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German submarine U-105 (1940)

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U-110 and HMS Bulldog.jpg
U-110, a U-boat of the same type as U-105
History
Nazi Germany
Name: U-105
Ordered: 24 May 1938[1]
Builder: DeSchiMAG AG Weser, Bremen[1]
Yard number: 968[1]
Laid down: 16 November 1939[1]
Launched: 15 June 1940[1]
Commissioned: 10 September 1940[1]
Homeport: Lorient, France[2]
Fate: Sunk on 2 June 1943 near Dakar by French Potez-CAMS 141 flying boat Antarès. 53 dead (all hands lost)[1][3]
General characteristics
Class and type: German Type IXB submarine
Displacement:
  • 1,051 t (1,034 long tons) surfaced
  • 1,178 t (1,159 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 6.76 m (22 ft 2 in) o/a
  • 4.40 m (14 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Draught: 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in)
Speed:
  • 18.2 knots (33.7 km/h; 20.9 mph) surfaced
  • 7.3 knots (13.5 km/h; 8.4 mph) submerged
Range:
  • 12,000 nmi (22,000 km; 14,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
  • 64 nmi (119 km; 74 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Identification codes: M 22 946
Commanders:
Operations: Nine patrols[2]
Victories: 23 ships sunk for a total of 125,470 GRT[4]

German submarine U-105 was a Type IXB U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine. She was ordered in May 1938 as part of Germany's naval rearmament program. Her keel was laid down in Bremen in November 1938. After roughly seven months of construction, she was launched in June 1940 and formally commissioned into the Kriegsmarine in September 1940.

During her three-year career, U-105 sank 23 vessels for a total loss of 125,470 gross register tons (GRT) before being sunk by the Free French Forces off the coast of Dakar (Senegal) in June 1943.

Construction and design[edit]

Construction[edit]

U-105 was ordered by Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine on 24 May 1938; her keel was laid down on 16 November 1938 by DeSchiMAG AG Weser in Bremen as yard number 968. She was launched on 15 June 1940 and commissioned on 10 September under the command of Kapitänleutnant Georg Schewe.[1]

Design[edit]

German Type IXB submarines were slightly larger than the original German Type IX submarines, later designated IXA. U-105 had a displacement of 1,051 tonnes (1,034 long tons) when at the surface and 1,178 tonnes (1,159 long tons) while submerged.[5] The U-boat had a total length of 76.50 m (251 ft), a pressure hull length of 58.75 m (192 ft 9 in), a beam of 6.76 m (22 ft 2 in), a height of 9.60 m (31 ft 6 in), and a draught of 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in). The submarine was powered by two MAN M 9 V 40/46 supercharged four-stroke, nine-cylinder diesel engines producing a total of 4,400 metric horsepower (3,240 kW; 4,340 shp) for use while surfaced, two Siemens-Schuckert 2 GU 345/34 double-acting electric motors producing a total of 1,000 metric horsepower (740 kW; 990 shp) for use while submerged. She had two shafts and two 1.92 m (6 ft) propellers. The boat was capable of operating at depths of up to 230 metres (750 ft).[5]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 18.2 knots (33.7 km/h; 20.9 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 7.3 knots (13.5 km/h; 8.4 mph).[5] When submerged, the boat could operate for 64 nautical miles (119 km; 74 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 12,000 nautical miles (22,000 km; 14,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph). U-105 was fitted with six 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (four fitted at the bow and two at the stern), 22 torpedoes, one 10.5 cm (4.13 in) SK C/32 naval gun, 180 rounds, and a 3.7 cm (1.5 in) SK C/30 as well as a 2 cm (0.79 in) C/30 anti-aircraft gun. The boat had a complement of forty-eight.[5]

Service history[edit]

