Gertrude Fehr

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Photo of Gertrude Fehr taken by Erling Mandelmann.
Photo of Gertrude Fehr taken by Erling Mandelmann.

Gertrude Fehr (1895 – 1996) was a German photographer.[1][2]

She studied photography in the workshop of Edward Wasow, and at the Bavarian School.[1]

After her apprenticeship with Wasow she established a photography studio dedicated mainly to portraits and the theater.[1] Hitler's rise to power forced her to go to Paris, and while there with her husband she opened PUBLI-phot, a school of photography.[1] In Paris she began to use solarisation for her photographs.[1]

When war began in Paris, she had to go to Switzerland, where she created the photography school of Fehr.[1]

After the war, she went to Vevey, where she worked as a photography teacher for fifteen years; one of her students was Jeanloup Sieff.[1]

Beginning in the 1960s she devoted herself to doing portraits as a freelance photographer.[1] Some of her work is held in the National Gallery of Canada, and some is held in the Musée de l’Elysée.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h TheBiography.us. "Biography of Gertrude Fehr (1895-1996)". TheBiography.us. Retrieved 2016-06-22.
  2. ^ a b Gertrude Fehr. "Gertrude Fehr - National Gallery of Canada | National Gallery of Canada". Gallery.ca. Retrieved 2016-06-22.
  3. ^ "Musée de l'Elysée: Photographic Archives". Elysee.ch. Retrieved 2016-06-22.