German Spitz

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

German Spitz
Goldilocks.gif
A cream-coloured German Standard Spitz (Mittelspitz)
Other namesGerman: Deutscher Spitz
OriginGermany
Kennel club standards
VDH standard
FCI standard
Dog (domestic dog)
Wolfsspitz
Keeshond tightens the leash.jpg
Other namesKeeshond
Traits
Height 43–55 cm (17–22 in)
Weight 25–30 kg (55–66 lb)
Coat Double coat, long strait outer and thick cotton-wool like undercoat
Colour Grey-shaded
Dog (domestic dog)
German Giant Spitz
Un chien Spitz allemand.jpg
Other namesGerman: Großspitz
Traits
Height 40–50 cm (16–20 in)
Weight 17–18 kg (37–40 lb)
Coat Double coat, long strait outer and thick cotton-wool like undercoat
Colour White, black and brown, sometimes with white spots on the chest, paws and tip of tail
Dog (domestic dog)
German Medium Spitz
Mittelspitz-300px.jpg
Other namesGerman: Mittelspitz
Traits
Height 30–40 cm (12–16 in)
Weight 10.5–11.5 kg (23–25 lb)
Coat Double coat, long strait outer and thick cotton-wool like undercoat
Colour White, black, brown, orange, grey-shaded and other colours
Dog (domestic dog)
German Miniature Spitz
817904a.jpg
Other namesGerman: Kleinspitz
Traits
Height 24–30 cm (9.4–11.8 in)
Weight 8–10 kg (18–22 lb)
Coat Double coat, long strait outer and thick cotton-wool like undercoat
Colour White, black, brown, orange, grey-shaded and other colours
Dog (domestic dog)
Pomeranian
Pomeranian orange-sable Coco.jpg
Other namesGerman: Zwergspitz
German Toy Spitz
Traits
Height 18–24 cm (7.1–9.4 in)
Weight 1.4–3 kg (3.1–6.6 lb)
Coat Double coat, long strait outer and thick cotton-wool like undercoat
Colour White, black, brown, orange, grey-shaded and other colours
Dog (domestic dog)

The German Spitz (German: Deutscher Spitz) is a breed of spitz-type dogs from Germany. Considered a single breed, it comes in five distinct varieties based on size and colour: the Wolfsspitz or Keeshond, the Giant Spitz or Großspitz, the Medium Spitz or Mittelspitz, the Miniature Spitz or Kleinspitz and the Pomeranian or Zwergspitz ("Dwarf Spitz").

Description[edit]

The German Spitz is a long-haired, double-coated breed of spitz-type dogs, the five varieties vary significantly in size. The breed standard states all variants have a double coat with a long, straight and outer coat and a short, thick, cotton-wool like undercoat.[1][2]

Wolfsspitz[edit]

The Wolfsspitz (or Keeshond) is a medium sized dog, it usually weighs 25 to 30 kilograms (55 to 66 lb) and the breed standard states it stands 43 to 55 centimetres (17 to 22 in); its coat is grey coloured.[1][2]

Giant Spitz[edit]

The Giant Spitz is a medium sized dog, it usually weighs 17 to 18 kilograms (37 to 40 lb) and the breed standard state it stands 43 to 55 centimetres (17 to 22 in); its coat can be white, black or brown, black and brown animals can have white spots on the chest, paws and tip of tail.[2][3]

Medium Spitz[edit]

The Medium Spitz is a medium sized dog, it usually weighs 10.5 to 11.5 kilograms (23 to 25 lb) and the breed standard state it stands 30 to 40 centimetres (12 to 16 in); its coat can be white, black, brown, orange, grey-shaded and other colours.[1][2]

Miniature Spitz[edit]

The Miniature Spitz is a small sized dog, it usually weighs 8 to 10 kilograms (18 to 22 lb) and the breed standard state it stands 24 to 30 centimetres (9.4 to 11.8 in); its coat can be white, black, brown, orange, grey-shaded and other colours.[1][2]

Pomeranian[edit]

The Pomeranian (or Zwergspitz, "Dwarf Spitz") is a small sized dog, it usually weighs 1.4 to 3 kilograms (3.1 to 6.6 lb) and the breed standard state it stands 18 to 24 centimetres (7.1 to 9.4 in); its coat can be white, black, brown, orange, grey-shaded and other colours.[1][2]

History[edit]

The German Spitz breed is believed to be descended from Nordic spitz-type herding dogs that were the common ancestor to other breeds such as the Samoyed, the Finnish and the Swedish Lapphund.[4] It is believed these Nordic dogs spread throughout Northern Europe and as far as Britain during the Middle Ages with the Vikings, the earliest mentions of spitz dogs in German literature date from 1450 AD.[1][3][4][5] In 1750, Count Eberhand zu Sayre Buffon wrote in his National history of quadrupeds that spitz dogs were the ancestor of all German breeds.[4]

German Spitz dogs were originally kept on farms for a number of roles including herding and guarding, as the centuries progressed some lines were bred to be smaller for other duties and eventually as small companion dogs.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Fogle, Bruce (2009). The encyclopedia of the dog. New York: DK Publishing. pp. 124 & 134-135. ISBN 978-0-7566-6004-8.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "FCI-Standard No 97: Deutsche Spitze" (PDF). Fédération Cynologique Internationale. 12 November 2019. Retrieved 12 November 2020.
  3. ^ a b c Morris, Desmond (2001). Dogs: the ultimate dictionary of over 1,000 dog breeds. North Pomfret, VT: Trafalgar Square Publishing. pp. 428–439, 521-523 & 525-526. ISBN 1-57076-219-8.
  4. ^ a b c d Wilcox, Bonnie; Walkowicz, Chris (1995). Atlas of dog breeds of the world. Neptune City, N.J.: TFH Publications. pp. 436–438.
  5. ^ Alderton, David (2008). The encyclopedia of dogs. Bath: Parragon Books Ltd. pp. 116, 130 & 345. ISBN 978-1-4454-0853-8.

External links[edit]