Georgia national rugby union team

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For the sevens team, see Georgia national rugby sevens team.
Georgia
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) Lelos
Emblem Borjgali
Union Georgian Rugby Union
Head coach Milton Haig
Captain Mamuka Gorgodze
Most caps Merab Kvirikashvili (100)
Top scorer Merab Kvirikashvili (785)
Top try scorer Mamuka Gorgodze (26)
Home stadium Mikheil Meskhi Stadium
First colours
Second colours
World Rugby ranking
Current 12 (as of 21 November 2016)
Highest 11 (2016)
Lowest 23 (2009)
First international
Georgia 16–3 Zimbabwe
(Kutaisi, Georgia; 12 September 1989)
Biggest win
Georgia 98–3 Czech Republic
(Tbilisi, Georgia; 8 April 2007)
Biggest defeat
Georgia 6–84 England
(Perth, Australia; 12 October 2003)
World Cup
Appearances 4 (First in 2003)
Best result 3rd in the pool in 2015
Website www.rugby.ge

The Georgia national rugby union team (Georgian: საქართველოს მორაგბეთა ეროვნული ნაკრები) nicknamed The Lelos or Men of Borjgali represents Georgia in international rugby union. Rugby union in Georgia is administered by the Georgian Rugby Union. The team takes part in the annual Rugby Europe Championship (previously named European Nations Cup) and participates in the Rugby World Cup, which takes place every four years.

Georgia is currently considered a second tier rugby union nation and is one of the world's fastest growing rugby nations. The Lelos participate in the Rugby Europe Championship, winning the tournament in 2001, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016 seasons. The bulk of the national squad are based in France, in both the Top 14 and lower divisions. This is a practice that was popularized by former national team coach, Claude Saurel, a Frenchman.

Rugby is one of the most popular sports in Georgia. The national team qualified for the Rugby World Cup four times, first in 2003 – playing against rugby powers such as England and South Africa. The Lelos recorded their first ever World Cup win in 2007 Rugby World Cup, where they beat Namibia 30–0. As of 6 February 2017, Georgia are ranked 12th in the world by World Rugby. Since 2013, Georgia has hosted the World Rugby Tbilisi Cup.

History[edit]

Soviet era[edit]

There were unsuccessful attempts to introduce rugby union into Georgia in 1928 and also in 1940 and in 1948.

Rugby's popularity in Georgia might be explained by its resemblance to the traditional Georgian game named "Lelo" or "Lelo Burti" (meaning "Field Ball"). This game was played in Georgia from ancient times and is still played on occasions in rural areas. A field ("Lelo") was selected between two river creeks which represented a playing ground. Two teams, usually consisting of the male population of neighboring villages, would face each other. The number of players from each side was not set, but included any able men each village could summon. A large, heavy ball was placed in the middle of the field and the goal of the game was to carry it over the river creek of the opposing side.

The Georgia Rugby Union was founded in 1964, but until the late 1980s it was part of the Soviet Union's rugby federation. The rugby union connection between France and Georgia started as links were established by the then powerful French Communist Party and many other left-wing organisations. Georgia initially did not have its own team and its best players would play for the USSR team.

In 1988 Georgia produced their first national sevens side. In September 1989, Georgia got together with other FIRA countries to host a tour by Zimbabwe. Zimbabwe's first match on the tour was in the wet against Georgia in Kutaisi, west of Tbilisi, which Georgia won 16–3. The next year Georgia went to Zimbabwe where they played two tests, losing the first in Bulawayo and winning the second 26–10 in Harare.

1990s[edit]

On 9 April 1991 Georgia declared independence from the Soviet Union. Georgia was now a rugby union nation but getting matches was not easy: the old Soviet team continued under the name Commonwealth of Independent States. Georgia were limited to the odd game against Ukraine until they gained membership of the World Rugby in 1992.

French coach, Claude Saurel, first arrived in Georgia in 1997 with a brief to assess the standard of sport; he and his development team have helped boost the profile of the sport. Saurel went on to work with the Georgia national rugby sevens team, until he was appointed as the national coach in the summer of 1999.

Georgia's 1998 loss to Romania saw them play a two legged repechage play-off against Tonga to qualify for the 1999 World Cup. On that occasion Georgia lost the first leg 37–6 in Nukuʻalofa before a 28–27 win in Tbilisi. This was not enough and Georgia failed to qualify.

