German conjugation

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

German verbs are conjugated depending on their use: as in English, they are modified depending on the persons (identity) and number of the subject of a sentence, as well as depending on the tense and mood.

German verbs start with an infinitive form: the bare form of the verb, which ends with -en. To conjugate regular verbs, this is removed and replaced with alternative endings:

  • To do; machen
    • I do; Ich mache
    • He does; Er macht
    • I did; Ich machte
    • He did; Er machte

In general, irregular forms of German verbs exist to make for easier and clearer pronunciation, with a vowel sound in the centre of the word the only part of the word that changes in an unexpected way (though endings may also be slightly different). This modification is often a moving of the vowel sound to one pronounced further forward in the mouth. This process is called the Germanic umlaut. However, a number of verbs including sein (to be) are fully irregular, as in English I am and I was sound completely different.

  • To know; wissen
    • I know; Ich weiss (vowel change; -e missing)
    • I knew; Ich wusste (vowel change; otherwise regular)
  • To sing; singen
    • I sing; Ich singe (regular)
    • I sang; Ich sang (vowel change; -te missing)

For many German tenses, the verb itself is locked in a non-varying form of the infinitive or past participle (which normally starts with ge-) that is the same regardless of the subject, and then joined to an auxiliary verb that is conjugated. This is similar to English grammar, though the primary verb is normally placed at the end of the clause. Note that in both the examples shown below the auxiliary verb is irregular.

  • I buy the book; Ich kaufe das Buch.
  • I will buy the book; Ich werde das Buch kaufen.
    • She will buy the book; Sie wird das Buch kaufen.
  • I have bought the book; Ich habe das Buch gekauft.
    • She has bought the book; Sie hat das Buch gekauft.

The following tenses and modi are formed by direct conjugation of the verb:

Below is a paradigm of German verbs, that is, a set of conjugation tables, for the model regular verbs and for some of the most common irregular verbs, including the irregular auxiliary verbs.

German tenses and moods[edit]

German verbs have forms for a range of subjects, indicating number and social status:

  • First person singular: 'I'; Ich
  • Second person familiar: 'You' (as used to a friend); Du
  • Third person: 'He', 'She', 'It'; (Er, Sie, Es) with the same form for all three
  • First person plural: 'We'; Wir
  • Second person plural: Ihr
  • Second person polite: 'You'; Sie (which is always capitalised)
  • Third person plural: 'They'; Sie (not automatically capitalised)

The subject does not have to be one of these pronouns, but can instead be anything that has the same person and number. For example, in the sentences Der Ball ist rund ('the ball is round') and Es ist rund ('it is round') the verb is in the same form: third person singular.

In German, the first and third person plural and second person plural/polite forms are identical for each tense. Sie in the second person is used to address one or more people of high status.

As a summary of German tenses, moods and aspects:

