German ocean-going torpedo boats and destroyers of World War I

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The German large, or ocean-going, torpedo boats and destroyers of World War I were built by the Imperial German Navy between 1899 and 1918 as part of its quest for a “High Seas” or ocean-going fleet. At the start of the First World War Germany had 132 such ships, and ordered a further 216 during the conflict, 112 of which were actually completed. Of these, 55 were lost during the war, 50 were interned on 23 November 1918 under the terms of the Armistice, and subsequently scuttled at Scapa Flow on 21 June 1919. Of the survivors, 32 were included in the post-war Germany navy (some surviving to see service as auxiliaries in the Second World War), 36 were surrendered to Allied powers in 1920, and the remainder were scrapped in 1921.

Designation[edit]

Officially they were called "large torpedo-boats" (Große Torpedoboote) or "ocean-going torpedo-boats" (Hochseetorpedoboote), they were in many ways the equivalent of the contemporary destroyers in other navies (and were often referred to as such by their crews).[1] The Imperial German Navy also had a number of vessels officially designated "destroyers" (Zestorer), but numbered sequentially as torpedo-boats. These were, primarily, vessels under construction for foreign navies and taken over at the outbreak of the First World War.

Background[edit]

The first German Naval Law of 1898 legislated the construction of an ocean-going battle fleet by Imperial Germany. To accompany the squadrons of battleships and cruisers, the law called for the construction of flotillas of considerably larger, better armed and more seaworthy than the previous torpedo boats built by Germany. Although they were initially given numbers in the same series as the smaller torpedo-boats, they were separated in 1911, with the large torpedo boats numbered from SMS V1, and the older vessels re-numbered with a 'T-'prefix. During the next 20 years a total of 336 such vessels were ordered for the German navy; these vessels are listed in this article.

General Remarks[edit]

Programs[edit]

The German Navy's strength during the years prior to the outbreak of the First World War was mandated by a series of acts of the Reichstag, which prescribed the numbers of ships constituting the fleet, as well as age at which these ships should be replaced. The original 1898 Naval Law called for a force 19 Battleships (in two battle squadrons), 8 Armored Coastal Defense Vessels (forming a third battle squadron), 12 large and 30 small cruisers, supported by six flotillas of Ocean-going torpedo boats (two flotillas each for the three battle squadrons). Each flotilla consisted of 12 vessels, or 72 in total. Admiral Tirpitz, the originator of this law, called for these vessels to be large enough to cope with rough seas, but small enough to be commanded by a single officer (due to the man-power constraints of the German Navy at that time).

The 1900 Naval Law, which provided for a major expansion of the German Navy (in reaction to the growing antipathy towards Great Britain provoked by the outbreak of the Boer War) expanded the torpedo-boat force to 144 vessels, half in commission, half in reserve with 60% nucleus crews. From 1898 until 1905, torpedo boats were ordered at a rate of 6 per year.

The total number of torpedo boats remained the same under the 1906 Law, although the number in commission increased to 99, with 45 in material reserve. Older vessels were to be replaced after 12 years of service, so that the annual rate of construction increased to 12 vessels in 1906 and subsequent years.

Following the outbreak of war in August 1914, 48 new vessels of the latest design were quickly ordered. This was augmented in the following weeks by seizures of vessels and machinery under manufacture in Germany for foreign powers, resulting in the addition of 4 small and 12 extra-large torpedo boats (the later group officially being designated destroyers). More orders were placed in 1916 and later years, although the deteriorating war situation of Germany meant that only a portion of these vessels were ever completed.

Designations and Builders[edit]

As was common with other naval powers, the Germany Admiralty gave broad specifications for the vessels they ordered but allowed shipbuilders considerable latitude in the detail designs, with the result that there were various minor differences between vessels, even between vessels ordered in the same year. German torpedo-boats were not given names, but were numbered in a sequential series[a], with an initial letter to denote the builder:

Letter Builder Number of vessels [b]
B Blohm & Voss, Hamburg
9
G Germaniawerft, Kiel
58
H Howaldtswerke, Kiel
24
S Schichau-Werke, Elbing
135
V AG Vulcan, Stettin and Hamburg [c]
109
Ww Wilhelmshaven Imperial Shipyard
1[d].

Comparison with Foreign Vessels[edit]

Germany's main naval adversary of this period was Great Britain. Generally speaking, German large torpedo-boats tended to be slightly smaller than contemporary British destroyers, with lighter gun armament but heavier torpedo armament. Germany favored a well-deck forward of the bridge, mounting torpedo tubes, with a short fo'c'sle mounting a single gun; the freeboard was kept small in order to reduce the silhouette (so that the vessel would be more difficult for an adversary to spot); these features made fighting in rough weather difficult, and in later designs the well-deck was deleted and the fo'c'sle extended. Germany was slower than Britain in adopting new propulsion technologies such as steam turbines, oil fuel and geared turbines[e].

Type 1898[edit]

1898 Program

  • length: 62.7 m (205 ft 8 in) water-line, 63.0 m (206 ft 8 in) over-all; beam: 7.0 m (23 ft); draft: 2.83 m (9 ft 3 inches) deep load
  • Displacement: 310 tons normal, 394 tons full
  • Machinery: triple expansion engines driving two propellers, 5900 HP (4.4 MW); speed: 27 knots (50 km/h); 93 tons coal; Range : 830 nautical miles at 17 knots
  • Crew: 57 men
  • Weapons: 5 cm SK L/40 (2") guns in single mountings; three 45 cm (18") torpedo tubes, single center-line mountings (one in well-deck forward of the bridge, two others amidships).
Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S90 26 Jul 1899 24 Oct 1899 based in the German colony of Tsingtao in 1914; On 17 Oct 1914 during the Siege of Tsingtao, she sortied and sank the cruiser IJNS Takachiho, but, unable to escape the Allied blockade after running aground, she was scuttled, c. 35 nautical miles south-west of Tsingtao (35°32′N 119°36′E / 35.533°N 119.600°E / 35.533; 119.600 (SMS S90)).
S91 25 Sep 1899 24 Apr 1900 served overseas 1900-02; renamed T 91 (4 Sep 1914); served as a coastal defense vessel, and then as a tender (from 1915); stricken from list, 22 Mar 1921; sold 26 May 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf.
S92 15 May 1900 27 Jun 1900 served overseas 1900-02; renamed T 92 (4 Sep 1914); mine-sweeping and escort vessel, 1914–18; stricken from list, 22 Mar 1921; sold 26 May 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf.
S93 24 Mar 1900 14 Jul 1900 renamed T 93 (4 Sep 1914); coastal defense and escort vessel, 1914–18 ; stricken from list, 22 Mar 1921; sold 26 May 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf.
S94 23 Apr 1900 27 Jul 1900 renamed T 94 (4 Sep 1914); coastal defense and tender, 1914–18 ; sunk, 13 Mar 1920 at Wilhelmshaven during the Kapp Putsch; raised, stricken 26 Oct 1920; sold 13 May 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven .
S95 20 Feb 1900 29 Aug 1900 renamed T 95 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.

1899 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S96 31 Jan 1900 27 Sep 1900 renamed T 96 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf, 1921.
S97 16 Dec 1899 28 May 1900 on completion she served as the disarmed dispatch vessel Sleipner for service with Royal yacht; following the outbreak of war, she was re-armed and renamed T 97 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf, 1921.
S98 28 Jul 1900 4 Nov 1900 renamed T 98 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf, 1921.
S99 4 Sep 1900 13 Dec 1900 renamed T 99 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf, 1921.
S100 13 Nov 1900 18 Apr 1901 renamed T 100 (4 Sep 1914); training vessel; sunk 15 Oct 1915 in collision with ferry Preußen c. 5 miles south-east of Sassnitz, Baltic Sea (54°30′N 13°43′E / 54.500°N 13.717°E / 54.500; 13.717 (SMS S100)) (39 killed); wreck was blown up and raised, 1925-26.
S101 22 Dec 1900 30 Apr 1901 renamed T 101 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.

1900 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S102 18 Apr 1901 18 Jul 1901 renamed T 102 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
S103 15 May 1901 17 Sep 1901 renamed T 103 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf, 1921.
S104 22 Jun 1901 7 Oct 1901 renamed T 104 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf, 1921.
S105 7 Aug 1901 17 Nov 1901 renamed T 105 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf, 1921.
S106 7 Sep 1901 9 Dec 1901 renamed T 106 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Düsseldorf, 1921.
S107 17 Oct 1901 27 Jan 1902 renamed T 107 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.

1901 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
G108 7 Sep 1901 26 Mar 1902 renamed T 108 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Hamburg, 1921.
G109 9 Nov 1901 19 Jun 1902 renamed T 109 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
G110 9 Sep 1902 21 Jan 1903 renamed T 110 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Hamburg.
G111 2 Apr 1902 21 Jul 1902 renamed T 111 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1920 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
G112 19 Jun 1902 6 Sep 1902 renamed T 111 (4 Sep 1914); Sold 22 Mar 1920 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
G113 9 Aug 1902 16 Oct 1902 renamed T 113 (4 Sep 1914); sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.