2000s: World Cup play[edit]

Georgian team celebrating victory

After France and Italy dropped from the reborn European Nations Cup, Georgia became a major force in the tournament. In 2000, Georgia finished second in the competition, finishing behind Romania. The following year, Georgia improved upon this, winning all five of their matches during the 2000–01 tournament, and thus finishing at the top of the table. They clinched the title by beating Romania away 31–20 on the final day. Rugby union took off in the country, the travel and opportunities to land lucrative contracts in France made rugby union a glamorous pursuit in Georgia. Georgia placed second in the 2001–02 tournament. When Georgia played Russia in the European Nations Cup 65,000 people crammed into the national stadium in Tbilisi.

Georgian first made an impact at Rugby Sevens by finishing a respectable 10th in the 2001 edition of the Rugby World Cup Sevens in Argentina.

In October 2002 Georgia faced Russia, in what was at the time one of the most important clashes ever between the two national sides. The victorious nation would head to the 2003 Rugby World Cup, and the loser would be relegated to fight it out for a repechage position. Neither nation had ever been to a World Cup, though Georgia had come close in 1999. 50,000[1] spectators turned out to the national stadium. Both nations kicked penalty goals in the first half, but Russia moved ahead with a 13–9 lead through a try, but Georgia were able to score a try of their own just before half time, with Levan Tsabadze putting them in front 14–13 at the break. Georgia held on, winning 17–13, a victory which sparked celebrations throughout the capital.[2] Three of the 75 French-based Georgian players were denied permission to play in the tournament and were suspended. Another five were sacked and arrived in Australia as free agents. In a warm-up game held in Asti the Georgians lost to Italians 31–22.

In the 2003 Rugby World Cup, Georgia were grouped into pool C alongside giants – South Africa and England. They suffered their heaviest ever defeat when beaten by England 84–6 in their opening game. In their second match, Samoa comfortably eased to a 46–9 victory. Although they performed well against the Springboks (losing 46–19) they were disappointingly defeated by Uruguay 24–12, in a match that they were expected to win. They lost all four of their matches but had impressed against South Africa. Despite the sad financial state of their union, qualification has seen the sport's profile rise throughout Georgia.

Lineout for Georgia during their loss to Ireland in the 2007 World Cup.

In the 2007 Rugby World Cup Georgia were drawn against Argentina, Ireland, Namibia and tournament hosts France in Pool D. The team recorded their first win in the rugby world cup with a 30–0 win over Namibia in their Pool D match at Stade Felix-Bollaert. The foundation for the victory was laid by Georgia's experienced forward pack who wore down their opponents at the breakdown. The 2007 world cup campaign is also well remembered for Georgians by brilliant display against Ireland, where Georgia narrowly lost the match 10–14. The tournament was over with 7–64 defeat to hosts France on 30 September.

2010–present[edit]

At 2011 Rugby World Cup, Georgia's Pool B included England, Argentina and Scotland, as well as local rivals Romania. Despite the close nature of their pool, Georgia were impressive in all matches, including a tight match against Scotland which was lost 15–6, thus missing a bonus point narrowly and a 41–10 loss against England, which featured a man-of-the-match performance by flanker Mamuka Gorgodze. Georgia went on to record only their second ever Rugby World Cup win against Romania, winning 25–9 with another man-of-the-match performance by Mamuka Gorgodze. Georgia finished their campaign with a strong showing against Argentina, leading 7–5 at half time before conceding 20 unanswered points to lose 25–7. Thus Georgia finished their campaign with 1 win and 3 losses.

In the 2015 Rugby World Cup Georgia played against Tonga, Argentina, title holders New Zealand and the top African qualifier Namibia in Pool C. The group opener finished with Georgia’s 17–10 victory against Tonga. It totally paid off for what the Lelos have worked so hard during RWC preparations. With this history-maker fixture, they won the third World Cup match in the history of Georgian Rugby. Georgia lost second match against Argentina 9–54, although in the first half finished 14–9 for the Pumas. In the third match Georgia were defeated by New Zealand 43–10 in Cardiff. Again in the first half The Lelos held very well against the mighty All Blacks, with score remaining 22–10 for the world champions. In the last match Georgia defeated Namibia 17–16, for the first time ever finished the group on third place with two wins and two defeats and secured their qualification for 2019 Rugby World Cup.

