Ghanzi District

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Ghanzi
Gantsi
District
Location within Botswana
Location within Botswana
Coordinates: 22°00′S 22°00′E / 22.000°S 22.000°E / -22.000; 22.000Coordinates: 22°00′S 22°00′E / 22.000°S 22.000°E / -22.000; 22.000
Country  Botswana
Capital Ghanzi
Area
 • Total 117,910 km2 (45,530 sq mi)
Population (2011 census)
 • Total 43,370
 • Density 0.37/km2 (0.95/sq mi)
Time zone Central Africa Time (UTC+2)

Ghanzi (sometimes Gantsi) is a district in western Botswana, bordering Namibia in the west and extending east into much of the interior of the country. The district's administrative centre is the town of Ghanzi. Most of the eastern half of Ghanzi makes up the Central Kalahari Game Reserve. The human population at the 2001 census was 43,370, less populous than that of any other district in Botswana. Ghanzi's area is 117,910 km².

Location[edit]

In the west, Ghanzi borders the Omaheke Region of Namibia. Domestically, it borders the following districts:

Ghanzi is traversed by the northwesterly line of equal latitude and longitude.

Sub-districts[edit]

Sub-districts of Ghanzi District include:

Settlements[edit]

The largest village in the district is the capital Ghanzi with a population of 9,934 according to the 2001 census, which is five times more than the second-largest village Ncojane has. The following is the list of the villages in Ghanzi district listed separately in 2001 census:[1]

Bere, Charles Hill, Chobokwane, Dekar, East Hanahai, Ghanzi, Groote Laagte, Kacgae, Karakobis, Kule, Makunda, Ncojane, New Xade, New Xanagas, Qabo, Tsootsha, West Hanahai

Natural features[edit]

This region is largely covered by the Kalahari Desert, some of which is also covered by the Makgadikgadi Pans, a large seasonal wetland. The Makgadigadi was one of the Earth's largest lakes during the Pleistocene, but currently provides a vast summer wetland to support tens of thousands of migrating flamingos in the rainy summer season.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Distribution of population by sex by villages and their associated localities: 2001 population and housing census". Archived from the original on 2007-11-24. Retrieved 2007-12-11. 
  2. ^ C. Michael Hogan (2008) Makgadikgadi, The Megalithic Portal, ed. A. Burnham [1]