1902 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S114 9 Aug 1902 25 Oct 1902 renamed T 114 (27 Sep 1916); Sold 9 Nov 1920 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
S115 10 Sep 1902 22 Feb 1903 Sunk 17 Oct 1914 in action c. 50 miles SW of Texel Island, North Sea (52°48′N 3°49′E / 52.800°N 3.817°E / 52.800; 3.817 (SMS S115)) by light cruiser HMS Undaunted and the destroyers HMS Lennox, HMS Lance, HMS Loyal and HMS Legion (55 killed).
S116 14 Oct 1902 28 Mar 1903 Torpedoed and sunk, 6 Oct 1914, c. 10 miles north of Schiermonnikoog, North Sea (53°42′N 6°9′E / 53.700°N 6.150°E / 53.700; 6.150 (SMS S116)) by the British submarine E 9 (9 killed).
S117 4 Feb 1903 21 May 1903 Sunk 17 Oct 1914 with S115, in 52°48′N 3°53′E / 52.800°N 3.883°E / 52.800; 3.883 (SMS S117) (64 killed).
S118 21 Mar 1903 9 Jul 1903 Sunk 17 Oct 1914 with S 115, in 52°50′N 3°49′E / 52.833°N 3.817°E / 52.833; 3.817 (SMS S118) (52 killed).
S119 8 Jul 1903 6 Sep 1903 Sunk 17 Oct 1914 with S115, in 52°50′N 3°53′E / 52.833°N 3.883°E / 52.833; 3.883 (SMS S119) (47 killed); code books subsequently recovered by Royal Navy Intelligence.

1903 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S120 10 Feb 1904 7 May 1904 renamed T 120 (27 Sep 1916); sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.
S121 3 Mar 1904 17 Jun 1904 renamed T 121 (27 Sep 1916); Sold 22 Mar 1920 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
S122 23 Apr 1904 5 Aug 1904 mined and sunk 5 Oct 1918 c. 50 miles north of Ameland, North Sea (54°40′N 5°57′E / 54.667°N 5.950°E / 54.667; 5.950 (SMS S122)) (12 killed).
S123 25 Jun 1904 23 Aug 1904 mined and sunk 1 May 1916 northern end of Sylt Island, North Sea (55°4′N 8°23′E / 55.067°N 8.383°E / 55.067; 8.383 (SMS S123)) (23 killed).
S124 3 Aug 1904 8 Oct 1904 sunk 30 Nov 1914 in collision with Danish S.S. Anglodane, c. 12 miles north of Rostock, Baltic (54°22′N 12°11′E / 54.367°N 12.183°E / 54.367; 12.183 (SMS S124)) (1 killed); wreck raised and scrapped, Kiel, 1915.
S125 19 May 1904 4 Apr 1905 renamed T 125 (27 Sep 1916); sold 26 Oct 1920 and scrapped, Hamburg-Moorburg.

1904 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S126 26 Nov 1904 30 Apr 1905 sunk in collision with SMS Undine, 17 Nov 1905 (33 killed); raised 1906 and returned to service, 1908; renamed T 126 (27 Sep 1916); Sold 22 Mar 1920 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
S127 12 Jan 1905 7 Jun 1905 renamed T 120 (27 Sep 1916); sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.
S128 25 Feb 1905 8 Jul 1905 renamed T 128 (27 Sep 1916); Sold 22 Mar 1920 and scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
S129 4 Mar 1905 10 Aug 1905 wrecked 5 Nov 1915 c. 3 miles north-west of Nigehörn Island, North Sea (53°59′N 8°21′E / 53.983°N 8.350°E / 53.983; 8.350 (SMS S123)) (0 killed).
S130 27 Apr 1905 17 Sep 1905 renamed T 130 (27 Sep 1916); sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.
S131 25 May 1905 6 Oct 1905 renamed T 131 (27 Sep 1916); sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.

1905 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
G132 12 May 1906 22 Aug 1906 renamed T 132 (27 Sep 1916); sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.
G133 30 Jun 1906 10 Dec 1906 renamed T 133 (27 Sep 1916); sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.
G134 23 Jul 1906 6 Mar 1907 renamed T 134 (27 Sep 1916); sold 9 Nov 1920 and scrapped Hamburg, 1920.
G135 7 Sep 1906 24 Jan 1906 renamed T 135 (27 Sep 1916); sold 25 May 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.
G136 25 Aug 1906 16 Mar 1907 renamed T 136 (27 Sep 1916); sold 21 Jul 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.
G137 24 Jan 1907 24 Jul 1907 renamed T 137 (27 Sep 1916); sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.

Type 1906[edit]

1906 Program (II Flotilla)

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S138 22 Sep 1906 7 May 1907 renamed T 138 (24 Sep 1917); mined and sunk, c. 50 miles north-west of Terschelling, North Sea (54°26′N 4°32′E / 54.433°N 4.533°E / 54.433; 4.533 (SMS S138)), 0106 hrs, 7 Jul 1918 (32 killed).
S139 12 Nov 1906 6 Jul 1907 renamed T 139 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; removed from active service 3 Aug 1927; converted to remote control vessel Pfeil, 1927; still in use, 1944; ultimate fate unknown, presumably scrapped post-1945.
S140 22 Dec 1906 3 Aug 1907 renamed T 140 (24 Sep 1917); sold for scrap, 22 Mar 1921.
S141 7 Feb 1907 9 Sep 1907 renamed T 141 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; removed from active service 3 Aug 1927; converted to target vessel Blitz, 1927; sold for scrap, 1933.
S142 6 Mar 1907 20 Sep 1907 renamed T 142 (24 Sep 1917); training and escort vessel; sold for scrap, 2 Dec 1920.
S143 6 Apr 1907 12 Oct 1907 sunk 1700 hrs 3 Aug 1914 following a boiler explosion, c. 30 miles north of Rostock, Baltic (54°30′N 12°06′E / 54.500°N 12.100°E / 54.500; 12.100 (SMS S143)) (24 killed); raised and repaired; renamed T 143 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; stricken from Navy list, 10 May 1927; sold 25 Mar 30 and scrapped, Hamburg.
S144 27 Apr 1907 3 Dec 1907 renamed T 144 (24 Sep 1917); Tender, 1918; to Reichsmarine, 1919; sold for scrap 8 Oct 1928.
S145 8 Jun 1907 17 Dec 1907 renamed T 145 (24 Sep 1917); sold for scrap 22 Mar 1921.
S146 27 Jun 1907 20 Nov 1907 renamed T 146 (24 Sep 1917); training vessel; to Reichsmarine, 1919; sold for scrap 8 Oct 1928.
S147 3 Aug 1907 10 Apr 1908 renamed T 147 (24 Sep 1917); escort vessel; sold for scrap, 2 Dec 1920.
S148 11 Sep 1907 18 Mar 1908 renamed T 148 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; removed from Navy List 8 Oct 1928; scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1935.
S149 19 Oct 1907 27 Jul 1908 renamed T 149 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; removed from Navy list, 16 May 1927; scrapped.

1907 Program (VI Flotilla)

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
V150 1 Aug 1907 20 Nov 1907 sunk in collision with V 157, 0020 hrs, 18 May 1915 in the Jade in 54°24′N 7°45′E / 54.400°N 7.750°E / 54.400; 7.750 (SMS V150) (60 killed).
V151 14 Sep 1907 29 Feb 1908 renamed T 151 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; target tug Comet, 1937; escort vessel, 1939; Mine clearance service, 1945; transferred to USA, 4 Jan 1946; scrapped, Bremen 1948.
V152 11 Oct 1907 10 Apr 1908 renamed T 152 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; sold 31 Mar 1931; scrapped, 1935.
V153 13 Nov 1907 9 May 1908 renamed T 153 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; training ship Eduard Jungmann, 1938; transferred to USA, 22 Dec 1945; Mine clearance service until 1947; scrapped, 1949.
V154 19 Dec 1907 5 Jun 1908 renamed T 154 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; sold 8 Oct 1928; scrapped, 1935.
V155 28 Jan 1908 25 Jun 1908 renamed T 155 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; tender and escort vessel, 1936; sunk, Swinemünde, 22 Apr 1945 in 53°56′N 14°17′E / 53.933°N 14.283°E / 53.933; 14.283 (SMS V155); later scrapped. .
V156 29 Feb 1908 21 Jul 1908 training vessel; renamed T 156 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; escort vessel, 1936; renamed Bremse, in Norway, 1944; sunk, 3 May 1945, Kiel; later scrapped.
V157 29 May 1908 27 Aug 1908 renamed T 157 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; escort vessel, 1936; mined and sunk, 17.25 hrs, 22 Oct 1943 at Neufahrwasser, Danzig in 54°25′N 18°43′E / 54.417°N 18.717°E / 54.417; 18.717 (SMS V157). raised and scrapped.
V158 23 Jun 1908 8 Oct 1908 renamed T 158 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; escort vessel, 1936; to USSR, as Prozorlivyj, 15 Jan 1946; scrapped. 1950.
V159 18 Jul 1908 2 Nov 1908 renamed T 159 (24 Sep 1917); to UK, 20 Aug 1920; scrapped, Granton, Edinburgh, 1922.
V160 12 Sep 1908 15 Dec 1908 renamed T 160 (24 Sep 1917); to UK, 20 Aug 1920; scrapped, Granton, 1922.
V161 21 Apr 1908 17 Sep 1908 renamed T 161 (24 Sep 1917); to UK, 3 Sep 1920; scrapped Bo'ness, 1922.