Under the command of Kapitänleutnant Georg Schewe, U-105 left Kiel on 24 December 1940. She spent 39 days in the North Sea. During this patrol, she sank the British ship Bassano on 9 January 1941,[6] and Lurigethan, part of Convoy SL-61, on 26 January 1941, totalling 8,407 GRT. Five days later, on 31 January, U-105 arrived at the German-occupied port of Lorient, France,[7] which would remain her home port for the rest of her career.[2]

1941[edit]

U-105 left Lorient on her second patrol on 22 February 1941 and underwent a 112-day voyage in the Atlantic Ocean. Along with U-124, she was directed by the Oberkommando der Marine (Supreme naval headquarters), to attack Convoy SL-67.[8] During this attack, U-105 sank the merchant ship Harmodius,[9] on 8 March.[10] Collectively, the two U-boats sank a total of 28,148 tons.[8] U105 then stalked Convoy SL-68, sinking Medjerda [11] on 18 March,[12] Mandalika on 19 March [11] and Clan Ogilvy,[13] Benwyvis[14] and Jhelum, [15] all on the 21st. U-105 went on to score Nazi Germany's first kill off the coast of South America when she sank Ena de Larrinaga[16] on 5 April 1941.[17][18] Later during the patrol she sank Oakdene, part of Convoy OG-59. On 6 May,[17] Benvrackie,[14] part of Convoy OB-312; on the 13th,[14] Benvenue[14] part of Convoy OB-314 and on the 15th,[14] Rodney Star on 16 May and Scottish Monarch on 1 June [19][20] as part of Convoy OB-319. This was the second most successful U-boat patrol of the entire Second World War, with 12 ships sunk for a total of 71,450 GRT.[21] On 5 May 1941, the 105mm deck gun exploded, wounding six crew members. U-105 returned to Lorient on 13 June,[22] and remained there until 3 August, when she departed on her third war patrol.[23]

On 5 August she was assigned to wolfpack 'Hammer' and remained with it until it was disbanded on 12 August,[24] when she was reassigned to wolfpack 'Grönland', with which she remained until its disbanding on 27 August.[25] She was then assigned to wolfpack 'Margrave',[26] and sank the Panamanian merchant ship Montana, [27] part of Convoy SC-42, on 11 September.[28] She returned to Lorient nine days later.[23] U-105 left Lorient on her fourth patrol on 8 November 1941 and spent 36 days in the North Atlantic. On 14 November she was assigned to wolfpack 'Steuben' and remained with it until 2 December.[29] Having sunk no ships during the patrol, she returned to Lorient on 13 December 1941.[30] Georg Schewe left the boat shortly after this patrol, and was replaced as commander by Heinrich Schuch.[1]

1942[edit]

On 25 January 1942 U-105 left Lorient on her fifth patrol. On 31 January she sank the British warship HMS Culver, part of Convoy SL-98,[31] south-west of Ireland,[32] and, on 5 February 1942, she rescued seven men from a crashed German Dornier Do 24 350 miles off the coast of France. U-105 returned to Lorient on 8 February.[33] Seventeen days later, on 25 February, U-105 left Lorient. Between 25 and 27 March, she sank the British merchant ship Narragansett and the Norwegian merchant ship Svenør off the east coast of the United States. U-105 returned to Lorient on 15 April after spending 50 days in the North Atlantic,[34] and left on another patrol on 7 June. While crossing the Bay of Biscay, she was attacked by an Australian Short Sunderland aircraft from No. 10 Squadron RAAF. U-105 sought shelter in Ferrol, Spain[35] and did not leave until 28 June, when she departed for Lorient, which she reached on the 30th. The attack apparently caused serious damage, as she did not sail again until 23 November.[36] During this period, Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Adolf Schweichel was put in command of the boat, but did not undertake any patrols[37] and was replaced by Oberleutnant zur See Jürgen Nissen, under whose command U-105 left Lorient.[38]