  • The German present tense matches both the English present (I walk to work every day) and also the present progressive (I am walking to work right now), to which standard German has no direct equivalent. (See below for a colloquial alternative.) It is formed similarly to the English present tense, by directly conjugating the relevant verb to match the subject.
  • The perfect (I have gone to work; also sometimes called the present perfect) is mostly formed, again as in English, from the appropriate present tense form of 'to have' (haben) and a past participle of the relevant verb placed at the end of the clause. Some intransitive verbs involving motion or change take 'to be' (sein) instead of haben; this may depend on the exact meaning of the sentence. Note that both haben and sein are used in the present tense, and are irregular verbs.
    • 'He has read the book': Er hat das Buch gelesen. (Literally, He has the book read.)
    • 'He has gone into the cinema': Er ist ins Kino gegangen (but literally, He is into the cinema gone.)
  • The imperfect (I closed the door; usually avoided when speaking) is formed from the verb, as in English. The verb may be regular or irregular.
  • The pluperfect (I had read the book, when...) is formed in the same way as in English: identically to the perfect, except with an imperfect form of haben or sein instead of a present tense form.
    • He had read the book; Er hatte das Buch gelesen.
    • He had gone into the cinema; Er war ins Kino gegangen.
  • The future tense (I will read the book or I'm going to read the book) is formed from the appropriate present tense form of the verb werden (to become) and, as in English, the infinitive of the relevant verb.
    • I will read the book: Ich werde das Buch lesen.
    • A classic but easily avoided mistake made by English-speakers learning German is to use "Ich will"-which actually means I want to.
  • The imperative (Be quiet!, Open the door!) is formed by direct conjugation of the verb and varies by number and status of the people addressed, unlike English which always uses an infinitive.
    • Be quiet: Sei ruhig! (when speaking to one person); but Seien Sie ruhig! when speaking to an authority figure. Sei and Seien are both formed from sein (be).
  • The conditional (I would do it) can be formed from würden (would) and the infinitive of the relevant verb, placed at the end of the clause.
    • I would love her; Ich würde sie lieben.
  • Additional forms of the conditional (known as Konjunktiv I & II, for the present and imperfect) also exist. They are equivalent to English forms such as If I were rich or If I loved him, (but also It would be great) and exist for every verb in the present and imperfect tense. They are often avoided for uncommon verbs. For the future tense conditional, the conditional form of werden is used with an infinitive.
    • If I were rich; Wenn ich reich wäre, ...
    • If I had more money; Wenn ich mehr Geld hätte, ...
    • It would be fantastic; Es wäre fantastisch
  • The passive (It is done) may be formed for any tense. It is formed from the past participle and the appropriate form of the verb werden (to become).[1]
    • The lawn is being mowed; Der Rasen wird gemäht (Literally, "The lawn becomes/is becoming mowed.")
    • The lawn was mowed; Der Rasen wurde gemäht. (Literally, "The lawn became/was becoming mowed.")
    • The lawn has been mowed; Der Rasen ist gemäht geworden.
    • The lawn will be mowed; Der Rasen wird gemäht werden. (This uses the verb werden twice in one sentence, but is still quite correct.)
    • The lawn would be mowed; Der Rasen würde gemäht werden.
  • Many German verbs can be converted into the names of jobs, adjectives and verbal nouns describing processes (as English to clean becomes the cleaner, the man cleaning the window and the cleaning process). These generally follow regular patterns, with endings such as -en and -ung. Colloquial German, in particular in the Rhineland and Ruhr areas, uses these verbal nouns with sein to create a kind of present progressive known as the rheinische Verlaufsform:
    • I'm working; "Ich bin am Arbeiten."
    • Note that Arbeiten is not a verb as in the English equivalent but a noun, and is therefore capitalised. A literal translation would be: "I'm at the working."
  • A colloquial method to express future actions is to use present tense with an adjective like tomorrow showing that the event will happen in the future:
    • Tomorrow, I am going to buy groceries.; Morgen kaufe ich Lebensmittel. (Literally, Tomorrow, I buy groceries.)

Regular -en verbs (Weak verbs) (lieben, to love)[edit]

The following tables include only the active simple tenses: those formed by direct conjugation from the verb.

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens lieben
Infinitiv Futur I lieben werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Lieben (gen. des Liebens)
Partizip I Praesens liebend (liebender, liebende, liebendes, liebende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) geliebt (geliebter, geliebte, geliebtes, geliebte)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens liebe liebst liebt lieben liebt lieben
Präteritum liebte liebtest liebte liebten liebtet liebten
Futur I werde lieben wirst lieben wird lieben werden lieben werdet lieben werden lieben
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde lieben würdest lieben würde lieben würden lieben würdet lieben würden lieben
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I liebe liebest liebe lieben liebet lieben
Konjunktiv II liebte liebtest liebte liebten liebtet liebten
Futur I werde lieben werdest lieben werde lieben werden lieben werdet lieben werden lieben
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    lieb(e)   lieben liebt lieben

The ending -e in the imperative singular is almost obligatorily lost in colloquial usage. In the standard language it may be lost or not: lieb! or liebe!, sag! or sage!

