-0-8203-4700-4. Archived from the original on 2017-04-26 – via Project MUSE. (Subscription required (help)). 
  73. ^ Orr, N. Lee. "Ma Rainey". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 4, 2006. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  74. ^ Tinling (1986), p. 664
  75. ^ Purcell, Kim. "Celestine Sibley". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 20, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  76. ^ Clayton, Bruce. "Lillian Smith". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 4, 2006. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  77. ^ "Alice Harrell Strickland". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on July 13, 2013. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  78. ^ a b c Thomas, Kenneth H., Jr. (March 29, 2014). "Georgia Women of Achievement seeks nominations". Atlanta Journal-Constitution. Archived from the original on January 11, 2018. Retrieved May 5, 2017. 
  79. ^ Rohrer, Katherine E. "Ella Gertrude Clanton Thomas (1834-1907)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on March 6, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  80. ^ Tinling (1986), p. 142
  81. ^ Tamasy (2010), pp. 4–6
  82. ^ Marter (2011), p. 223
  83. ^ "Madrid Williams". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on April 7, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  84. ^ Montgomery, Erick D. "Ellen Wilson". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on October 21, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 
  85. ^ Gurr, Steve. "Emily Woodward (1885-1970)". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Georgia Humanities Council and the University of Georgia Press. Archived from the original on March 3, 2016. Retrieved January 1, 2016. 
  86. ^ "Lollie Belle Moore Wylie". Georgia Women of Achievement. Archived from the original on April 22, 2016. Retrieved January 17, 2016. 
  87. ^ "Jane Hurt Yarn". New Georgia Encyclopedia. Archived from the original on October 21, 2012. Retrieved August 9, 2012. 

References[edit]

Further information[edit]

  • Mary Francis Hill Coley (2007). All My Babies : A Midwife's Own Story (DVD). Image Entertainment. OCLC 141251448. 
  • Craft, Ellen; Craft, William (2012). Running a Thousand Miles for Freedom. Lanham, MD: Start Publishing LLC. ISBN 978-1-62558-532-5. 
  • Hawkins, Regina Trice (1996). Hazel Jane Raines, Pioneer Lady of Flight. Mercer University Press. ISBN 978-0-86554-532-8. 
  • Myrick, Susan; Harwell, Richard Barksdale (1982). White Columns in Hollywood: Reports from the Gone With the Wind Sets. Mercer University Press. ISBN 978-0-86554-044-6. 
  • Rouse, Jacqueline Anne (1989). Lugenia Burns Hope, Black Southern Reformer. University of Georgia Press. ISBN 978-0-8203-1082-4. 
  • Spritzer, Lorraine Nelson (1982). The Belle of Ashby Street: Helen Douglas Mankin and Georgia Politics. University of Georgia Press. ISBN 978-0-8203-3254-3. 
  • Spritzer, Lorraine Nelson; Bergmark, Jean B (1997). Grace Towns Hamilton and the Politics of Southern Change. University of Georgia Press. ISBN 978-0-8203-1889-9. 

External links[edit]