While patrolling the North Atlantic she succeeded in sinking three British merchant ships; Orfor [39] on 14 December 1942, C.S. Flight on 12 January 1943, and British Vigilance, part of Convoy TM-1, on 24 January, as well as the American freighter[40] Cape Decision on the 27th.[38] U-105 returned to Lorient on 14 February,[38] and remained there until 16 March. During this patrol, (on 1 April), the boat's commander, Jürgen Nissen, was promoted to Kapitänleutnant.[41] On 15 May 1943 U-105 sank the Greek merchant ship Maroussio Logothetis [42] 250 miles southwest of Freetown.[43] On 2 June 1943, while passing close to Dakar, U-105 was attacked and sunk by a Potez-CAMS 141 flying boat "Antarés" from Free French Squadron 141. All 53 crew members were killed.[1][44][45]

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date Ship Nationality Tonnage[Note 1] Fate
9 January 1941 Bassano  United Kingdom 4,843 Sunk
26 January 1941 Lurigethan  United Kingdom 3,564 Sunk
8 March 1941 Harmodius  United Kingdom 5,229 Sunk
18 March 1941 Medjerda  United Kingdom 4,380 Sunk
19 March 1941 Mandalika  Netherlands 7,750 Sunk
21 March 1941 Benwyvis  United Kingdom 5,920 Sunk
21 March 1941 Clan Ogilvy  United Kingdom 5,802 Sunk
21 March 1941 Jhelum  United Kingdom 4,038 Sunk
5 April 1941 Ena de Larringa  United Kingdom 5,200 Sunk
6 May 1941 Oakdene  United Kingdom 4,255 Sunk
13 May 1941 Benyrackie  United Kingdom 6,434 Sunk
15 May 1941 Benvenue  United Kingdom 5,920 Sunk
16 May 1941 Rodney Star  United Kingdom 11,803 Sunk
1 June 1941 Scottish Monarch  United Kingdom 4,719 Sunk
11 September 1941 Montana  Panama 1,549 Sunk
31 January 1942 HMS Culver  Royal Navy 1,546 Sunk
25 March 1942 Narrangansett  United Kingdom 10,389 Sunk
27 March 1942 Svenør  Norway 7,616 Sunk
14 December 1942 Orfor  United Kingdom 6,578 Sunk
12 January 1943 C.S. Flight*  United Kingdom 67 Sunk
24 January 1943 British Vigilance  United Kingdom 8,093 Sunk
27 January 1943 Cape Decision  United States 5,106 Sunk
15 May 1943 Marusso Logothetis  Greece 4,669 Sunk

* Sailing vessel

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Merchant ship tonnages are in gross register tons. Military vessels are listed by tons displacement.