In 2016, Georgia once again cemented its claim to be the seventh best national rugby team in Europe, when they won the European Nations Cup for the sixth consecutive time, with 10 wins from 10 matches. In the 2016 mid-year internationals the Lelos traveled to pacific islands for the first time and finished the historic tour unbeaten with 19–19 draw against Samoa, 23–20 victory against Tonga and 14–3 victory against Fiji.

Lelo[edit]

The team's nickname, The Lelos, comes from lelo burti, a traditional Georgian sport with strong similarities to rugby. Lelo has been adopted as the Georgian word for "try" (the highest-valued score in rugby). One standard cheer of Georgian rugby union fans is Lelo, Lelo, Sakartvelo (Try, Try, Georgia).

Lelo has its roots in pagan times; the ball symbolized the Sun, one of the cesestial bodies worshipped throughout the Middle East. The game used to be a proven form of military exercise, it was adopted by the Orthodox Church to such an extent that the Priest used to bless a red – the most revered Christian colour – ball at Easter and throw it up to the players. Village vied with village, Uppies with Downies, married men with betrotheds and bachelors, and sometimes teams were selected on tribal lines. The goal of the Lelo-burti was to bring the ball to a pre-marked place, that is Lelo. Hence, both an 'in-goal area' and a 'try' in contemporary Georgian are referred to as 'Lelo'.

Record[edit]

Overall[edit]

Top 30 rankings as of 20 February 2017[3]
Rank Change* Team Points
1 Steady  New Zealand 94.78
2 Steady  England 91.02
3 Steady  Australia 86.35
4 Steady  Ireland 83.75
5 Steady  Wales 82.44
6 Steady  South Africa 81.79
7 Steady  France 80.99
8 Steady  Scotland 80.90
9 Steady  Argentina 79.91
10 Steady  Fiji 76.46
11 Steady  Japan 74.22
12 Steady  Georgia 74.14
13 Steady  Tonga 71.94
14 Steady  Italy 71.81
15 Steady  Samoa 71.25
16 Steady  Romania 67.68
17 Steady  United States 66.76
18 Increase2  Russia 63.00
19 Steady  Namibia 62.78
20 Decrease2  Canada 62.15
21 Steady  Spain 61.12
22 Steady  Germany 60.73
23 Steady  Uruguay 60.36
24 Steady  Kenya 59.28
25 Steady  Portugal 57.27
26 Increase1  Hong Kong 56.50
27 Decrease1  Belgium 56.11
28 Steady  South Korea 55.50
29 Steady  Netherlands 54.93
30 Steady  Chile 53.94
*Change from the previous week
Georgia's historical rankings
Georgia IRB World Rankings.png
Source: World Rugby - Graph updated to 6 February 2017[3]

Georgia has won 120 of their 197 representative matches, a winning record of 60.91%. Since World Rankings were introduced by World Rugby in September 2003, Georgia have occupied below number ten the majority of the time.

Below is table of the representative rugby matches played by a Georgia national team at test level up until 19 February 2017.[4]