1908 Program (III Flotilla)

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
V162 9 May 1909 28 May 1909 coastal defence; mined and sunk, Baltic, 22.30 hrs, 15 Aug 1916 in 57°35′N 21°35′E / 57.583°N 21.583°E / 57.583; 21.583 (SMS V162) (15 killed).
V163 24 May 1909 22 Jul 1909 training vessel; renamed T 163 (24 Sep 1917); to UK, 3 Sep 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1921.
V164 27 May 1909 20 Aug 1909 renamed T 164 (24 Sep 1917); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Bo'ness, 1922.
S165(i) 20 Mar 1909 - sold to Turkey, 1910 as Muavenet-i Milliye; laid up 1918; scrapped, 1953.
S166(i) 24 Apr 1909 - sold to Turkey, 1910 as Yadigar-i Millet; sunk by British bombing attack, Bosporus, 10 Jul 1917 in 39°56′N 29°10′E / 39.933°N 29.167°E / 39.933; 29.167 (Yadigar-i Millet) (29 killed): raised Oct 1917; scrapped 1924.
S167(i) 3 Jul 1909 - sold to Turkey, 1910 as Numune-i Hamiyet, laid up, 1919 ; scrapped, 1923.
S168(i) 30 Sep 1909 - sold to Turkey, 1910 as Gayret-i Vataniye; wrecked, 28 Oct 1916 off Balchik in the Black Sea.
G169 29 Dec 1908 29 Apr 1909 renamed T 169 (24 Sep 1917); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
G170 7 Nov 1909 30 Apr 1909 renamed T 170 (24 Sep 1917); sold 22 Mar 1921 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven, 1921.
G171 28 May 1909 4 Jan 1910 sunk in collision with SMS Zähringen in 54°10′N 8°5′E / 54.167°N 8.083°E / 54.167; 8.083 (SMS G171), 14 Sep 1912 (7 killed); wreck blown up, 1912.
G172 10 Jul 1909 4 Jan 1910 renamed T 172 (24 Sep 1917); mined and sunk 04.28 hrs, 7 Jul 1918, North Sea in 54°26′N 4°35′E / 54.433°N 4.583°E / 54.433; 4.583 (SMS G172) (16 killed).
G173 28 Jul 1909 24 Jan 1910 renamed T 173 (24 Sep 1917); to UK, 3 Sep 1920; scrapped, Montrose, 1922.

1909 Program (VIII Flotilla)

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
G174 8 Jan 1910 6 Jul 1910 renamed T 174 (22 Feb 1918); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Granton, 1922.
G175 24 Feb 1910 4 Dec 1910 temporarily renamed Sleipner for two months in 1912 while serving as a despatch boat; renamed T 175 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; deleted from list and sold (for 63 000 ℛℳ), 23 Sep 1926; scrapped, Hamburg.
S176 12 Apr 1910 23 Sep 1910 renamed T 176 (22 Feb 1918); to UK, 15 Sep 1920; scrapped, Montrose, 1922.
S177 21 May 1910 16 Feb 1911 mined and sunk, Baltic, 09.46 hrs 23 Dec 1915 in 57°30′N 21°27′E / 57.500°N 21.450°E / 57.500; 21.450 (SMS G172) (7 killed).
S178 14 Jul 1910 9 Dec 1910 sunk in collision with SMS Yorck, 4 Mar 1913 (69 killed); wreck raised in two parts and repaired, 1915; renamed T 178 (22 Feb 1918); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
S179 27 Aug 1910 8 Mar 1911 renamed T 179 (22 Feb 1918); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
V180 15 Oct 1909 4 Jan 1910 renamed T 179 (22 Feb 1918); to Brazil, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1921.
V181 6 Nov 1909 11 Mar 1910 renamed T 181 (22 Feb 1918); to Japan, 20 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
V182 1 Dec 1909 4 May 1910 renamed T 182 (22 Feb 1918); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
V183 23 Dec 1909 12 May 1910 renamed T 183 (22 Feb 1918); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
V184 26 Feb 1910 29 Jun 1910 renamed T 184 (22 Feb 1918); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
V185 9 Apr 1910 20 Sep 1910 renamed T 185 (22 Feb 1918); to Reichsmarine, 1919; deleted, 4 Oct 1932; used as target vessel; to USSR as Vystrel, 1945.

1910 Program (I Flotilla)

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
V186 28 Nov 1910 21 Apr 1911 renamed T 186 (22 Feb 1918); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
V187 11 Jan 1911 4 May 1911 sunk by gunfire of British cruisers and destroyers, Battle of Heligoland Bight in 52°8′N 7°31′E / 52.133°N 7.517°E / 52.133; 7.517 (SMS V187), 10.00 hrs 28 Aug 1914 (24 killed).
V188 8 Feb 1911 20 May 1911 Torpedoed and sunk by British submarine E-16, North Sea in 54°16′N 5°35′E / 54.267°N 5.583°E / 54.267; 5.583 (SMS S116), 14.00 hrs 26 Jul 1915 (5 killed).
V189 14 Mar 1911 30 Jun 1911 renamed T 189 (22 Feb 1918); transferred to UK at Cherbourg, 28 Apr 1920; stranded on British south coast, Dec 1920; scrapped, Chatham, 1922.
V190 12 Apr 1911 5 Aug 1911 renamed T 190 (22 Feb 1918); to Reichsmarine, 1919; pilot boat Claus von Bevern, 29 Aug 1938; to USA 1945; scuttled in Skagerrak, 1946.
V191 2 Jun 1911 28 Sep 1911 mined and sunk, 17.45 hrs 17 Dec 1915 in Baltic in 57°30′N 21°34′E / 57.500°N 21.567°E / 57.500; 21.567 (SMS V191) (25 killed).
G192 5 Nov 1910 8 May 1911 renamed T 192 (22 Feb 1918); transferred to UK at Cherbourg 28 Apr 1920; scrapped, Chatham, 1922.
G193 10 Dec 1910 25 Jun 1911 renamed T 193 (22 Feb 1918); transferred to UK at Cherbourg, 28 Apr 1920; scrapped, Chatham, 1922.
G194 12 Jan 1911 2 Aug 1911 rammed and sunk in the North Sea by HMS Cleopatra in 55°33′N 6°5′E / 55.550°N 6.083°E / 55.550; 6.083 (SMS G194), 26 Mar 1916 (93 killed).
G195 8 Apr 1911 8 Sep 1911 renamed T 195 (22 Feb 1918); transferred to UK at Cherbourg, 28 Apr 1920; scrapped, Chatham, 1922.
G196 24 May 1911 2 Oct 1911 renamed T 196 (22 Feb 1918); to Reichsmarine, 1919; training vessel; minesweeper HQ vessel, 1939; to USSR, 27 Dec 1945; renamed Pronzitelnyj in Soviet service; later scrapped. .
G197 23 Jun 1911 10 Nov 1911 renamed T 197 (22 Feb 1918); transferred to UK at Cherbourg, 28 Apr 1920; scrapped, Briton Ferry, 1921.

1910 supplementary order Replacements for the four vessels sold to Turkey in 1910.

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S165(ii) 26 Nov 1910 27 Apr 1911 renamed T 165 (24 Sep 1917); to UK, 15 Sep 1920; scrapped, Montrose, 1922.
S166(ii) 27 Dec 1910 7 Jul 1911 renamed T 166 (24 Sep 1917); to UK, 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
S167(ii) 15 Feb 1911 26 Aug 1911 renamed T 167 (24 Sep 1917); sold, 22 Mar 1921; scrapped Kiel.
S168(ii) 16 Mar 1911 1 Jul 1911 renamed T 168 (24 Sep 1917); to Reichsmarine, 1919; deleted from the fleet list, 1927 and sold, 8 Jan 1927; scrapped, Hamburg.