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Helgason, Guðmundur. "The Type IXB boat U-105". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  2. ^ a b c Helgason, Guðmundur. "War Patrols by U-105". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  3. ^ Kemp 1999, p. 123.
  4. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by U-105". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  5. ^ a b c d Gröner 1991, p. 68.
  6. ^ Jordan 2006, p. 487.
  7. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Patrol info for U-105 (First patrol)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  8. ^ a b Garzke and Dulin. Battleships: Axis and Neutral Battleships in World War II. p. 142. 
  9. ^ Rohwer 1999, p. 45.
  10. ^ Jordan 2006, p. 498.
  11. ^ a b Rohwer 1999, p. 46.
  12. ^ Jordan 2006, p. 504.
  13. ^ Jordan 2006, p. 493.
  14. ^ a b c d e Jordan 2006, p. 488.
  15. ^ Rohwer 1999, p. 47.
  16. ^ Rohwer 1999, p. 48.
  17. ^ a b Carey. Galloping Ghosts of the Brazilian Coast. p. 6. 
  18. ^ Jordan 2006, p. 496.
  19. ^ Rohwer 1999, p. 54.
  20. ^ Jordan 2006, p. 510.
  21. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Korvettenkapitän Georg Schewe". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 5 July 2011. 
  22. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-boat patrols: Patrol info for U-105 (Second patrol)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  23. ^ a b Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-boat patrols: Patrol info for U-105 (Third patrol)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  24. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Wolfpack Hammer". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 6 August 2011. 
  25. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Wolfpack Grönland". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 6 August 2011. 
  26. ^ Williamson 2005, p. 210.
  27. ^ Rohwer 1999, p. 65.
  28. ^ Jordan 2006, p. 449.
  29. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Wolfpack Steuben". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 6 August 2011. 
  30. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-boat patrols: Patrol info for U-105 (Fourth patrol)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 4 July 2011. 
  31. ^ Rohwer 1999, p. 76.
  32. ^ Geoffrey B. Mason. "HMS CULVER (Y 87) - ex-US Coast Guard Cutter". Service histories of Royal Navy warships in World War 2. Naval-history.net. Retrieved 5 August 2011. 
  33. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-boat patrols: Patrol info for U-105 (Fifth patrol)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 5 July 2011. 
  34. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-boat patrols: Patrol info for U-105 (Sixth patrol)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 5 July 2011. 
  35. ^ Lake. Sunderland Squadrons of World War 2. p. 32. 
  36. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-boat patrols: Patrol info for U-105 (Seventh patrol)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 5 July 2011. 
  37. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Oberleutnant zur See Hans-Adolf Schweichel". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 30 August 2011. 
  38. ^ a b c Helgason, Guðmundur. "U-boat patrols: Patrol info for U-105 (Eighth patrol)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 6 July 2011. 
  39. ^ Rohwer 1999, p. 141.
  40. ^ Dickson. World War Two Almanac. p. 158. 
  41. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Kapitänleutnant Jürgen Nissen". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 29 August 2011. 
  42. ^ Rohwer 1999, p. 167.
  43. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Maroussio Logothetis (Greek Steam merchant)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 6 July 2011. 
  44. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Patrol info for U-105 (Ninth patrol)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 6 July 2011. 
  45. ^ Blair 1998, p. 207.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Clay Blair (1998). Hitler's U-boat War: The Hunted, 1942-1945. Random House. ISBN 978-0-679-45742-8. 
  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). German U-boat commanders of World War II : a biographical dictionary. Translated by Brooks, Geoffrey. London, Annapolis, Md: Greenhill Books, Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-55750-186-6. 
  • Carey, Alan (2004). Galloping Ghosts of the Brazilian Coast: United States Naval Air Operations in the South Atlantic During World War II. iUniverse. ISBN 978-0-595-31527-7. 
  • Dickson, Keith (2008). World War Two almanac. ISBN 978-0-8160-6297-3. 
  • Garzke, William; Dulin, Robert (1985). Battleships: Axis and Neutral Battleships in World War II. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 0-87021-101-3. 
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4. 
  • Jordan, Roger (2006). The World's Merchant Fleets, 1939: The Particulars And Wartime Fates of 6,000 Ships. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-59114-959-2. 
  • Kemp, Paul (1999). U-Boats Destroyed - German Submarine Losses in the World Wars. London: Arms & Armour. ISBN 1-85409-515-3. 
  • Lake, Jon (2000). Sunderland Squadrons of World War 2. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1-84176-024-2. 
  • Geoffrey B. Mason. "HMS CULVER (Y 87) - ex-US Coast Guard Cutter". Service histories of Royal Navy warships in World War 2. Naval-history.net. 
  • Rohwer, Jürgen (1999). Axis submarine successes of World War Two: German, Italian, and Japanese submarine successes, 1939-1945. Naval Institute Press. ISBN 1-85367-340-4. 
  • Williamson, Gordon; Palmer, Ian (2002). Kriegsmarine U-boats, 1939-45 (2). Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1-84176-364-0. 
  • Williamson, Gordon (2005). Wolf Pack: The Story of the U-Boat in World War II. Osprey Publishing. ISBN 1-84176-872-3. 

External links[edit]

  • Helgason, Guðmundur. "The Type IXB boat U-105". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 3 July 2011. 
  • Hofmann, Markus. "U 105". Deutsche U-Boote 1935-1945 - u-boot-archiv.de (in German). Retrieved 30 January 2015.