The ending -e in the 1st person singular of the present is always kept in normal written style (ich liebe, ich sage), but may also be lost in colloquial usage (ich lieb, ich sag). This occurs more often than not in the middle of a sentence, somewhat less frequently if the verb comes to stand in the end of a sentence.

Regular -n verbs (Weak verbs) (handeln, to act)[edit]

When a verb stem ends in -el or -er, the ending -en is dropped in favor of -n.

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens handeln
Infinitiv Futur I handeln werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Handeln (gen. des Handelns)
Partizip I Praesens handelnd (handelnder, handelnde, handelndes, handelnde)
Partizip II (Perfekt) gehandelt (gehandelter, gehandelte, gehandeltes, gehandelte)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens handle/handele handelst handelt handeln handelt handeln
Präteritum handelte handeltest handelte handelten handeltet handelten
Futur I werde handeln wirst handeln wird handeln werden handeln werdet handeln werden handeln
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde handeln würdest handeln würde handeln würden handeln würdet handeln würden handeln
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I handle handlest handle handlen handlet handlen
Konjunktiv II handelte handeltest handelte handelten handeltet handelten
Futur I werde handeln werdest handeln werde handeln werden handeln werdet handeln werden handeln
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    handle   handeln handelt handeln

Regular -ten verbs (Weak verbs) (arbeiten, to work)[edit]

When a verb stem ends in -t, an intermediate -e- is added before most endings to prevent a large consonant cluster.

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens arbeiten
Infinitiv Futur I arbeiten werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Arbeiten (gen. des Arbeitens)
Partizip I Praesens arbeitend (arbeitender, arbeitende, arbeitendes, arbeitende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) gearbeitet (gearbeiteter, gearbeitetet, gearbeitetes, gearbeitete)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens arbeite arbeitest arbeitet arbeiten arbeitet arbeiten
Präteritum arbeitete arbeitetest arbeitete arbeiteten arbeitetet arbeiteten
Futur I werde arbeiten wirst arbeiten wird arbeiten werden arbeiten werdet arbeiten werden arbeiten
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde arbeiten würdest arbeiten würde arbeiten würden arbeiten würdet arbeiten würden arbeiten
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I arbeite arbeitest arbeite arbeiten arbeitet arbeiten
Konjunktiv II arbeitete arbeitetest arbeitete arbeiteten arbeitetet arbeiteten
Futur I werde arbeiten werdest arbeiten werde arbeiten werden arbeiten werdet arbeiten werden arbeiten
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    arbeite   arbeiten arbeitet arbeiten

Irregular –en verbs (Strong verbs) (fahren, to drive)[edit]

Certain verbs change their stem vowel for the second and third person singular forms. These usually follow one of three patterns:

  • e → ie
  • e → i
  • a → ä
Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens fahren
Infinitiv Futur I fahren werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Fahren (gen. des Fahrens)
Partizip I Praesens fahrend (fahrender, fahrende, fahrendes, fahrende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) gefahren (gefahrener, gefahrene, gefahrenes, gefahrene)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens fahre fährst fährt fahren fahrt fahren
Präteritum fuhr fuhrst fuhr fuhren fuhrt fuhren
Futur I werde fahren wirst fahren wird fahren werden fahren werdet fahren werden fahren
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde fahren würdest fahren würde fahren würden fahren würdet fahren würden fahren
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I fahre fahrest fahre fahren fahret fahren
Konjunktiv II führe führest führe führen führet führen
Futur I werde fahren werdest fahren werde fahren werden fahren werdet fahren werden fahren
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    fahr(e)   fahren fahrt fahren

Irregular –en verbs (Strong verbs) (geben, to give)[edit]

Certain verbs change their stem vowels for the preterite indicative and subjunctive. These changes are unique for each verb.

