Gerry Klug

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Gerry Klug
Born Gerard Christopher Klug
Nationality American
Occupation Game designer

Gerard Christopher Klug is an American game designer who has worked primarily on role-playing games.

Career[edit]

Trained as a theatrical lighting designer, Gerry (Chris) Klug worked on Broadway, Off-Broadway, regional theater, opera, and toured with various 1970s rock bands.[1] He won two New Jersey Critic's Circle Awards for lighting designs at the New Jersey Theater Forum.[1]

Klug then began writing adventures for Simulations Publications's line of role-playing games.[1] He assisted with the design of Universe, Horror Hotel, Damocles Mission, and the second edition of DragonQuest.[1] Klug and Robert Kern had first talked about publishing an espionage role-playing game while working as designers at SPI; after SPI was purchased by TSR in 1982, eight SPI employees quit and Avalon Hill hired them to form a subsidiary called Victory Games.[2]:175 Klug began working on his espionage design again, which would have been called "License to Kill", but when Victory Games decided to pay for a James Bond license the game became James Bond 007 (1983).[2]:175 For a time, he was also design director for Victory Games.[1] Paul Jaquays, with David J. Ritchie and Klug, designed the adventure The Shattered Statue (1988) for Dungeons & Dragons, although the adventure was also compatible with DragonQuest.[3]

Chris Klug then began a career in the computer game field, with his credits including Star Trek DS9: Dominion Wars, Europa Universalis, Diamond Dreams Baseball, and Aidyn Chronicles: First Mage.[1] From 2001 through 2004, Klug served as creative director for EA's MMORPG, Earth & Beyond.[1] Klug was the creative director for Stargate Worlds and the creative consultant for Stargate: Resistance.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Klug, Chris "Gerry" (2007). "Napoleon's Last Battles". In Lowder, James. Hobby Games: The 100 Best. Green Ronin Publishing. pp. 213–216. ISBN 978-1-932442-96-0. 
  2. ^ a b Shannon Appelcline (2011). Designers & Dragons. Mongoose Publishing. ISBN 978-1-907702- 58-7. 
  3. ^ Schick, Lawrence (1991). Heroic Worlds: A History and Guide to Role-Playing Games. Prometheus Books. p. 92. ISBN 0-87975-653-5. 
  4. ^ Sumner, Darren (December 8, 2009). "Firesky announces Stargate Resistance video game". GateWorld. Retrieved 2009-12-08. 

External links[edit]