Opponent Played Won Lost Drawn Win % For Aga Diff
 Argentina 4 0 4 0 0.00% 37 141 −104
Argentina Argentina Jaguars 3 2 1 0 66.67% 54 61 −7
 Barbarians 1 0 1 0 0.00% 19 28 −9
 Belgium 3 3 0 0 100.00% 83 19 +64
 Bulgaria 1 1 0 0 100.00% 70 8 +62
 Canada 5 2 3 0 40.00% 78 119 −41
 Chile 2 1 1 0 50.00% 53 36 +17
 Croatia 1 1 0 0 100.00% 29 15 +14
 Czech Republic 8 8 0 0 100.00% 310 58 +252
 Denmark 1 1 0 0 100.00% 19 8 +11
 England 2 0 2 0 0.00% 16 125 −109
 Fiji 2 1 1 0 50.00% 33 27 +6
 France 1 0 1 0 0.00% 7 64 −57
France French Universities 1 1 0 0 100.00% 24 20 +4
 Germany 6 6 0 0 100.00% 302 32 +270
 Ireland 4 0 4 0 0.00% 31 196 −165
Ireland Ireland Wolfhounds 1 0 1 0 0.00% 5 40 −35
Ireland Emerging Ireland 2 0 2 0 0.00% 27 65 −38
 Italy 1 0 1 0 0.00% 22 31 −9
 Italy XV 1 0 1 0 0.00% 7 51 −44
 Italy A 5 2 3 0 40.00% 71 83 −12
 Emerging Italy 2 1 1 0 50.00% 44 36 +8
 Japan 5 1 4 0 20.00% 96 122 −26
 Kazakhstan 1 1 0 0 100.00% 17 5 +12
 Latvia 1 1 0 0 100.00% 28 3 +25
 Luxembourg 1 0 0 1 0.00% 10 10 +0
 Moldova 1 1 0 0 100.00% 47 5 +42
 Morocco 1 1 0 0 100.00% 20 10 +10
 Namibia 5 4 1 0 80.00% 112 73 +39
 Netherlands 4 3 1 0 75.00% 164 64 +100
 New Zealand 1 0 1 0 0.00% 10 43 -33
 Poland 2 0 2 0 0.00% 29 52 −23
 Portugal 20 14 4 2 70.00% 469 268 +201
 Romania 20 11 8 1 55.00% 385 348 +37
 Russia 20 18 1 1 90.00% 500 231 +269
 Samoa 4 2 1 1 50.00% 64 96 −32
 Scotland 2 0 2 0 0.00% 22 58 −36
 Scotland A 2 1 1 0 50.00% 25 90 −65
 South Africa 1 0 1 0 0.00% 19 46 −27
South Africa South Africa A 1 0 1 0 0.00% 17 31 −14
South Africa Southern Kings 1 0 1 0 0.00% 17 31 −14
South Africa South Africa President's XV 1 0 1 0 0.00% 16 21 −5
South Africa Emerging Springboks 2 0 2 0 0.00% 10 35 −25
 Spain 17 13 3 1 76.47% 547 260 +287
  Switzerland 1 1 0 0 100.00% 22 21 +1
 Tonga 5 3 2 0 60.00% 83 117 −34
 Ukraine 9 9 0 0 100.00% 281 63 +218
 United States 4 1 3 0 25.00% 75 109 −34
 Uruguay 5 3 2 0 60.00% 85 72 +13
 Zimbabwe 3 2 1 0 66.67% 58 35 +23
Total 197 120 70 7 60.91% 4569 3582 +987

World Cup[edit]

Georgia has competed in four Rugby World Cup tournaments. Their first appearance was in 2003 when they were placed in Pool C with England, South Africa, Uruguay and Samoa. In 2007 Georgia recorded their first win in the Rugby World Cup with a 30–0 win over Namibia in their Pool D match at Stade Bollaert-Delelis. The Lelos best performance was in 2015, where they finished third in a group for the first time. Georgia have to date won four World Cup matches and lost twelve.

World Cup record World Cup Qualification record
Year Round P W D L F A P W D L F A
AustraliaNew Zealand 1987 Part of USSR: Not an independent country -
United KingdomIrelandFrance 1991 Part of USSR: Not an independent country Part of USSR: Not an independent country
South Africa 1995 Did not qualify 2 0 0 2 15 38
Wales 1999 8 4 0 4 131 221
Australia 2003 Pool Stage 4 0 0 4 46 200 2 1 0 1 31 76
France 2007 Pool Stage 4 1 0 3 50 111 14 10 1 3 426 182
New Zealand 2011 Pool Stage 4 1 0 3 48 90 10 8 1 1 326 132
England 2015 Pool Stage 4 2 0 2 53 123 10 9 1 0 286 106
Japan 2019 Automatically qualified Automatically qualified
Total 4/8 16 4 0 12 197 524 46 32 3 11 1215 755

Rugby Europe Championship[edit]

Georgia compete annually in the Rugby Europe Championship (previously named European Nations Cup). They won the tournament nine times in 2001, 2008, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016

