Gerald Hocker

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Gerald Hocker
Member of the Delaware Senate
from the 20th district
Assumed office
January 8, 2013
Preceded by George Bunting
Member of the Delaware House of Representatives
from the 38th district
In office
January 14, 2003 – January 8, 2013
Preceded by Shirley Price
Succeeded by Ronald E. Gray
Personal details
Born (1948-01-09) January 9, 1948 (age 69)
Lewes, Delaware
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Residence Ocean View, Delaware
Alma mater University of Delaware
Website geraldhocker.com

Gerald W. Hocker[1] (born January 9, 1948 in Lewes, Delaware) is an American politician and a Republican member of the Delaware Senate since January 8, 2013 representing District 20.[2] Hocker has served in the Delaware General Assembly continuously since 2003, in the Delaware House of Representatives until 2013.

Education[edit]

Hocker earned his BS in business administration from the University of Delaware.

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 When Democratic Senator George Bunting retired and left the District 20 seat open, Hocker was unopposed for the September 11, 2012 Republican Primary and won the November 6, 2012 General election with 14,290 votes (68.0%) against Democratic nominee Richard Eakle.[3]
  • 2000 Hocker initially challenged incumbent Democratic Senator George Bunting for the Senate District 20 seat, winning the September 9, 2000 Republican Primary with 2,538 votes (77.9%),[4] but lost the November 7, 2000 General election to Bunting.[5]
  • 2002 Challenging incumbent Democratic Representative Shirley Price, Hocker was unopposed for the District 38 September 10, 2002 Republican Primary and won the three-way November 5, 2002 General election by 57 votes with 4,436 votes (49.8%) against Price and Libertarian candidate Donna Layfield Sinnamon.[6]
  • 2004 Hocker and Price were both unopposed for their September 11, 2004 primaries, setting up a rematch; Hocker won the November 2, 2004 General election with 7,653 votes (61.4%) against Price,[7] who lost her third attempt to regain the seat in 2012.
  • 2006 Hocker was unopposed for the September 12, 2006 Republican Primary and won the November 7, 2006 General election with 6,849 votes (72.3%) against Democratic nominee Robert Maddex.[8]
  • 2008 Hocker was unopposed for the September 9, 2008 Republican Primary and won the November 4, 2008 General election with 9,769 votes (72.1%) against Democratic nominee Mary Ryan.[9]
  • 2010 Hocker was unopposed for both the September 17, 2010 Republican Primary and the November 2, 2010 General election, winning with 9,371 votes.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Senator Gerald W. Hocker". Dover, Delaware: Delaware General Assembly. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Gerald Hocker's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  3. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Dover, Delaware: Delaware Commissioner of Elections. November 6, 2012. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  4. ^ "State of Delaware Primary Election Official Results". Dover, Delaware: Delaware Commissioner of Elections. September 9, 2000. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  5. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Dover, Delaware: Delaware Commissioner of Elections. November 7, 2000. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  6. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Dover, Delaware: Delaware Commissioner of Elections. November 5, 2002. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  7. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Dover, Delaware: Delaware Commissioner of Elections. November 2, 2004. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  8. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Dover, Delaware: Delaware Commissioner of Elections. November 7, 2006. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  9. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Dover, Delaware: Delaware Commissioner of Elections. November 4, 2008. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 
  10. ^ "State of Delaware General Election Official Results". Dover, Delaware: Delaware Commissioner of Elections. November 2, 2010. Retrieved November 13, 2013. 

External links[edit]