German Type UC III submarine

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SM UC 93 Italy.jpg
UC-93 in Italy, 1918
Class overview
Builders:
Operators:  Kaiserliche Marine
Preceded by: UC II
Cost: 3,303,000 German paper marks
Built: 1917–1918
In commission: 1918–1919
Building: 59
Planned: 113
Completed: 25
Cancelled: 54
Lost: 1
General characteristics
Class and type: German Type UC III submarine
Displacement:
  • 491 t (483 long tons), surfaced
  • 571 t (562 long tons), submerged
Length:
Beam: 5.54 m (18 ft 2 in) (o/a)
Draft: 3.77 m (12 ft 4 in)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 11.5 knots (21.3 km/h; 13.2 mph), surfaced
  • 6.6 knots (12.2 km/h; 7.6 mph), submerged
Range:
  • 9,850 nautical miles (18,240 km; 11,340 mi) at 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph), surfaced
  • 40 nmi (74 km; 46 mi) at 4.5 knots (8.3 km/h; 5.2 mph), submerged
Test depth: 75 m (246 ft)
Complement: 32
Armament:
  • 6 × 100 cm (39.4 in) mine tubes
  • 14 × UC 200 mines
  • 3 × 50 cm (19.7 in) torpedo tubes (2 bow external; one stern)
  • 7 × torpedoes
  • 1 × 10.5 cm (4.1 in) SK L/45 deck gun
Notes: 15-second diving time

Type UC III minelaying submarines were used by the Imperial German Navy (Kaiserliche Marine) during World War I. They displaced 474 tonnes (467 long tons) at the surface and 571 t (562 long tons) submerged, carried guns, 7 torpedoes and up to 14 mines. The ships were double-hulled with improved range and sea-keeping compared to the UC II type. The type had better seagoing, manoeuvring and turning capabilities than its predecessor, while underwater stability was reduced.[1]

A total of 113 Type UC III submarines were ordered by the Imperial German Navy, but only 25 U-boats were completed before the Armistice with Germany in 1918. Of those, 16 U-boats actually served in the war. 54 building orders were cancelled in 1918, while 34 U-boats were never completed and broken up in the ship yards.

Design[edit]

German Type UC III submarines had a displacement of 491 tonnes (483 long tons) when at the surface and 571 tonnes (562 long tons) while submerged. They had a length overall of 56.51 m (185 ft 5 in), a beam of 5.54 m (18 ft 2 in), and a draught of 3.77 m (12 ft 4 in). The submarines were powered by two six-cylinder four-stroke diesel engines each producing 300 metric horsepower (220 kW; 300 shp) (a total of 600 metric horsepower (440 kW; 590 shp)), two electric motors producing 770 metric horsepower (570 kW; 760 shp), and two propeller shafts. They had a dive time of 15 seconds and was capable of operating at a depth of 75 metres (246 ft).[2]

The submarines were designed for a maximum surface speed of 11.5 knots (21.3 km/h; 13.2 mph) and a submerged speed of 6.6 knots (12.2 km/h; 7.6 mph). When submerged, they could operate for 40 nautical miles (74 km; 46 mi) at 4.5 knots (8.3 km/h; 5.2 mph); when surfaced, they could travel 9,850 nautical miles (18,240 km; 11,340 mi) at 7 knots (13 km/h; 8.1 mph). UC III-class boats were fitted with six 100 centimetres (39 in) mine tubes, fourteen UC 200 mines, three 50 centimetres (20 in) torpedo tubes (one on the stern and two on the bow), seven torpedoes, and one 8.8 centimetres (3.5 in) Uk L/30 deck gun. Their complement was twenty-six crew members.[2]

List of Type UC III submarines[edit]

Serving in World War I[edit]

There were 16 Type UC III submarines serving with the Imperial German Navy during World War I.

Completed after Armistice and surrendered to the Allies[edit]

Broken up at yard[edit]

See also[edit]


References[edit]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Gröner 1991, p. 35.
  2. ^ a b Gröner 1991, pp. 34-35.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4.