ENC champions
Georgian players celebrate beating Russia

Results correct up until 19 March 2016

Season G W D L PF PA +/− Pts Pos
2000 5 3 0 2 145 105 +73 11 2nd
2001 5 5 0 0 167 68 +99 15 1st
2001–02 5 3 1 1 184 84 +100 12 2nd
2003–04 10 5 1 4 193 148 +45 21 3rd
2004–06 10 8 0 2 353 125 +228 26 2nd
2006–08 10 9 0 1 292 114 +178 28 1st
2008–09 5 4 1 0 170 80 +90 14 1st
2010 5 4 0 1 158 50 +108 13 2nd
2011 5 5 0 0 168 35 +133 22 1st
2012 5 4 0 1 148 48 +100 20 1st
2013 5 4 1 0 135 61 +74 19 1st
2014 5 5 0 0 151 45 +106 22 1st
2015 5 5 0 0 158 42 +116 21 1st
2016 5 5 0 0 188 33 +155 24 1st
2017 ' '
Total 85 69 4 12 2610 1038 +1572 268 1st

Antim Cup[edit]

Main article: Antim Cup

The Antim Cup is contested between Georgia and Romania each time the teams meet in a senior international match other than World Cup matches or qualifiers. The holder retains the cup unless the challenger wins the match, and there is no extra time in case of a draw. It is named after the Romanian Orthodox Metropolitan Anthim the Iberian, who came from Georgia.

Players[edit]

Current squad[edit]

On 26 January, Head Coach Milton Haig named a 31-man squad for the 2017 Rugby Europe Championship.

Head Coach: New Zealand Milton Haig
Ass. Coach: Georgia (country) Levan Maisashvili
Backs Coach: Australia Richard Graham
Forwards Coach: Australia Brad Harris
Defence Coach:Republic of Ireland Michael Bradley


Caps updated: 25 February 2017

Player Position Date of Birth (Age) Caps Club/province
Mamukashvili, ShalvaShalva Mamukashvili Hooker (1990-10-02) 2 October 1990 (age 26) 43 France Toulon
Bregvadze, JabaJaba Bregvadze Hooker (1987-04-23) 23 April 1987 (age 29) 40 England Worcester
Mataradze, TornikeTornike Mataradze Prop (1996-10-18) 18 October 1996 (age 20) 2 France Lyon OU
Tetrashvili, GiorgiGiorgi Tetrashvili Prop (1993-08-31) 31 August 1993 (age 23) 6 France Brive
Melikidze, GiorgiGiorgi Melikidze Prop (1996-05-24) 24 May 1996 (age 20) 3 France Stade Français
Bekoshvili, SosoSoso Bekoshvili Prop (1993-11-03) 3 November 1993 (age 23) 2 France Brive
Tabidze, LashaLasha Tabidze Prop (1997-07-04) 4 July 1997 (age 19) 1 France Bordeaux
Nemsadze, GiorgiGiorgi Nemsadze Lock (1984-09-26) 26 September 1984 (age 32) 67 England Bristol
Mikautadze, KonstantinKonstantin Mikautadze Lock (1991-07-01) 1 July 1991 (age 25) 45 France Montpellier
Tcheishvili, NodarNodar Tcheishvili Lock (1990-11-13) 13 November 1990 (age 26) 6 Georgia (country) Lelo Saracens
Shubitidze, SabaSaba Shubitidze Flanker (1994-04-07) 7 April 1994 (age 22) 7 Georgia (country) Academy
Lomidze, LashaLasha Lomidze Flanker (1992-06-30) 30 June 1992 (age 24) 26 France Béziers
Tkhilaishvili, GiorgiGiorgi Tkhilaishvili Flanker (1991-04-08) 8 April 1991 (age 25) 35 Georgia (country) Batumi
Tsutskiridze, GiorgiGiorgi Tsutskiridze Flanker (1996-11-27) 27 November 1996 (age 20) 1 France Brive
Giorgadze, OtarOtar Giorgadze Flanker (1996-03-02) 2 March 1996 (age 20) 3 France Clermont
Gorgadze, BekaBeka Gorgadze Number 8 (1996-02-08) 8 February 1996 (age 21) 9 France Stade Montois
Lobzhanidze, VasilVasil Lobzhanidze Scrum-half (1996-10-14) 14 October 1996 (age 20) 18 France CA Brive
Begadze, GiorgiGiorgi Begadze Scrum-half (1986-03-04) 4 March 1986 (age 30) 53 Georgia (country) Qochebi Bolnisi
Aprasidze, GelaGela Aprasidze Scrum-half (1998-01-14) 14 January 1998 (age 19) 1 Georgia (country) Lelo Saracens
Malaghuradze, LashaLasha Malaghuradze Fly-half (1986-01-02) 2 January 1986 (age 31) 75 Russia Krasny Yar
Khmaladze, LashaLasha Khmaladze Fly-half (1988-01-20) 20 January 1988 (age 29) 50 Georgia (country) AIA Kutaisi
Jinchvelashvili, RevazRevaz Jinchvelashvili Fly-half (1995-08-18) 18 August 1995 (age 21) 3 Georgia (country) AIA Kutaisi
Liparteliani, BadriBadri Liparteliani Centre (1995-03-17) 17 March 1995 (age 21) 0 Georgia (country) Armazi Tbilisi
Koshadze, GiorgiGiorgi Koshadze Centre (1996-03-17) 17 March 1996 (age 20) 3 Georgia (country) Rustavi Kharebi
Sharikadze, MerabMerab Sharikadze Centre (1993-05-17) 17 May 1993 (age 23) 49 France Aurillac
Kacharava, DavitDavit Kacharava Centre (1985-01-16) 16 January 1985 (age 32) 96 Russia Yenisey-STM
Matiashvili, SosoSoso Matiashvili Wing (1993-11-21) 21 November 1993 (age 23) 0 Georgia (country) Academia
Todua, AlexanderAlexander Todua Wing (1987-11-02) 2 November 1987 (age 29) 61 Georgia (country) Lelo Saracens
Kvirikashvili, MerabMerab Kvirikashvili Fullback (1983-12-27) 27 December 1983 (age 33) 100 Georgia (country) Lelo Saracens
Svanidze, IrakliIrakli Svanidze Fullback (1996-07-02) 2 July 1996 (age 20) 1 Georgia (country) RC Jiki
Tsiklauri, BekaBeka Tsiklauri Fullback (1989-02-09) 9 February 1989 (age 28) 26 Georgia (country) Lokomotivi Tbilisi

