German submarine U-100 (1940)

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U100.jpg
U-100
History
Nazi Germany
Name: U-100
Ordered: 15 December 1937
Builder: Germaniawerft, Kiel
Yard number: 594
Laid down: 22 May 1939
Launched: 10 April 1940
Commissioned: 30 May 1940
Fate: Sunk 17 March 1941 by British warships
General characteristics
Class and type: Type VIIB submarine
Displacement:
  • 753 tonnes (741 long tons) surfaced
  • 857 t (843 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 6.20 m (20 ft 4 in) o/a
  • 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Height: 9.50 m (31 ft 2 in)
Draught: 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in)
Installed power:
  • 2,800–3,200 PS (2,100–2,400 kW; 2,800–3,200 bhp) (diesels)
  • 750 PS (550 kW; 740 shp) (electric)
Propulsion:
Range:
  • 8,700 nmi (16,100 km; 10,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
  • 90 nmi (170 km; 100 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth:
  • 220 m (720 ft)
  • Crush depth: 230–250 m (750–820 ft)
Complement: 4 officers, 40–56 enlisted
Sensors and
processing systems:
Gruppenhorchgerät
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
  • Kptlt. Joachim Schepke[1]
  • 30 May 1940 – 17 March 1941
Operations:
  • Six patrols
  • 1st patrol: 9 August – 1 September 1940
  • 2nd patrol: 11–25 September 1940
  • 3rd patrol: 12–23 October 1940
  • 4th patrol: 7–27 November 1940
  • 5th patrol: 2 December 1940 – 1 January 1941
  • 6th patrol: 9 – 17 March 1941
Victories:
  • 25 ships sunk for a total of 135,614 GRT
  • Four ships damaged for a total of 17,229 GRT
  • One ship a total loss of 2,205 GRT

German submarine U-100 was a Type VIIB U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II. She, given her short-lived existence, was one of the most successful and deadly U-Boats to have served in the conflict.

Design[edit]

German Type VIIB submarines were preceded by the shorter Type VIIA submarines. U-100 had a displacement of 753 tonnes (741 long tons) when at the surface and 857 tonnes (843 long tons) while submerged.[2] She had a total length of 66.50 m (218 ft 2 in), a pressure hull length of 48.80 m (160 ft 1 in), a beam of 6.20 m (20 ft 4 in), a height of 9.50 m (31 ft 2 in), and a draught of 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in). The submarine was powered by two Germaniawerft F46 four-stroke, six-cylinder supercharged diesel engines producing a total of 2,800 to 3,200 metric horsepower (2,060 to 2,350 kW; 2,760 to 3,160 shp) for use while surfaced, two BBC GG UB 720/8 double-acting electric motors producing a total of 750 metric horsepower (550 kW; 740 shp) for use while submerged. She had two shafts and two 1.23 m (4 ft) propellers. The boat was capable of operating at depths of up to 230 metres (750 ft).[2]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 17.9 knots (33.2 km/h; 20.6 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph).[2] When submerged, the boat could operate for 90 nautical miles (170 km; 100 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 8,700 nautical miles (16,100 km; 10,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph). U-100 was fitted with five 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (four fitted at the bow and one at the stern), fourteen torpedoes, one 8.8 cm (3.46 in) SK C/35 naval gun, 220 rounds, and one 2 cm (0.79 in) anti-aircraft gun The boat had a complement of between forty-four and sixty.[2]

Service history[edit]

First patrol[edit]

The boat was launched on 10 April 1940, with a crew of 53, under the command of Kapitänleutnant Joachim Schepke. On her first active patrol, U-100 came into contact with two Allied convoys, OA-198 and OA-204. She shadowed both convoys.

Second patrol[edit]

U-100 departed for her second active patrol on 11 September 1940, coming into contact with the Allied convoy HX 72.

Third patrol[edit]

After resupplying, U-100 departed for her third active patrol on 12 October 1940. She came into contact with two Allied convoys, HX-79 and SC-7.

Fourth patrol[edit]

U-100 departed on her fourth patrol on 7 November 1940. On 22 November she came into contact with the Allied convoy SC-11 and began to shadow it.

