Common Germanic deities

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The article lists gods and goddesses (Ansewez, Wanizaz) that may be reconstructed for Proto-Germanic or Common Germanic Migration period paganism, or which figure in both West and North Germanic mythology. See list of Germanic deities for a complete list of Germanic gods and goddesses, including those for whom there is insufficient attestation to produce Common Germanic reconstructions.[citation needed]

Deities[edit]

Goddesses
  • Fraujō, daughter of Njǫrðr, Norse Freyja, Old High German Frouwa, Old English frēo meaning "lady", cf. Gothic Fráujo "lady, mistress", German "Frau", Dutch "Vrouw", Swedish, Danish and Norwegian "Fru".
  • Fullō, goddess—or *Fullaz, god—of riches, plenty. Corresponds to Norse Fulla.
  • Wurdiz, "fate", Norse Urðr (Urd, Urth), Old English Wyrd.
  • Sōwilō, the Sun, Norse Sól, Old English Sunne, Old High German Sunna.
Gods
  • Wōdanaz, "lord of poetic/mantic inspiration", "Germanic Mercury", Norse Óðinn (often Anglicized Odin or, especially in older texts, Othin), Old English Wōden, Old High German Wuotan.
  • Þunraz, "thunder", "Germanic Jupiter", Norse Þórr (Thor), West Germanic Donar, Old English Þunor.
  • Teiwaz, god of war and possibly early sky god, "Germanic Mars", Norse Týr and possibly Tir, Old English Tiw, Old High German Ziu, continues Indo-European Dyeus.
  • Ermunaz, Saxon god (speculative, based on Nennius' Armenon). The word means "strong" or "exalted" (Old High German ermen, Old Norse jǫrmaun or jörmun, Old English Eormen).
  • Wulþuz, "glorious one", possibly originally an epitheton, mentioned on the Thorsberg chape, continued in Norse Ullr.
  • Ingwaz or Inguz, identified with the god addressed as fraujaz "lord" (Old High German frô, Gothic frauja, Old English frēa, Old Norse freyr)

Semi-gods or mythical heroes[edit]

Mythical races[edit]

Cosmology[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ see Hellmut Rosenfeld, Der Name Wieland, Beiträge zur Namenforschung (1969).