Notable players[edit]

Ilia Zedginidze

Ilia Zedginidze – Played as a Number 8 and was a lineout specialist. A member of their inaugural World Cup side in 2003, he captained Georgia in the 2007 tournament, but was forced out of the squad because of an injury. This injury ultimately led to him announcing his retirement from international rugby, after gaining 48 caps. He returned to the squad in late 2008, playing against Scotland A and taking part in the 2009 European Nations Cup, where he scored a game-saving try against Portugal on 14 February 2009.

Malkhaz Urjukashvili – Moved to France, where he has been playing. He is one of the best players and scorers for Georgia, holding currently 65 caps for his National Team, with 18 tries and 300 points. His first match was a 29–15 win over Croatia, in Tbilisi, at 12 October 1997, aged only 17 years old. This made him one of the youngest players ever to be capped at international rugby level. He was present at the 2003 Rugby World Cup, playing three matches and scoring 9 points. In the game against England, he kicked a long range penalty that registered as Georgia's first Rugby World Cup points (England eventually won the game 84–6). He was called once again for the 2007 Rugby World Cup, playing in all the four matches and scoring one conversion. He continued to be a valuable player in the 2011 Rugby World Cup qualification, the third Georgia gained in a row.

Mamuka Gorgodze

Mamuka Gorgodze – Switched to rugby from basketball aged 17. His first club was Lelo in the Georgian Top League, he was soon selected for the Georgia national team and made his debut in 2003 against Spain, at the age of just 18 and not long after he started playing rugby. However he wasn't selected for Georgia's first appearance at the 2003 Rugby World Cup later that year.

In 2004 he became a regular fixture for the Georgia side. He was a regular in the Georgia side though and was selected for the 2007 Rugby World Cup. Gorgodze started three of Georgia's four matches at the World Cup, and was one of Georgia's star players.

Gorgodze changed position for Georgia to the back row. Gorgodze became a revelation at flanker during this season, and halfway through the season French newspaper L'Équipe commented that he improved his technique and became a mobile and unstoppable player. Gorgodze played a big role in Montpellier finishing the 2010–11 Top 14 season as runners up.[5] At the end of the season L'Équipe named him as the best foreigner in the league.