Fifth patrol[edit]

U-100 left for her fifth active patrol on 2 December 1940, sinking two vessels from Convoy OB 256, then a third solo vessel.

Sixth and final patrol[edit]

U-100 departed on her sixth and what would be her final patrol on 9 March 1941. She approached convoy HX 112 from astern in the pre-dawn hours of 17 March, but was detected at a range of 1,000 meters by the Type 286 radar aboard HMS Vanoc.[3] U-100 was the first U-boat to be so discovered during World War II; she was rammed and sunk by Vanoc while attempting to submerge.[4] Another destroyer, HMS Walker, was also present.[5] Six of the boat's 53 crew members survived, spending the remainder of the war as POWs. Schepke was not one of them.

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Ship Flag Tonnage
(GRT)
Fate
16 August 1940 Empire Merchant  United Kingdom 4,864 Sunk
25 August 1940 Jamaica Pioneer  United Kingdom 5,471 Sunk
29 August 1940 Dalblair  United Kingdom 4,608 Sunk
29 August 1940 Hartismere  United Kingdom 5,498 Damaged
29 August 1940 Astra II  United Kingdom 2,393 Sunk
29 August 1940 Alida Gorthon  Sweden 2,373 Sunk
29 August 1940 Empire Moose  United Kingdom 6,103 Sunk
21 September 1940 Canonesa  United Kingdom 8,286 Sunk
21 September 1940 Torinia  United Kingdom 10,364 Sunk
21 September 1940 Dalcairn  United Kingdom 4,608 Sunk
22 September 1940 Empire Airman  United Kingdom 6,586 Sunk
22 September 1940 Scholar  United Kingdom 3,940 Sunk
22 September 1940 Frederick S. Fales  United Kingdom 10,525 Sunk
22 September 1940 Simla  Norway 6,031 Sunk
18 October 1940 Shekatika  United Kingdom 5,458 Damaged
18 October 1940 Boekelo  Netherlands 2,118 Damaged
19 October 1940 Blairspey  United Kingdom 4,155 Damaged
20 October 1940 Caprella  United Kingdom 8,230 Sunk
20 October 1940 Sitala  United Kingdom 6,218 Sunk
20 October 1940 Loch Lomond  United Kingdom 5,452 Sunk
23 November 1940 Justitia  United Kingdom 4,562 Sunk
23 November 1940 Bradfyne  United Kingdom 4,740 Sunk
23 November 1940 Ootmarsum  Netherlands 3,628 Sunk
23 November 1940 Bruse  Norway 2,205 Total Loss
23 November 1940 Salonica  Norway 2,694 Sunk
23 November 1940 Leise Maersk  United Kingdom 3,136 Sunk
23 November 1940 Bussum  Netherlands 3,636 Sunk
14 December 1940 Kyleglen  United Kingdom 3,670 Sunk
14 December 1940 Euphorbia  United Kingdom 3,380 Sunk
18 December 1940 Napier Star  United Kingdom 10,116 Sunk
Sunk 137,819
Damaged 17,229
Total 155,048

References[edit]

  1. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Joachim Schepke (Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 17 May 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d Gröner 1991, pp. 43–44.
  3. ^ Rohwer & Hummelchen (1992) p. 54
  4. ^ Macintyre, Donald, CAPT RN "Shipborne Radar" United States Naval Institute Proceedings September 1967 pp. 78–79
  5. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "The Type VIIB boat U-100". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. .

Bibliography[edit]

  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). German U-boat commanders of World War II : a biographical dictionary. Translated by Brooks, Geoffrey. London, Annapolis, Md: Greenhill Books, Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-186-6. 
  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945 [German U-boat losses from September 1939 to May 1945]. Der U-Boot-Krieg (in German). IV. Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler. ISBN 3-8132-0514-2. 
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4. 
  • Rohwer, J.; Hummelchen, G. (1992). Chronology of the War at Sea 1939-1945. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-105-X. 
  • Kemp, Paul (1997). U-Boats Destroyed - German Submarine Losses in the World Wars. Arms and Armour Press. p. 69. ISBN 1-85409-321-5. 

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 61°04′N 11°30′W / 61.067°N 11.500°W / 61.067; -11.500