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens geben
Infinitiv Futur I geben werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Geben (gen. des Gebens)
Partizip I Praesens gebend (gebender, gebende, gebendes, gebende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) gegeben (gegebener, gegebene, gegebenes, gegangene)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens gebe gibst gibt geben gebt geben
Präteritum gab gabst gab gaben gabt gaben
Futur I werde geben wirst geben wird geben werden geben werdet geben werden geben
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde geben würdest geben würde geben würden geben würdet geben würden geben
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I gebe gebest gebe geben gebet geben
Konjunktiv II gäbe gäbest gäbe gäben gäbet gäben
Futur I werde geben werdest geben werde geben werden geben werdet geben werden geben
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    gib   geben gebt geben

Irregular verbs (gehen, to go, to walk)[edit]

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens gehen
Infinitiv Futur I gehen werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Gehen (gen. des Gehens)
Partizip I Praesens gehend (gehender, gehende, gehendes, gehende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) gegangen (gegangener, gegangene, gegangenes, gegangene)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens gehe gehst geht gehen geht gehen
Präteritum ging gingst ging gingen gingt gingen
Futur I werde gehen wirst gehen wird gehen werden gehen werdet gehen werden gehen
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde gehen würdest gehen würde gehen würden gehen würdet gehen würden gehen
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I gehe gehest gehe gehen gehet gehen
Konjunktiv II ginge gingest ginge' gingen ginget gingen
Futur I werde gehen werdest gehen werde gehen werden gehen werdet gehen werden gehen
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    geh(e)   gehen geht gehen

Modal verbs (dürfen, may)[edit]

In modal verbs, the stem vowel will change for all conjugations of the singular simple present. These changes are unique to each verb. In addition, the ending will be missing for the first and third person conjugations of the singular simple present.

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens dürfen
Infinitiv Futur I dürfen werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Dürfen (gen. des Dürfens)
Partizip I Praesens dürfend (dürfender, dürfende, dürfendes, dürfende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) gedurft (gedurfter, gedurfte, gedurftes, gedurfte)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens darf darfst darf dürfen dürft dürfen
Präteritum durfte durftest durfte durften durftet durften
Futur I werde dürfen wirst dürfen wird dürfen werden dürfen werdet dürfen werden dürfen
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde dürfen würdest dürfen würde dürfen würden dürfen würdet dürfen würden dürfen
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I dürfe dürfest dürfe dürfen dürfet dürfen
Konjunktiv II dürfte dürftest dürfte dürften dürftet dürften
Futur I werde dürfen werdest dürfen werde dürfen werden dürfen werdet dürfen werden dürfen
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    dürfe   dürfen dürft dürfen

werden (to become, shall, will, to form Passiv I and the Future)[edit]

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens werden
Infinitiv Futur I werden werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Werden (gen. des Werdens)
Partizip I Praesens werdend (werdender, werdende, werdendes, werdende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) geworden (gewordener, gewordene, geworndenes, gewordene) (to become) / worden (auxiliary)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens werde wirst wird werden werdet werden
Präteritum wurde (arch. ward) wurdest (arch. wardst) wurde (arch. ward) wurden wurdet wurden
Futur I werde werden wirst werden wird werden werden werden werdet werden werden werden
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde werden würdest werden würde werden würden werden würdet werden würden werden
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I werde werdest werde werden werdet werden
Konjunktiv II würde würdest würde würden würdet würden
Futur I werde werden werdest werden werde werden werden werden werdet werden werden werden
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    werde   werden werdet werden

sein (to be, to form Passiv II and the Perfect)[edit]

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens sein
Infinitiv Futur I sein werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Sein (gen. des Seins)
Partizip I Praesens seiend (seiender, seiende, seiendes, seiende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) gewesen (gewesener, gewesene, gewesenes, gewesene)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens bin bist ist sind seid sind
Präteritum war warst war waren wart waren
Futur I werde sein wirst sein wird sein werden sein werdet sein werden sein
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde sein würdest sein würde sein würden sein würdet sein würden sein
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I sei sei(e)st sei seien seiet seien
Konjunktiv II wäre wärest wäre wären wäret wären
Futur I werde sein werdest sein werde sein werden sein werdet sein werden sein
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    sei   seien seid seien

haben (to have, to form the Perfect)[edit]