Gorgodze was selected for the Georgia squad for the 2011 Rugby World Cup and played all the Georgia matches and was named man of the match in two matches, against England and Romania.

Individual all-time records[edit]

Most caps[edit]

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Won Lost Draw %
1 Merab Kvirikashvili Fly-half 2003– 100 83 17 62 35 3 63.50
2 Davit Kacharava Centre 2006– 96 80 16 63 30 3 67.18
3 Giorgi Chkhaidze Flanker 2002– 94 77 17 61 30 3 66.48
4 Irakli Abuseridze Scrum-half 2000–2013 85 76 9 52 30 3 62.94
5 Tedo Zibzibadze Centre 2000–2014 77 65 12 48 25 4 64.93
6 Levan Datunashvili Lock 2004– 75 47 28 46 26 3 63.33
Lasha Malaghuradze Fly-half 2008– 75 44 31 53 23 2 68.00
8 Irakli Machkhaneli Wing 2002–2014 73 68 5 41 29 3 58.21
9 Malkhaz Urjukashvili Wing 1997–2011 70 66 4 40 30 0 57.14
10 Mamuka Gorgodze Number 8 2003– 69 64 5 44 21 4 66.66
Last updated: Georgia vs Germany, February 19, 2017. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[6]

Most tries[edit]

# Player Pos Span Mat Start Sub Pts Tries
1 Mamuka Gorgodze Number 8 2003– 69 64 5 130 26
2 Irakli Machkhaneli Wing 2002–2014 73 68 5 115 23
Tedo Zibzibadze Centre 2000–2014 77 65 12 115 23
3 Davit Kacharava Centre 2006– 96 80 16 100 20
4 Malkhaz Urjukashvili Wing 1997–2011 70 66 4 320 17
5 Bessik Khamashuridze Fullback 1998–2011 61 51 10 75 15
6 Merab Kvirikashvili Fly-half 2003– 100 83 17 785 14
7 Ilia Zedginidze Lock 1998–2011 66 64 2 65 13
8 Akvsenti Giorgadze Hooker 1996–2011 64 54 10 60 12
Gia Labadze Flanker 1996–2012 67 64 3 60 12
Giorgi Nemsadze Lock 2005– 67 45 22 60 12
Last updated: Georgia vs Germany, February 19, 2017. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[7]

Most points[edit]

# Player Pos Span Mat Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop
1 Merab Kvirikashvili Fly-half 2003– 100 785 14 140 142 3
2 Pavle Jimsheladze Fly-half 1995–2007 57 320 9 61 48 3
Malkhaz Urjukashvili Wing 1997–2011 70 320 17 47 46 1
4 Lasha Malaghuradze Fly-half 2008– 75 178 4 37 25 3
5 Mamuka Gorgodze Number 8 2003– 69 130 26 0 0 0
6 Irakli Machkhaneli Wing 2002–2014 73 115 23 0 0 0
Tedo Zibzibadze Centre 2000–2014 77 115 23 0 0 0
8 Nugzar Dzagnidze Fly-half 1989–1995 12 104 3 9 22 3
9 Davit Kacharava Centre 2006– 96 100 20 0 0 0
10 Beka Tsiklauri Fullback 2008– 26 93 4 11 15 2
Last updated: Georgia vs Germany, February 19, 2017. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[8]

Most matches as captain[edit]

# Player Pos Span Mat Won Lost Draw % Pts Tries
1 Ilia Zedginidze Lock 2002–2011 34 19 13 2 58.82 30 6
2 Irakli Abuseridze Scrum-half 2007–2012 31 21 9 1 69.35 15 3
3 Shalva Sutiashvili Flanker 2014– 14 13 0 1 96.42 5 1
4 Irakli Machkhaneli Wing 2013–2014 12 8 3 1 70.83 5 1
Zurab Mtchedlishvili Lock 1997–2007 12 7 5 0 58.33 10 2
Levan Tsabadze Prop 2001–2002 12 9 2 1 79.16 15 3
5 Dimitri Oboladze Flanker 1993–1998 11 6 4 1 59.09 5 1
Mamuka Gorgodze Number 8 2013– 11 4 7 0 36.36 10 2
7 Nugzar Dzagnidze Fullback 1991–1994 7 5 2 0 71.42 61 2
8 Gia Labadze Flanker 2000–2010 6 1 5 0 16.66 0 0
3 players on 3 matches
Last updated: Georgia vs Germany, February 19, 2017. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[9]