Type 1911[edit]

1911 Program (V Flotilla) On completion, these vessels formed the V Torpedo Boat Flotilla of the High Seas Fleet.

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
V 1 11 Sep 1911 12 Jan 1912 to Reichsmarine, 1919; stricken from the Fleet list, 27 Mar 1929; scrapped, Wilhelmshaven.
V 2 14 Oct 1911 28 Mar 1912 to Reichsmarine, 1919; stricken from the Fleet list, 18 Nov 1929; scrapped, Wilhelmshaven.
V 3 15 Nov 1911 2 May 1912 to Reichsmarine, 1919; stricken from the Fleet list, 18 Nov 1929; scrapped, Wilhelmshaven.
V 4 23 Dec 1911 15 Jun 1912 sunk 03.20 hrs, 1 Jun 1916 during the Battle of Jutland 55°36′N 6°37′E / 55.600°N 6.617°E / 55.600; 6.617 (SMS V4) (18 killed).
V 5(i) 22 May 1912 - Sold to Greece, Jul 1912 as Keravnos; laid up 1919 and scrapped, 1921.
V 6(i) 29 Feb 1912 - Sold to Greece, Jul 1912 as Nea Genea; laid up 1919 and scrapped, 1921.
G 7 7 Nov 1911 30 Apr 1912 to Reichsmarine, 1919; Training vessel, 1936; re-designated T 107 , 23 Apr 1939 ; to USSR, 1945 as Poražajuščij, later hulked; scrapped, 1957.
G 8 21 Dec 1911 6 Aug 1912 to Reichsmarine, 1919; Training vessel, 1936; re-designated T 108 , 23 Apr 1939; to UK, 6 Jan 1946; scrapped 1946.
G 9 31 Jan 1912 25 Sep 1912 mined and sunk 04.15 hrs 3 May 1918 in 55°14′N 6°19′E / 55.233°N 6.317°E / 55.233; 6.317 (SMS G9) (31 killed).
G 10 15 Mar 1912 28 Aug 1912 to Reichsmarine, 1919; Training vessel, 1936; re-designated T 110 , 23 Apr 1939; sunk, 5 May 1945 in the River Trave, Lübeck.
G 11 23 Apr 1912 8 Aug 1912 to Reichsmarine, 1919; Training vessel, 1936; re-designated T 111 , 23 Apr 1939; bombed and sunk, 3 Apr 1945 in Scheerhafen, Kiel.
G 12 15 Juli 1912 17 Oct 1912 damaged in collision with V 1, 06.00 hrs 8 Sep 1915 in 55°25′N 7°28′E / 55.417°N 7.467°E / 55.417; 7.467 (SMS G12) and sunk following a torpedo explosion (47 killed).

1912 Program (VII Flotilla) On completion, these vessels formed the VII Torpedo Boat Flotilla of the High Seas Fleet.

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S 13 7 Dec 1911 2 Jul 1912 sunk 08.56 hrs 6 Nov 1914 in 54°0′N 8°22′E / 54.000°N 8.367°E / 54.000; 8.367 (SMS S13) following a torpedo explosion (9 killed).
S 14 2 Mar 1912 1 Nov 1912 sunk by internal explosion, 19 Feb 1915 in the Jade in53°40′N 8°5′E / 53.667°N 8.083°E / 53.667; 8.083 (SMS S14) (11 killed); raised, 1915 and scrapped, Wilhelmshaven.
S 15 23 Mar 1912 1 Nov 1912 mined 21 Aug 1917 in the English Channel in 51°15′N 2°55′E / 51.250°N 2.917°E / 51.250; 2.917 (SMS S15); removed from service as beyond repair, 20 Sep 1917 and scrapped, Ghent.
S 16 20 Apr 1912 1 Oct 1912 mined and sunk 18.15 hrs, 20 Jan 1918 in 54°41′N 2°55′E / 54.683°N 2.917°E / 54.683; 2.917 (SMS S16) (80 killed).
S 17 22 Jun 1912 7 Dec 1912 mined and sunk 16 May 1917 in 53°34′N 5°56′E / 53.567°N 5.933°E / 53.567; 5.933 (SMS S17) (25 killed).
S 18 10 Aug 1912 12 Jan 1913 to Reichsmarine, 1919; collided with battleship Hannover off Rugen, 23 May 1922 (10 killed); repaired; stricken from Fleet list, 1929; sold 31 Mar 1931 and scrapped, Kiel, 1935.
S 19 17 Oct 1912 29 Mar 1913 to Reichsmarine, 1919; stricken from Fleet list, 1929; sold 31 Mar 1931; scrapped, Kiel, 1935.
S 20 4 Dec 1912 1 Nov 1913 sunk in action with HMS Centaur, 04.00 hrs 5 Jun 1917 off Flanders Coast in 51°28′N 2°48′E / 51.467°N 2.800°E / 51.467; 2.800 (SMS S20) (49 killed).
S 21 11 Jan 1913 20 Jun 1913 rammed and sunk by SMS Hamburg 21 Apr 1915 in 53°47′N 08°09′E / 53.783°N 8.150°E / 53.783; 8.150 (SMS S21) (36 killed).
S 22 15 Feb 1913 23 Jul 1913 mined and sunk 21.35 hrs 26 Mar 1916 in 53°46′N 5°4′E / 53.767°N 5.067°E / 53.767; 5.067 (SMS S22) (76 killed).
S 23 29 Mar 1913 1 Nov 1913 to Reichsmarine, 1919; renumbered T 123 16 Mar 1932; renamed Komet, 23 Apr 1939; control vessel for radio-controlled target vessel Hessen; the fate since November 1944 is unknown.
S 24 28 Jun 1913 27 Aug 1913 surrendered to the UK at Cherbourg, 28 Apr 1920; stranded on the south coast, 1920; later scrapped.

1912 Supplementary order Replacements for the two vessels sold to Greece in 1912.

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
V 5 (ii) 25 Apr 1913 17 Jul 1913 to Reichsmarine, 1919; deleted from Fleet list, 18 Nov 1929; scrapped, Wilhelmshaven.
V 6 (ii) 28 Feb 1913; 17 May 1913 to Reichsmarine, 1919; deleted from Fleet list, 27 Mar 1929; scrapped, Wilhelmshaven

Type 1913[edit]

1913 Program (IX Flotilla) Ordered 1 Apr 1913. On completion, most of these vessels joined the IX Torpedo Boat Flotilla of the High Seas Fleet.

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
V 25 29 Jan 1914 27 Jun 1914 mined and sunk 04.00 hrs 13 Feb 1915 in 54°22′N 7°47′E / 54.367°N 7.783°E / 54.367; 7.783 (SMS 25) (79 killed).
V 26 21 Feb 1914 1 Aug 1914 surrendered to UK at Cherbourg, 13 Feb 1920; scrapped, Portishead 1922.
V 27 26 Mar 1914 2 Sep 1914 sunk during the Battle of Jutland, 17.40 hrs 31 May 1916 in 56°24.3′N 5°54′E / 56.4050°N 5.900°E / 56.4050; 5.900 (SMS V27) (0 killed).
V 28 9 May 1914 22 Sep 1914 surrendered to UK at Cherbourg, 13 Feb 1920; scrapped, Portishead 1922.
V 29 18 Aug 1914 19 Oct 1914 sunk by torpedo hit from HMS Petard during the Battle of Jutland, 17.45 hrs 31 May 1916 in 56°43′N 5°57′E / 56.717°N 5.950°E / 56.717; 5.950 (SMS V29) (37 killed).
V 30 18 Sep 1914 16 Nov 1914 mined and sunk 20 Nov 1918 in 54°45′N 6°15′E / 54.750°N 6.250°E / 54.750; 6.250 (SMS V30), while en route to the surrender of the High Seas Fleet (2 killed).
S 31 20 Dec 1913 9 Aug 1914 mined and sunk 23.00 hrs 19 Aug 1915 in 57°23′N 23°5′E / 57.383°N 23.083°E / 57.383; 23.083 (SMS S31) during the assault into the Gulf of Riga (11 killed).
S 32 28 Feb 1914 10 Sep 1914 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919; raised 19 Jun 1925 and scrapped, Granton.
S 33 4 Apr 1914 4 Oct 1914 torpedoed and sunk by British submarine L 10 11.43 hrs 3 Oct 1918, North Sea in 54°44′N 5°15′E / 54.733°N 5.250°E / 54.733; 5.250 (SMS S33) (5 killed).
S 34 13 Jun 1914 5 Nov 1914 mined and sunk 03.05 hrs 3 Oct 1918, North Sea in 54°45′N 5°43′E / 54.750°N 5.717°E / 54.750; 5.717 (SMS S34) (70 killed).
S 35 30 Aug 1914 4 Dec 1914 Sold to Greece Apr 1914, but seized 10 Aug 1914; sunk 20.00 hrs 31 May 1916 during the Battle of Jutland in 56°56′N 6°4′E / 56.933°N 6.067°E / 56.933; 6.067 (SMS S35) (87 killed, including 4 survivors of V 29).
S 36 17 Oct 1914 4 Jan 1915 Sold to Greece Apr 1914, but seized 10 Aug 1914; Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919; raised 18 Apr 1925 and scrapped.

