German submarine U-1062

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History
Nazi Germany
Name: U-1062
Ordered: 25 August 1941
Builder: Germaniawerft, Kiel
Yard number: 696
Laid down: 12 August 1942
Launched: 8 May 1943
Commissioned: 19 June 1943
Fate: Sunk, 30 September 1944
General characteristics
Class and type: Type VIIF submarine
Displacement:
  • 1,084 tonnes (1,067 long tons) surfaced
  • 1,181 t (1,162 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 7.30 m (23 ft 11 in) o/a
  • 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Height: 9.60 m (31 ft 6 in)
Draught: 4.91 m (16 ft 1 in)
Installed power:
  • 2,800–3,200 PS (2,100–2,400 kW; 2,800–3,200 bhp) (diesels)
  • 750 PS (550 kW; 740 shp) (electric)
Propulsion:
Speed: 16.9–17.6 knots (31.3–32.6 km/h; 19.4–20.3 mph) surfaced
Range:
  • 14,700 nmi (27,200 km; 16,900 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
  • 75 nmi (139 km; 86 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth:
  • 200 m (660 ft)
  • Calculated crush depth: 220–240 m (720–790 ft)
Crew: 4 officers, 42 enlisted
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Commanders:
  • Oblt.z.S. Karl Albrecht
  • 19 June 1943 – 30 September 1944
Operations:
  • 1st patrol: 18 December 1943 – 19 April 1944
  • 2nd patrol: 15 July – 30 September 1944
Victories: None

German submarine U-1062 was one of a series of four Type VIIF submarine of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

Commissioned on 19 June 1943, U-1062 was one of four Type VIIF torpedo transport submarines, which could carry up to 40 torpedoes,[1] and were used to re-supply other U-boats at sea. U-1062 first served with 5th U-boat Flotilla for training and later served with 12th U-boat Flotilla from 1 January to 30 September 1944.

Design[edit]

As one of the six German Type VIID submarines, U-1062 had a displacement of 965 tonnes (950 long tons) when at the surface and 1,080 tonnes (1,060 long tons) while submerged.[2] She had a total length of 76.90 m (252 ft 4 in), a pressure hull length of 59.80 m (196 ft 2 in), a beam of 6.38 m (20 ft 11 in), a height of 9.70 m (31 ft 10 in), and a draught of 5.01 m (16 ft 5 in). The submarine was powered by two Germaniawerft F46 supercharged four-stroke, six-cylinder diesel engines producing a total of 2,800 to 3,200 metric horsepower (2,060 to 2,350 kW; 2,760 to 3,160 shp) for use while surfaced, two AEG GU 460/8-276 double-acting electric motors producing a total of 750 shaft horsepower (760 PS; 560 kW) for use while submerged. She had two shafts and two 1.23 m (4 ft) propellers. The boat was capable of operating at depths of up to 230 metres (750 ft).[2]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 16–16.7 knots (29.6–30.9 km/h; 18.4–19.2 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 7.3 knots (13.5 km/h; 8.4 mph).[2] When submerged, the boat could operate for 69 nautical miles (128 km; 79 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 11,200 nautical miles (20,700 km; 12,900 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph). U-1062 was fitted with five 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (four fitted at the bow and one at the stern), twelve torpedoes, one 8.8 cm (3.46 in) SK C/35 naval gun, 220 rounds, and an anti-aircraft gun. The boat had a complement of between forty-four.[2]

Service history[edit]

U-1062 left Kiel on 18 December 1943, arriving at Bergen on 24 December, where she remained until 3 January 1944, when she sailed for Penang, arriving on 19 April, loaded with spare torpedoes for the Monsun Gruppe. She left Penang on 15 July to return to Germany, but was intercepted on 30 September by a hunter-killer group based around the escort carrier USS Mission Bay (CVE-59) in the Central Atlantic, WSW of the Cape Verde Islands. U-1062 was sunk with all hands at 11°36′N 34°44′W / 11.600°N 34.733°W / 11.600; -34.733 by depth charges from the destroyer escort USS Fessenden.[3][4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gröner 1991, p. 104.
  2. ^ a b c d Gröner 1991, pp. 66–67.
  3. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "The Type VIIF boat U-1062". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2009-11-30. 
  4. ^ "USS Fessenden". www.history.navy.mil. Retrieved 2009-11-30. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Bishop, Chris (2006). Kriegsmarine U-Boats, 1939-45. London: Amber Books. ISBN 978-1-904687-96-2. 
  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945. Der U-Boot-Krieg (in German) IV (Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler). ISBN 3-8132-0514-2. 
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel (London: Conway Maritime Press). ISBN 0-85177-593-4. 

External links[edit]