Most points in a match[edit]

# Player Pos Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Opposition Venue Date
1. Merab Kvirikashvili Full Back 32 2 11 0 0  Germany Georgia (country) Tbilisi 06/02/2010
2. Merab Kvirikashvili Full Back 24 1 2 5 0  Portugal Portugal Lisbon 08/02/2014
3. Paliko Jimsheladze Fly-half 23 1 0 6 0  Russia Russia Krasnodar 09/03/2003
Merab Kvirikashvili Fly-half 23 1 9 0 0  Czech Republic Georgia (country) Tbilisi 07/04/2007
5. Merab Kvirikashvili Fly-half 22 1 1 5 0  Japan Georgia (country) Tbilisi 17/11/2012
6. Malkhaz Urjukashvili Fly-half 20 0 7 2 0  Czech Republic Georgia (country) Kutaisi 12/06/2005
Lasha Malaghuradze Fly-half 20 1 6 1 0  Spain Spain Madrid 28/02/2009
8. Malkhaz Urjukashvili Full Back 19 1 4 2 0  Spain Georgia (country) Tbilisi 28/10/2006
4 players on 18 points
Last updated: Georgia vs Germany, February 19, 2017. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[10]

Most tries in a match[edit]

# Player Pos Pts Tries Conv Pens Drop Opposition Venue Date
1. Paliko Jimsheladze Wing 15 3 0 0 0  Bulgaria Bulgaria Sofia 23/03/1995
Archil Kavtarahvili Wing 15 3 0 0 0  Bulgaria Bulgaria Sofia 23/03/1995
Mamuka Gorgodze Number 8 15 3 0 0 0  Czech Republic Georgia (country) Kutaisi 12/06/2005
David Dadunashvili Hooker 15 3 0 0 0  Czech Republic Georgia (country) Tbilisi 07/04/2007
Malkhaz Urjukashvili Centre 15 3 0 0 0  Czech Republic Georgia (country) Tbilisi 07/04/2007
Mamuka Gorgodze Number 8 15 3 0 0 0  Spain Georgia (country) Tbilisi 26/04/2008
Zurab Zhvania Hooker 15 3 0 0 0  Germany Germany Heusenstamm 07/02/2015
Last updated: Georgia vs Germany, February 19, 2017. Statistics include officially capped matches only.[11]

Coaches[edit]

Name Span Matches Won Lost Draw %
France Claude Saurel 2000–2003 30 16 13 1 55%
Georgia (country) Malkhaz Cheishvili 2004–2007 35 19 14 2 57%
Australia Tim Lane 2008–2010 28 18 9 1 66%
Scotland Richie Dixon 2010–2011 12 9 3 0 75%
New Zealand Milton Haig 2012– 51 32 18 1 64%

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Georgia v Russia". ESPN scrum. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  2. ^ "When Georgia's XV came of age". rwc2003.irb.com. Archived from the original on 7 May 2006. Retrieved 29 November 2006. 
  3. ^ a b "World Rankings". World Rugby. Retrieved 20 February 2017. 
  4. ^ "Rugby Union - ESPN Scrum - Statsguru - Test matches - Team records". ESPN scrum. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  5. ^ Lopez, Julien. "Gorgodze percute, tamponne, caramélise, retourne. En plus, il franchit". Le Rugbynistère (in French). Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  6. ^ "Rugby Union | Georgia | Most matches | ESPN Scrum". ESPN scrum. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  7. ^ "Rugby Union | Georgia | Most individual tries | ESPN Scrum". ESPN scrum. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  8. ^ "Rugby Union | Georgia | Most individual points | ESPN Scrum". ESPN scrum. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  9. ^ "Rugby Union | Georgia | Most matches as a captain | ESPN Scrum". ESPN scrum. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  10. ^ "Rugby Union | Georgia | Most individual points in a match | ESPN Scrum". ESPN scrum. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 
  11. ^ "Rugby Union | Georgia | Most individual tries in a match | ESPN Scrum". ESPN scrum. Retrieved 10 February 2017. 

External links[edit]