1914 Program (VI Flotilla) The last pre-war Flotilla, ordered 22 Apr 1914. On completion, most of these vessels joined the VI Torpedo Boat Flotilla of the High Seas Fleet, (replacing V 151-V 161).

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
G 37 17 Dec 1914 2 Jul 1915 mined and sunk 04.55 hrs 4 Nov 1917 in 54°19′N 4°55′E / 54.317°N 4.917°E / 54.317; 4.917 (SMS G37) (4 killed).
G 38 23 Dec 1914 30 Jul 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
G 39 16 Jan 1915 20 Aug 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
G 40 27 Feb 1915 16 Sep 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
G 41 24 Apr 1915 14 Oct 1915 heavily damaged in collision with V 69 during the action off the North Hinder, 22-23 Jan 1917; laid up in Bruges, and scuttled there on 3 Oct 1918 in 51°13′N 3°14′E / 51.217°N 3.233°E / 51.217; 3.233 (SMS G41), as she was unable to be evacuated.
G 42 20 May 1915 10 Nov 1915 sunk in action with HMS Broke, 2nd Battle of Dover Strait 21 Apr 1917 in 51°9′N 1°37′E / 51.150°N 1.617°E / 51.150; 1.617 (SMS G42) (36 killed).
V 43 27 Jan 1915 28 May 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; attempted scuttling on 21 Jun 1919 failed and ship recovered; to USA, 1920;[2] sunk as air bombing target off Cape Henry, 15 Jul 1921.
V 44 24 Feb 1915 22 Jul 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; attempted scuttling on 21 Jun 1919 failed and ship recovered; to UK, 1920; after use as gunnery target, beached off Whale Island, Portsmouth Harbour 50°48′49″N 1°05′43″W / 50.81361°N 1.09528°W / 50.81361; -1.09528 (SMS V44), and partially scrapped, c. 1922 (remains still visible in Portsmouth harbour at low tide, 2016).[3]
V 45 29 Mar 1915 30 Sep 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
V 46 23 Dec 1914 31 Oct 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; attempted scuttling on 21 Jun 1919 failed and ship recovered; to France, 1920; scrapped Cherbourg, 1924.
V 47 10 Jun 1915 20 Nov 1915 non-seaworthy, unable to evacuate and scuttled 2 Nov 1918, Ghent–Terneuzen Canal in 51°14′N 3°51′E / 51.233°N 3.850°E / 51.233; 3.850 (SMS V47).
V 48 6 Aug 1915 10 Dec 1915 sunk, 21.50 hrs, 31 May 1916, during the Battle of Jutland, in 57°1′N 6°0′E / 57.017°N 6.000°E / 57.017; 6.000 (SMS V48) (87 killed)

Mobilization Program 48 vessels ordered 6 Aug 1914 as part of the mobilization of the German armed forces for the First World War. The first two, S 49 and S 50 had been originally projected as replacements for S35 and S 36, which were sold to Greece in April 1914.

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S 49 10 Apr 1915 12 Jul 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 50 24 Apr 1915 15 Aug 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 51 29 Apr 1915 7 Sep 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; raised Jul 1919; to UK, 1920; scrapped, Rosyth, 1922.
S 52 12 Jun 1915 28 Sep 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 53 18 Sep 1915 17 Dec 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 54 11 Oct 1915 30 Jan 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to UK, 1920; scrapped Rosyth, 1922.
S 55 6 Nov 1915 6 Mar 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 56 11 Dec 1915 16 Apr 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 57 8 Jan 1916 5 May 1916 mined and sunk 22.18 hrs 10 Nov 1916, Gulf of Finland 59°21′N 22°29′E / 59.350°N 22.483°E / 59.350; 22.483 (SMS S57) (2 killed).
S 58 5 Feb 1916 4 Jun 1916 mined and sunk 04.25 hrs 11 Nov 1916, Gulf of Finland 59°22′N 22°48′E / 59.367°N 22.800°E / 59.367; 22.800 (SMS S58) (0 killed).
S 59 16 Feb 1916 3 Jul 1916 mined and sunk 05.48 hrs 11 Nov 1916, Gulf of Finland 59°21′N 22°45′E / 59.350°N 22.750°E / 59.350; 22.750 (SMS S59) (0 killed).
S 60 3 Apr 1916 15 Aug 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to Japan, 1920; scrapped 1920.
S 61 8 Apr 1916 20 Sep 1916 scuttled, Ghent–Terneuzen Canal, 2 Oct 1918 in 51°14′N 3°51′E / 51.233°N 3.850°E / 51.233; 3.850 (SMS S61).
S 62 13 May 1916 7 Nov 1916 mined and sunk 21.30 hrs 10 Jul 1918 in 54°47′N 4°52′E / 54.783°N 4.867°E / 54.783; 4.867 (SMS S62) (27 killed).
S 63 25 May 1916 18 Dec 1916 to Italy, 23 May 1920; commissioned as Ardimentoso(IT); scrapped, 1937.
S 64 21 Aug 1916 15 Mar 1917 mined and sunk during the Battle of Moon Sound, 01.00 hrs 18 Oct 1917 in 58°43′N 23°14′E / 58.717°N 23.233°E / 58.717; 23.233 (SMS S64) (6 killed).
S 65 14 Oct 1916 22 Apr 1917 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 66 21 Nov 1916 9 May 1917 mined and sunk 20.40 hrs 10 Jul 1918 in 54°47′N 4°52′E / 54.783°N 4.867°E / 54.783; 4.867 (SMS S66) (76 killed).
V 67 3 Aug 1915 1 Nov 1915 built at Hamburg; scuttled, Ghent–Terneuzen Canal, 2 Oct 1918 in 51°13′N 3°55′E / 51.217°N 3.917°E / 51.217; 3.917 (SMS V67).
V 68 24 Aug 1915 3 Dec 1915 built at Hamburg; mined and sunk 15.05 hrs 8 Aug 1918 in 51°33′N 3°15′E / 51.550°N 3.250°E / 51.550; 3.250 (SMS V68) (18 killed).
V 69 18 Aug 1915 9 Jan 1916 scuttled, Ghent, 2 Oct 1918 in 51°4′N 3°51′E / 51.067°N 3.850°E / 51.067; 3.850 (SMS V69).
V 70 14 Oct 1915 6 Jan 1916 built at Hamburg; Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
V 71 1 Sep 1915 10 Mar 1916 interned, Stockholm, 1918; to UK, 13 May 1920; scrapped 1921.
V 72 30 Dec 1915 28 Mar 1916 mined and sunk 03.45 hrs 11 Nov 1916, Gulf of Finland 59°23′N 22°51′E / 59.383°N 22.850°E / 59.383; 22.850 (SMS V72) (0 killed).
V 73 24 Sep 1915 16 Feb 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; scuttled 21 Jun 1919; to UK, 1920; scrapped Grangemouth 1922.
V 74 29 Oct 1915 28 Mar 1916 sunk in accidental explosion while loading mines, Zeebrugge, 25 May 1918 in 51°20′N 3°12′E / 51.333°N 3.200°E / 51.333; 3.200 (SMS V74); raised 17 Jul 1918; scuttled, Brugge, 3 Oct 1918 in 51°13′0″N 3°14′0″E / 51.21667°N 3.23333°E / 51.21667; 3.23333 (SMS V74).
V 75 15 Jan 1916 29 Apr 1916 built at Hamburg; mined and sunk 22.04 hrs 10 Nov 1916, Gulf of Finland 59°23′N 22°30′E / 59.383°N 22.500°E / 59.383; 22.500 (SMS V75) (3 killed).
V 76 27 Feb 1916 8 Jun 1916 built at Hamburg; mined and sunk 06.25 hrs 11 Nov 1916, Gulf of Finland 59°20′N 22°23′E / 59.333°N 22.383°E / 59.333; 22.383 (SMS V76) (1 killed).
V 77 28 Feb 1916 18 May 1916 built at Hamburg; scuttled, Ghent–Terneuzen Canal, 2 Oct 1918 in 51°13′N 3°55′E / 51.217°N 3.917°E / 51.217; 3.917 (SMS V77).
V 78 19 Feb 1916 18 May 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
V 79 18 Apr 1916 11 Jul 1916 built at Hamburg; to France, 14 Jun 1920; commissioned as Pierre Durand(FR); stricken from list 15 Feb 1933.
V 80 28 Apr 1916 6 Jul 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to Japan, 1920; scrapped, 1922.
V 81 27 May 1916 29 Jul 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to UK, 1920; scrapped.
V 82 5 Jul 1916 30 Aug 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to UK, 1920; after use as gunnery target, beached off Whale Island, Portsmouth Harbour 50°48′49″N 1°05′41″W / 50.81361°N 1.09472°W / 50.81361; -1.09472 (SMS V82), and partially scrapped, c. 1922 (remains still visible in Portsmouth harbour at low tide, 2016) [3]
V 83 10 Jun 1916 3 Oct 1916 built at Hamburg; Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
V 84 17 Aug 1916 6 Nov 1916 built at Hamburg; mined and sunk 26 May 1917 in 53°43′N 6°21′E / 53.717°N 6.350°E / 53.717; 6.350 (SMS V84) (5 killed).
G 85 24 Jul 1915 14 Dec 1915; sunk in action with HMS Broke and HMS Swift, second battle of the Dover strait, 21 Apr 1917 in 51°9′N 1°37′E / 51.150°N 1.617°E / 51.150; 1.617 (SMS G85) (35 killed).
G 86 24 Aug 1915 11 Jan 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
G 87 22 Sep 1915 10 Feb 1916 mined and sunk 06.20 hrs 30 Mar 1918 in 54°54′N 6°25′E / 54.900°N 6.417°E / 54.900; 6.417 (SMS G87) (43 killed).
G 88 16 Oct 1915 11 Mar 1916 torpedoed and sunk while at anchor off Zeebrugge by a Coastal Motor Boat of the 3rd CMB Division, 00.15 hrs 8 Apr 1917, in 51°22′N 3°15′E / 51.367°N 3.250°E / 51.367; 3.250 (SMS G88) (18 killed).
G 89 11 Dec 1915 10 May 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
G 90 15 Jan 1916 15 Jun 1916 mined and sunk 03.52 hrs 11 Nov 1916, Gulf of Finland 59°23′N 22°48′E / 59.383°N 22.800°E / 59.383; 22.800 (SMS G90) (11 killed).
G 91 16 Nov 1915 22 Jul 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
G 92 15 Feb 1916 25 Aug 1916 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
G 93 11 Jul 1916 27 Sep 1916 mined and sunk 06.30 hrs 30 Mar 1918 in 54°54′N 6°25′E / 54.900°N 6.417°E / 54.900; 6.417 (G93) (10 killed).
G 94 1 Aug 1916 26 Oct 1916 mined and sunk 05.40 hrs 30 Mar 1918 in 54°54′N 6°25′E / 54.900°N 6.417°E / 54.900; 6.417 (SMS G94) (13 killed).
G 95 19 Aug 1916 25 Nov 1916 to UK 5 Aug 1920; scrapped, Sunderland, 1921.
G 96 16 Sep 1916 23 Dec 1916 mined and sunk 01.30 hrs 26 Jun 1917 in 51°15′N 2°38.1′E / 51.250°N 2.6350°E / 51.250; 2.6350 (SMS G96) (4 killed).

