German submarine U-84 (1941)

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For other ships with the same name, see German submarine U-84.
Type VIIB boat U-52
U-52, a typical Type VIIB boat
History
Nazi Germany
Name: U-84
Ordered: 9 June 1938
Builder: Flender Werke AG, Lübeck
Yard number: 280
Laid down: 9 November 1939
Launched: 26 February 1941
Commissioned: 29 April 1941
Fate: Sunk by US aircraft, 7 August 1943
General characteristics
Class and type: Type VIIB submarine
Displacement:
  • 753 tonnes (741 long tons) surfaced
  • 857 t (843 long tons) submerged
Length:
Beam:
  • 6.20 m (20 ft 4 in) o/a
  • 4.70 m (15 ft 5 in) pressure hull
Height: 9.50 m (31 ft 2 in)
Draught: 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in)
Installed power:
  • 2,800–3,200 PS (2,100–2,400 kW; 2,800–3,200 bhp) (diesels)
  • 750 PS (550 kW; 740 shp) (electric)
Propulsion:
Range:
  • 8,700 nmi (16,100 km; 10,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph) surfaced
  • 90 nmi (170 km; 100 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph) submerged
Test depth:
  • 220 m (720 ft)
  • Crush depth: 230–250 m (750–820 ft)
Complement: 4 officers, 40–56 enlisted
Sensors and
processing systems:
Gruppenhorchgerät
Armament:
Service record
Part of:
Commanders: Horst Uphoff
Operations: Eight
Victories: Six ships sunk; 29,905 GRT

German submarine U-84 was a Type VIIB U-boat of Nazi Germany's Kriegsmarine during World War II.

She was launched on 26 February 1941 and commissioned on 29 April 1941. She operated during the Battle of the Atlantic during the Second World War.

Design[edit]

German Type VIIB submarines were preceded by the shorter Type VIIA submarines. U-84 had a displacement of 753 tonnes (741 long tons) when at the surface and 857 tonnes (843 long tons) while submerged.[1] She had a total length of 66.50 m (218 ft 2 in), a pressure hull length of 48.80 m (160 ft 1 in), a beam of 6.20 m (20 ft 4 in), a height of 9.50 m (31 ft 2 in), and a draught of 4.74 m (15 ft 7 in). The submarine was powered by two Germaniawerft F46 four-stroke, six-cylinder supercharged diesel engines producing a total of 2,800 to 3,200 metric horsepower (2,060 to 2,350 kW; 2,760 to 3,160 shp) for use while surfaced, two AEG GU 460/8-276 double-acting electric motors producing a total of 750 metric horsepower (550 kW; 740 shp) for use while submerged. She had two shafts and two 1.23 m (4 ft) propellers. The boat was capable of operating at depths of up to 230 metres (750 ft).[1]

The submarine had a maximum surface speed of 17.9 knots (33.2 km/h; 20.6 mph) and a maximum submerged speed of 8 knots (15 km/h; 9.2 mph).[1] When submerged, the boat could operate for 90 nautical miles (170 km; 100 mi) at 4 knots (7.4 km/h; 4.6 mph); when surfaced, she could travel 8,700 nautical miles (16,100 km; 10,000 mi) at 10 knots (19 km/h; 12 mph). U-84 was fitted with five 53.3 cm (21 in) torpedo tubes (four fitted at the bow and one at the stern), fourteen torpedoes, one 8.8 cm (3.46 in) SK C/35 naval gun, 220 rounds, and one 2 cm (0.79 in) anti-aircraft gun The boat had a complement of between forty-four and sixty.[1]

Service history[edit]

U-84 carried out eight patrols and accounted for six ships sunk and one ship damaged during World War II. She operated in the Gulf of Mexico for a time. Commanded by Captain Uphoff, U-84 torpedoed the freighter Baja California just forward of midships whilst in the Gulf of Mexico on 19 July 1942 at 06:45. Baja California sank in about 114 feet (35 m) of water about 60 to 70 nautical miles (110 to 130 km; 69 to 81 mi) southwest of Fort Myers, Florida. Baja California, en route from New Orleans, Louisiana to Key West, was carrying a load of general cargo which included glassware.[2]

Fate[edit]

U-84 was sunk while under the command of Horst Uphoff on 7 August 1943 in the North Atlantic, in position 27°55′N 68°03′W / 27.917°N 68.050°W / 27.917; -68.050Coordinates: 27°55′N 68°03′W / 27.917°N 68.050°W / 27.917; -68.050 by a Mk 24 homing torpedo dropped on it by a US B24 Liberator aircraft (VB-105/B-4 USN). 46 dead (all hands lost).[3]

Wolfpacks[edit]

U-84 took part in seventeen wolfpacks, namely.

  • Grönland (16–27 August 1941)
  • Markgraf (27 August – 13 September 1941)
  • Schlagetot (20 October – 1 November 1941)
  • Raubritter (1–4 November 1941)
  • Seydlitz (27 December 1941 – 13 January 1942)
  • Ziethen (13–22 January 1942)
  • Endrass (12–17 June 1942)
  • Panther (6–20 October 1942)
  • Veilchen (20 October – 5 November 1942)
  • Kreuzotter (9–19 November 1942)
  • Sturmbock (21–26 February 1943)
  • Wildfang (26 February – 5 March 1943)
  • Raubgraf (7–20 March 1943)
  • Seewolf (24–30 March 1943)
  • Adler (7–13 April 1943)
  • Meise (13–20 April 1943)
  • Specht (21–25 April 1943)

Summary of raiding history[edit]

Date[4] Name of ship Nationality Tonnage (GRT) Fate
8 April 1942 Nemanja  Yugoslavia 5,226 Sunk
21 April 1942 Chenango  Panama 3,014 Sunk
23 June 1942 Torvanger  Norway 6,568 Sunk
13 July 1942 Andrew Jackson  United States 5,990 Sunk
19 July 1942 Baja California  Honduras 1,648 Sunk
21 July 1942 William Cullen Bryant  United States 7,176 Damaged
2 November 1942 Empire Sunrise  United Kingdom 7,459 Sunk

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Gröner 1991, pp. 43–44.
  2. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Baja California (Steam merchant)". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  3. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "The Type VIIB boat U-84". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 
  4. ^ Helgason, Guðmundur. "Ships hit by U-84". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2010-01-08. 

Bibliography[edit]

  • Busch, Rainer; Röll, Hans-Joachim (1999). Deutsche U-Boot-Verluste von September 1939 bis Mai 1945. Der U-Boot-Krieg (in German). IV. Hamburg, Berlin, Bonn: Mittler. ISBN 3-8132-0514-2. 
  • Gröner, Erich; Jung, Dieter; Maass, Martin (1991). U-boats and Mine Warfare Vessels. German Warships 1815–1945. 2. Translated by Thomas, Keith; Magowan, Rachel. London: Conway Maritime Press. ISBN 0-85177-593-4. 

External links[edit]

  • Helgason, Guðmundur. "The Type VIIB boat U-84". German U-boats of WWII - uboat.net. Retrieved 2 February 2015. 
  • Hofmann, Markus. "U 84". Deutsche U-Boote 1935-1945 - u-boot-archiv.de (in German). Retrieved 2 February 2015.