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens haben
Infinitiv Futur I haben werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Haben (gen. des Habens)
Partizip I Praesens habend (habender, habende, habendes, habende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) gehabt (gehabter, gehabte, gehabtes, gehabte)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens habe hast hat haben habt haben
Präteritum hatte hattest hatte hatten hattet hatten
Futur I werde haben wirst haben wird haben werden haben werdet haben werden haben
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde haben würdest haben würde haben würden haben würdet haben würden haben
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I habe habest habe haben habet haben
Konjunktiv II hätte hättest hätte hätten hättet hätten
Futur I werde haben werdest haben werde haben werden haben werdet haben werden haben
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    hab(e)   haben habt haben

Ihr haben(polite)

tun (to do)[edit]

Non-finite
Infinitiv Präsens tun
Infinitiv Futur I tun werden
substantivierter Infinitiv das Tun (gen. des Tuns)
Partizip I Praesens tuend (tuender, tuende, tuendes, tuende)
Partizip II (Perfekt) getan (getaner, getane, getanes, getane)
Indikativ ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens tue tust tut tun tut tun
Präteritum tat tatest tat taten tatet taten
Futur I werde tun wirst tun wird tun werden tun werdet tun werden tun
Konditional ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Präsens würde tun würdest tun würde tun würden tun würdet tun würden tun
Konjunktiv ich du er wir ihr sie/Sie
Konjunktiv I tue tuest tue tuen tuet tuen
Konjunktiv II täte tätest täte täten tätet täten
Futur I werde tun werdest tun werde tun werden tun werdet tun werden tun
Imperativ   du   wir ihr Sie
    tu(e)   tun tut tun

Separable and Inseparable verbs[edit]

In German, prepositions and modifying prefixes are frequently attached to verbs to alter their meaning. Verbs so formed are divided into separable verbs which detach the prefix in the present tense and inseparable verbs which do not. The conjugations are identical to that of the root verb, and the position of the prefix for both separable and inseparable verbs follows a standard pattern. The prefix's effect on the verb is highly unpredictable, so normally the meaning of each new verb has to be learned separately. (See German verbs for further information on the meanings of common prefixes.)

Separable verbs detach their prefixes in the present, imperfect and imperative. The prefix is placed at the end of the clause. The past participle is the prefix attached to the normal past participle. The infinitive keeps the prefix where it is used, for example in the conditional and future tenses.

  • nehmen - to take (irregular verb)
    • Er nimmt das Buch - He is taking the book. (Vowel change)
    • Er hat das Buch genommen - He has taken the book. (Vowel change and the -en ending common with irregular verbs)
    • Er wird das Buch nehmen - He will take the book. (Future tense)
  • zunehmen - to increase (or put on weight)
    • Es nimmt schnell zu - It is quickly increasing
    • Es hat schnell zugenommen - It has quickly increased
    • Er wird es schnell zunehmen - He will increase it quickly. (Increase is being used in the infinitive as this is the future tense.)

Inseparable verbs retain the prefix at all times. The past participle has the prefix in place of ge- but keeps any irregularities of the root verb's past participle.

  • kaufen - to buy (regular verb)
    • Ich kaufe es - I buy it
    • Ich habe es gekauft - I have bought it
  • verkaufen - to sell
    • Ich verkaufe es - I sell it
    • Ich habe es verkauft - I have sold it (regular apart from ver- replacing ge-)

A number of verbs are separable with one meaning and inseparable with another. For example, übersetzen means to translate as an inseparable verb but to ferry as a separable verb.

External links[edit]

  1. ^ German frequently forms a passive-equivalent construction using 'Man' (anybody; formal English 'one'), followed by the relevant tense.
    • It is possible to; Man kann (lit. One can, more loosely Someone can or Anyone can)
    • Anyone (who wanted to) would have done it: Man würde es gemacht haben.