Destroyers (Zerstörer)[edit]

Mobilization Program (Aug 1914)

Four vessels ordered on 7 Aug 1914 and 10 Aug 1914 to make use of machinery sets constructed in Germany for the Russian Orfey-class destroyers Leitenant Ilin, Kapitan Konon-Zotov, Gavriil and Michail.

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
B 97 15 Dec 1914 13 Feb 1915 to Italy 23 May 1920; commissioned as Cesare Rossarol(IT); stricken from the list 17 Jan 1939 and scrapped.
B 98 2 Jan 1915 24 Mar 1915 Postal vessel for the German fleet interned at Scapa Flow, 24 Jan 1919; scuttled, 21 Jun 1919.
V 99 9 Feb 1915 20 Apr 1915 mined and sunk 05.00 hrs 17 Aug 1915 off Miķeļtornis, Latvia in 57°37′N 21°52′E / 57.617°N 21.867°E / 57.617; 21.867 (SMS V99) (21 killed).
V 100 8 Mar 1915 17 Jun 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to France, 1920; scrapped, 1921 (boilers used to refit destroyer Aventurier).

October 1914 order

Vessel Launched Completed Fate

.

B 109 11 Mar 1915 8 Jun 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
B 110 31 Mar 1915 26 Jun 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
B 111 8 Jun 1915 10 Aug 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
B 112 17 Jun 1915 3 Sep 1915 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919

ex-Argentinian vessels Requisitioned 15 Aug 1914.

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
G 101 12 Aug 1914 4 Mar 1915 ex Santiago del Estero; Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
G 102 16 Sep 1914 8 Apr 1915 ex San Luis; Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to USA, 1920; sunk as aircraft target, 13 Jul 1921 off Cape Henry.
G 103 14 Nov 1914 15 May 1915 ex Santa Fé; Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
G 104 28 Nov 1914 5 Jun 1915 ex Tucuman; Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919

ex-Netherlands Torpedoboats[edit]

Designed and built as Z1 - Z4 for the Netherlands, seized 10 Aug 1914.

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
V 105 26 Aug 1914 5 Jan 1915 to Brazil, 20 Aug 1920; sold to Britain, and exchanged with A 69 with Poland; commissioned as Polish Mazur; sunk by German aircraft 1 Sep 39 at Gdynia; later raised and scrapped.
V 106 26 Aug 1914 25 Jan 1915 to Brazil 20 Aug 1920; scrapped.
V 107 12 Dec 1914 3 Mar 1915 mined and sunk 8 May 1915 off Libau in 56°33′N 20°58′E / 56.550°N 20.967°E / 56.550; 20.967 (SMS V107) (1 killed).
V 108 12 Dec 1914 23 Mar 1915 to Poland 20 Aug 1920; commissioned as Kaszub; sunk due to boiler explosion, 20 Jul 1925, Gdańsk Nowy Port; later raised and scrapped.

Type 1916[edit]

Apr 1916 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
S 113 31 Jan 1918 5 Aug 1919 removed from service 5 Nov 1919; delivered to France, 23 May 1920 at Cherbourg; commissioned as Amiral Sénès(FR); decommissioned, 1936; sunk as target, 1938.
S 114 11 Apr 1918 about 75% finished; sold 3 Nov 1919 ; scrapped Bremerhaven.
S 115 20 Jun 1918 about 60% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; later scrapped at Bremerhaven.
V 116 2 Mar 1918 31 Jul 1918 to Italy 23 May 1920; commissioned as Premuda(IT); scrapped, 1939.
V 117 4 May 1918 about 75% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; scrapped, Hamburg, 1921.
V 118 6 Jul 1918 about 60% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; scrapped, Hamburg, 1921.
G 119 8 Oct 1918 about 90% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; later scrapped at Kiel.
G 120 about 75% finished (but not launched); sold, 3 Nov 1919; scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
G 121 about 68% finished (but not launched); sold, 3 Nov 1919; scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
B 122 16 Oct 1917 about 65% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; scrapped, Kiel, 1921.
B 123 26 Oct 1918 about 50% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; scrapped, Hamburg, 1921.
B 124 6 Jun 1919 about 40% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; scrapped, Hamburg, 1921

1916 Mobilization Type[edit]

June 1916 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
V 125 18 May 1917 29 Aug 1917 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to UK, 1920; scrapped, Newport, 1922.
V 126 30 Jun 1917 25 Sep 1917 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to France, 1920; scrapped, (boilers used to refit destroyer Intrepide).
V 127 28 Jul 1917 23 Oct 1917 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to Japan, 1920; scrapped, Dordrecht, 1922.
V 128 11 Aug 1917 15 Nov 1917 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to UK, 1920; scrapped, Grangemouth, 1922.
V 129 19 Oct 1917 20 Dec 1917 Interned, Scapa Flow, 6 Dec 1918 (as replacement for V 30, which was lost en route to the surrender); scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
V 130 20 Nov 1917 2 Feb 1918 to France, 3 Aug 1920; commissioned as Buino (FR); removed from active service, 15 Feb 1933.
S 131 3 Mar 1917 11 Aug 1917 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 132 19 May 1917 2 Oct 1917 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to USA, 1920;[4] sunk as gunnery target by USS Delaware (BB-28) and destroyer USS Herbert (DD-160) off Cape Henry, 15 Jul 1921.
S 133 1 Sep 1917 21 Feb 1918 to France, 20 Jul 1920; commissioned as Chastang(FR); removed from active service, 18 Aug 1933.
S 134 25 Aug 1917 4 Jan 1918 to France 14 Jun 1920; commissioned as Vesco(FR); removed from active service, 24 Jul 1935.
S 135 27 Oct 1917 15 Mar 1918 to France 20 Jul 1920; commissioned as Mazaré(FR); removed from active service, 24 Jul 1935.
S 136 1 Dec 1917 30 Apr 1918 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 137 9 Mar 1918 14 Jun 1918 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; beached while attempting to scuttle, 21 Jun 1919; to UK, 1920; scrapped, 1922.
S 138 22 Apr 1918 29 Jul 1918 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
S 139 24 Nov 1917 15 Apr 1918 to France 20 Jul 1920; commissioned as Deligny(FR); removed from active service, 18 Aug 1933.

