German submarine U-1019

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U995 2004 1.jpg
U-995 Type VIIC/41 at the Laboe Naval Memorial. This U-boat is almost identical to U-1019.
History
Nazi Germany
Name: U-1019
Ordered: 13 June 1942
Builder: Blohm & Voss, Hamburg
Yard number: 219
Laid down: 28 April 1943
Launched: 22 March 1944
Commissioned: 4 May 1944
Fate: Surrendered, 9 May 1945
Status: Sunk, 7 December 1945
General characteristics
Type: Type VIIC/41 submarine
Displacement:
  • 757 long tons (769 t) surfaced
  • 857 long tons (871 t) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 6.20 m (20 ft 4 in) o/a
  • 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Height: 9.60 m (31 ft 6 in)
Draught: 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in)
Installed power:
  • 2 × diesel engines
  • 2,800–3,200 PS (2,100–2,400 kW; 2,800–3,200 bhp) (diesels)
  • 750 PS (550 kW; 740 shp) (electric)
Propulsion:
Speed:
  • 17.7 knots (32.8 km/h; 20.4 mph) surfaced
  • 7.6 knots (14.1 km/h; 8.7 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 8,500 nmi (15,700 km; 9,800 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
  • 80 nmi (150 km; 92 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth:
  • 250 m (820 ft)
  • Calculated crush depth: 250–295 m (820–968 ft)
Complement: 44-52 officers & ratings
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
Operations: 1 patrol
Victories: None

German submarine U-1019 was a Type VIIC/41 U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

She was ordered on 13 June 1942, and was laid down on 28 April 1943, at Blohm & Voss, Hamburg, as yard number 219. She was launched on 22 March 1944, and commissioned under the command of Oberleutnant zur See Hans Rinck on 4 May 1944.[2]

Design[edit]

German Type VIIC/41 submarines were preceded by the heavier Type VIIC submarines. U-1019 had a displacement of 769 tonnes (757 long tons) when at the surface and 871 tonnes (857 long tons) while submerged. She had a total length of 67.10 m (220 ft 2 in), a pressure hull length of 50.50 m (165 ft 8 in), an overall beam of 6.20 m (20 ft 4 in), a height of 9.60 m (31 ft 6 in), and a draught of 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in). The submarine was powered by two Germaniawerft F46 four-stroke, six-cylinder supercharged diesel engines producing a total of 2,800 to 3,200 metric horsepower (2,060 to 2,350 kW; 2,760 to 3,160 shp) for use while surfaced, two BBC GG UB 720/8 double-acting electric motors producing a total of 750 metric horsepower (550 kW; 740 shp) for use while submerged. She had two shafts and two 1.23 m (4 ft) propellers. The boat was capable of operating at depths of up to 230 metres (750 ft).[3]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 17.7 knots (32.8 km/h; 20.4 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 7.6 knots (14.1 km/h; 8.7 mph). When submerged, the boat could operate for 80 nautical miles (150 km; 92 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 8,500 nautical miles (15,700 km; 9,800 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph). U-1019 was fitted with five 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (four fitted at the bow and one at the stern), fourteen torpedoes or 26 TMA or TMB Naval mines, one 8.8 cm (3.46 in) SK C/35 naval gun, (220 rounds), one 3.7 cm (1.5 in) Flak M42 and two 2 cm (0.79 in) C/30 anti-aircraft guns. The boat had a complement of between forty-four and fifty-two.[3]

Service history[edit]

U-1019 had a Schnorchel underwater-breathing apparatus fitted out sometime before February 1945.[2]

On 1 February 1945, U-1019 left Horten on her first, and only, war patrol. Sixteen days into her patrol, 16 February 1945, U-1019 was attack by a Polish manned Wellington of the 304/Q Squadron RAF west of the Hebrides, she suffered only moderate damage. She arrived at Trondheim on 9 April 1945, after 68 days on patrol with no further incidents.[2]

U-1019 surrendered on 9 May 1945, at Trondheim and was transferred on 29 May 1945, to Loch Ryan. Of the 156 U-boats that eventually surrendered to the Allied forces at the end of the war, U-1019 was one of 116 selected to take part in Operation Deadlight. U-1019 was towed out and sank on 7 December 1945, by naval gunfire.[2]

The wreck now lies at 55°27′N 07°56′W / 55.450°N 7.933°W / 55.450; -7.933Coordinates: 55°27′N 07°56′W / 55.450°N 7.933°W / 55.450; -7.933.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Hans Rinck". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 24 March 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-1019". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 24 March 2016. 
  3. ^ a b Gröner 1991, pp. 43-44.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). German U-boat commanders of World War II : a biographical dictionary. Translated by Brooks, Geoffrey. London, Annapolis, Md: Greenhill Books, Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-186-6. 
  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945 [German U-boat losses from September 1939 to May 1945]. Der U-Boot-Krieg (in German). IV. Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler. ISBN 3-8132-0514-2. 
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4. 

External links[edit]