Nov 1916 Program

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
V 140 22 Dec 1917 18 Nov 1918 built at Hamburg; sold 3 Nov 1919; stranded on Danish coast on route to breakers, 8 Dec 1920 and scrapped in situ.
V 141 26 Mar 1918 built at Hamburg; about 60% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; later scrapped, Kiel.
V 142 25 Sep 1918 about 40% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; later scrapped, Kiel.
V 143 25 Sep 1918 about 40% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; later scrapped, Kiel.
V 144 10 Oct 1918 less than 40% finished; sold, 3 Nov 1919; later scrapped, Kiel.
H 145 11 Dec 1917 4 Aug 1918 Interned, Scapa Flow, 22 Nov 1918; scuttled 21 Jun 1919.
H 146 23 Jan 1918 3 Oct 1918 to France 23 May 1920; commissioned as Rageot de la Touche(FR); removed from active service, 1935.
H 147 13 Mar 1918 13 Jul 1920 to France 23 May 1920; commissioned as Marcel Delage(FR); removed from active service, 1935.

1917 Program Total: 22 vessels (none completed).

Vessel Launched Completed Fate.
G 148 cancelled 3 Nov 1919 and scrapped on slip.
G 149 cancelled 3 Nov 1919 and scrapped on slip.
G 150 cancelled 3 Nov 1919 and scrapped on slip.
Ww 151 nearly ready for launching at the time of the armistice; cancelled and scrapped on slip, 1920.
S 152 1918 c. 40%-50% finished at time of armistice; stricken 3 Nov 1919; incomplete hull sold for scrap, c. 1920.
S 153 1918 c. 40%-50% finished at time of armistice; stricken 3 Nov 1919; incomplete hull sold for scrap, c. 1920; stranded off Neukrug while transferring to Kiel for demolition; later raised and scrapped.
S 154 1918 c. 40%-50% finished at time of armistice; stricken 3 Nov 1919; incomplete hull sold for scrap, c. 1920.
S 155 1918 c. 40%-50% finished at time of armistice; stricken 3 Nov 1919; incomplete hull sold for scrap, c. 1920.
S156 1918 c. 40%-50% finished at time of armistice; stricken 3 Nov 1919; incomplete hull sold for scrap, c. 1920; stranded off Neukrug while transferring to Kiel for demolition; later raised and scrapped.
S157 1918 c. 40%-50% finished at time of armistice; stricken 3 Nov 1919; incomplete hull sold for scrap, c. 1920.
V158 1 Nov 1918 c. 40% finished at time of armistice; stricken 3 Nov 1919; incomplete hull sold, 4 Jul 1920; scrapped Hamburg.
V159 1 Nov 1918 c. 40% finished at time of armistice; stricken 3 Nov 1919; incomplete hull sold, 4 Jul 1920; scrapped Hamburg.
V 160 11 Mar 1921 cancelled; stranded off Hiddensee, Sassnitz while on tow to breakers; subsequently raised and scrapped .
V 161 cancelled and scrapped on slip.
V 162 cancelled and scrapped on slip.
V 163 cancelled and scrapped on slip.
V 164 cancelled and scrapped on slip.
V 165 cancelled and scrapped on slip.
H 166 25 Oct 1919 c. 55%-60% finished; stricken 3 Nov 1919, sold 1920 and scrapped Kiel.
H 167 26 Oct 1918 c. 55%-60% finished; stricken 3 Nov 1919, sold 1920 and scrapped Kiel.
H 168 8 Nov 1919 c. 55%-60% finished; stricken 3 Nov 1919, sold 1920 and scrapped Kiel.
H 169 19 Oct 1918 c. 55%-60% finished; stricken 3 Nov 1919, sold 1920 and scrapped Kiel.

1918 Mobilization Type[edit]

The final First World War-era German torpedo boat design were large (1,268 tons) vessels with geared turbines and a heavy armament (4-105mm guns and 6–50 cm torpedo tubes).

Jan 1918 Program V 170-V 177, S 178-S 185 and H 186-H 193 (24 vessels in total; none completed). None had been launched by the time of the armistice, after which all contracts were cancelled.[f]

Jun 1918 Program H 194-H 202, V 203-V 210 and S 211-S 223 (30 vessels in total, none completed). None of these proceeded further than a very preliminary stage of construction; all were cancelled after the armistice.

Tactical Organization[edit]

As an indication of the employment of the Imperial German Navy's large torpedo boats, the following provide skeleton orders of battle for these vessels at various dates during the First World War. The basic tactical unit was the Torpedo-Boat Flotilla, consisting of two half-flotillas (typically five vessels each) plus one vessel for the flotilla commander.[g]

Mid-October 1914[edit]

This list shows the dispositions early in the war, after mobilization was complete [5]
High Seas Fleet
I. TBF: V 191 (leader); 1. hf: V 186, V 190, V 188, G 197, V 189; 2. hf: G 196, G 193, G 195, G 192, G 194
II. TBF: S 149 (leader); 3. hf: S 138, S 139, S 141, S 140, S 142; 4. hf: S 144, S 145, S 147, S 146, S 148
III. TBF: S 167 (leader); 5. hf: V 162, V 163, V 164, S 165, S 166; 6. hf: G 173, G 169, G 172, G 170, S 168
IV. TBF: T 113 (leader); 7. hf: S 119, S 122, S 117, S 118, S 115; 8. hf: S 128, T 111, S 129, S 126, T 110
V. TBF: G 12 (leader); 9. hf: V 6, V 1, V 3, V 4, V 5; 10. hf: G 11, G 9, G 7, G 8, G 10
VI. TBF: V 150 (leader); 11. hf: V 151, V 153, V 154, V 152, V 155; 12. hf: V 156, V 157, V 159, V 158, V 160
VII. TBF: S 24 (leader); 13. hf: S 14, S 15, S 13, S 16, S 18; 14. hf: S 19, S 21, S 23, S 20, S 22
VIII. TBF: G 174 (leader); 15. hf: V 181, V 183, V 182, S 130, S 131; 16. hf: S 176, S 177, S 179, V 180, G 175
IX. TBF: S 28 (leader); 17. hf: V 25, V 26, V 27, S 31, S 32; 18. hf: V 30, V 29, S 33, S 34, S 35, S 36
tenders to U-Boat Flotillas: T 109, T 99, T 100, T 101
fleet tenders (attached to fleet flagship, battle Squadrons etc.): T 98, T 96

Other areas
Baltic: 19. hf: S 120, G 134, S 124, S 127, T 97; 20. hf: G 133, G 132, G 135, G 136
Coastal Defense: Jade/Weser Division : T 91, T 93, T 94, T 95, T 107; Elbe Division: S 114
East Asia: S 90

May 1916[edit]

The following list of front line torpedo boats reflects the situation immediately prior to the Battle of Jutland.[5]
High Seas Fleet
I. TBF: S 32 (leader); 1. hf: G 39, G 40, G 38, V 190, G 197; 2. hf: G 192, G 195, G 196, G 193
II. TBF: B 98 (leader); 3. hf: G 101, G 102, B 112, B 97; 4. hf: B 109, B 110, B 111, G 103, G 104
III. TBF: S 53 (leader); 5. hf: V 71, V 73, V 74, G 88, G 85; 6. hf: V 48, V 70, S 55, S 54, G 42
V. TBF: G 11 (leader); 9. hf: V 6, V 2, V 3, V 1, V 4; 10. hf: G 8, G 7, V 5, G 9, G 10
VI. TBF: G 41 (leader); 11. hf: V 44, S 49, V 43, G 87, G 86; 12. hf: V 69, S 50, V 46, V 45, G 37
VII. TBF: S 24 (leader); 13. hf: S 15, S 17, S 20, S 16, S 18; 14. hf: S 19, S 23, V 186, V 189
IX. TBF: V 28 (leader); 17. hf: V 27, V 26, S 36, S51, S 52; 18. hf: V 30, S 34, S 33, V 29, S 35

Baltic
VI. Scouting Group: V 100
IV. TBF: V 160 (leader); 7. hf: V 154, G 133, S 140, S 143, S 145, V 151, V 152, V 155, V 157, V 158, V 161
VIII. TBF: S 178 (leader); 15. hf: V 183, V 182, V 181, V 185, V 184; 16. hf: S 176, V 180, G 174, S 179, G 175
X. TBF: S 56 (leader); 19. hf: V 78, S 143, S 148, S 147, S 139; 20. hf: V 72, V 75, S 57, G 89, V 77
attached: T 107, S 146; 21. hf: S 167, G 169, G 170, S 168, G 137.

Flanders
Destroyer Flotilla: hf Cleve: V 67, V 68, V 47

Auxiliary service
Minesweeper flotillas: T 103, S 149, G 136, T 104
North Sea patrol flotillas: S 127, S 128; coastal defence: T 93, S 131, T 110, T 106, T 97, T 105, G 135, T 112, T 113, S 114, S 120, S 138
Tenders to U-Boat flotillas: T 159, T 99, G 137, T 101, G 132; fleet tenders: T 96, T 98
Training: G 134, S 126, S 122, S 121, S 131, V106, V 108, T 102, T 108, V 105, S 130, S 125

April 1918[edit]

The following is the situation in the North Sea at the end of April 1918, at the time of the last offensive sortie of the High Seas Fleet.[6]

High Seas Fleet
I. TBF: V 129 (leader); 1. hf: G 39, G 38, G 40, G 86, S 32; 2. hf: V 130, S 135, S 133, S 134, S 139
II. TBF: B 97 (leader); 3. hf: G 101, G 103, V 100, G 104, G 102; 4. hf: B 109, B 110, B 112, B 98, B 111
V. TBF: G 11 (leader); 9. hf: V 6, S 23, V 3, V 2, V 1, T 196, T 197; 10. hf: G 8, V 5, G 10, G 7, G 9, T 183, T 181
VI. TBF: V 128 (leader); 11. hf: V 127, V 126, S 131, V 125, S 132; 12. hf: V 43, V 45, S 50, S 49, V 46, V 44
VII. TBF: S 62 (leader); 13. hf: V 78, S 65, S 66, V 83, S 56; 14. hf: T 182, G 92, G 89 (G 87, G 93, G 94 were all sunk 30 Mar 1918)
VIII. TBF: T 180 (leader) ; 15. hf: T 193, T 195, T 192, T 189, T 190; 16. hf: T 176, T 178, T 174, T 179, T 186
IX. TBF: V 78 (leader); 17. hf: V 80, S 52, S 51, S 60, S 36; 18. hf: V 30, V 26, V 28, S 34, S 33
Serving with Mine-sweeping Flotillas: T 103, T 184, T 149, T 132
I. GF; 1. hf: T 127, T 114, T 109, T 101, T 125, T 112, T 99, T 106, T 102, T 105, T 93; 2. hf: T 185, S 19, S 24, T 122, T 148, S 18, T 135, T 147, T 131, T 196, T 197; 3. hf: T 136, T 92, T 104, T 128, T 138, T 97
II. GF: T 128; 5. hf: T 99; 6. hf: T 97; 7. hf: T 125; 8. hf: T 114; 9. hf: T 102; 10. hf: T 92, T 128; (T 103 repairing)

September 1918[edit]

The following is the disposition of all of Germany's ocean-going torpedo boats shortly before the end of the war.[7]

High Seas Fleet
I. TBF: 1. hf: V 129, S 32, G 38, G 39, G 40, G 86; 2. hf: V 130, S 134, S 133, S 135, S 139
II. TBF: 3. hf: B 98, G 101, G 102, G 103, G 104, V 100; 4. hf: B 97, B 109, B 110, B 111, B 112
V. TBF: 9. hf: G 11, V 1, V 2, V 3, V 6, S 23; 10. hf: V 5, G 7, G 8, G 10
VI. TBF: 11. hf: V 128, V 125, V 126, V 127, S 131, S 132; 12. hf: V 43, V 44, V 45, V 46, S 49, S 50
VII. TBF: (V 116 to join); 13. hf: V 83, V 78, S 65, S 56 (S 138 to join); 14. hf: G 92, G 89 (S 136, S 137, H145 to join)
VIII. TBF: 15. hf: T 180, T 189, T 190, T 193, T 195; 16. hf: T 174, T 176, T 178, T 179, T 186
IX. TBF: 17. hf: V 79, S 36, S 51, S 52, S 60, V 80; 18. hf: V 26, V 28, V 30, S 33, S 34
I. GF: 1. hf: T 127, T 109, T 112, T 93, T 170, T 165, T 182, T 183, T 181; 2. hf: T 185, S 19, S 24, T 122, T 148, T 113, S 18, T 135, T 147, T 131, T 197, T 196; 3. hf: T 136, T 169 (plus twelve "A" Boats)
II. GF: 5. hf: T 99; 6. hf: T 97; 7. hf: T 125; 8. hf: T 114; 9. hf: T 102; 10. hf: T 92, T 128; (T 103 repairing)
Serving with Mine-sweeping Flotillas: T 184, T 132, T 96, T 98

Baltic
IV. TBF: 7. hf: T 160, T 133, T 139, T 140, T 143, T 145, T 151, T 152, T 154; 19. hf: T 155, T 157, T 158, T 104, T 106, T 175, T 101, T 105

Flanders
III. TBF: 5. hf: V 71, S 53, V 73, V 81, G 41, V 77; 6. hf: S 54, S 55, V 70, G 91
Flanders Destroyer Flotilla: 1. hf: V 47, V 67, G 95, S 61; 2. hf: S 63, V 69, V 82
out of service: S 15, V 74

Auxiliary service
Baltic Training Flotilla: 1. hf: T 173, T 166, T 134, V 108, T 107; 2. hf: T 167, T 163, T 142, T 126
Gunnery training: T 144, T 146, T 168, V 105
Mine warfare vessels: V 106, T 110, T 120
Tenders to U-boat flotillas: T 130, T 137, T 153, T 159, T 161, T 164, T 108, T 121
Fleet tenders, etc.: T 91, T 94, T 95, T 111, T 156, T 141.

Explanatory Notes[edit]

  1. ^ In 1911 there was a radical departure from previous practice, when a smaller, more nimble design of torpedo-boat was introduced (the Type 1911). Because of this change, it was decided to re-start the number series; to avoid duplication of designations, the older vessels were progressively re-designated with the initial letter T.
  2. ^ Including cancelled vessels and vessels ordered by the German navy but sold to foreign powers before completion.
  3. ^ Nearly all of the A.G. Vulcan vessels were built at Stettin; the exceptions were V 67, V 68, V 70, V 75, V76, V77, V79, V 83, V 84 V 140 and V 141, which were constructed at Hamburg.
  4. ^ constructed to a Germaniawerft design.
  5. ^ Steam turbines and oil fuel were introduced in British destroyers with the Tribal Class of 1905; geared turbines in the R Class of 1915. Excluding experimental vessels, turbines became standard in German torpedo-boats with the 1908 program; coal fuel did not disappear until the Type 1913; geared turbines were to be introduced in the projected vessels of 1918.
  6. ^ Four incomplete hulls were completed as mercantile vessels in 1920-21: S 178 and S 179 were completed as the four-masted schooners Franziska Kimme and Georg Kimme for the Bremerhaven Line (Bremerhavener Reederei AG) in 1920; and in November 1919, the incomplete hulls of ex-H 186 and ex-H 187 were purchased by the Baltic Shipping Company (Baltischen Reederei), Hamburg and completed as the cargo ships Hansdorf and Hoisdorf, entering service in spring 1921.
  7. ^ The following abbreviations are used for brevity: TBF: Torpedo-Boat Flotilla (Torpedoboots Flottille in German); hf: Half-Flotilla (halbsflottille) (despite the name, a flotilla could consist of more than two half-flotillas); GF: Escort Flotilla (Geleit Flottille).

Related Wikipedia Articles[edit]

English language

German language

Further reading[edit]

Published Works (in English)

  • Robert Gardiner, editor, Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships 1906-1921. (London: Conway Maritime Press, 1985). ISBN 0-85177-245-5
  • Erich Gröner, German Warships 1815–1945, Volume 1: Major Surface Vessels (London: Conway Maritime Press, 1990). ISBN 0-85177-533-0
  • John C. Taylor, German Warships of World War I (London: Ian Allen Ltd., 1969). ISBN 0-71100-099-9

Websites

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gardiner, Conways 1906-1921, p.164
  2. ^ "V 43 in Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships". US Navy. Ships History Branch. Retrieved 12 April 2014. 
  3. ^ a b "German WWI warships rediscovered in Portsmouth Harbour after lying forgotten for decades". The Independent. Retrieved 15 April 2016. 
  4. ^ "S 132 in Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships". US Navy. Ships History Branch. Retrieved 12 April 2014. 
  5. ^ a b Kontreadmiral a.D. Stoelzel, Ehrenrangliste der Kaiserlich Deutschen Marine 1914-18 (Thormannn and Goetsch, Berlin, 1930), pp 11-86.
  6. ^ Walter Gladisch, Der Krieg zur See, 1914-18: Der krieg in der Nordsee v. 7, (Frankfurt, E.S. Mittler & Sohn, 1965), pp. 175-178.
  7. ^ Paul Köppen, Der Krieg zur See, 1914-18: Entworfen and Die Überwasserstreitkräfte und ihre Technik, (Berlin, E.S. Mittler & Sohn, 1930.) pp. 291-292.