Ghayath Almadhoun

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Ghayath Almadhoun
GhayathAlmadhounNew.jpg
Ghayath Almadhoun (2015)
Born (1979-07-19) 19 July 1979 (age 39)
Damascus, Syria
OccupationPoet, playwright
Websitehttp://www.ghayathalmadhoun.com/

Ghayath Almadhoun (Arabic: غياث المدهون) born 19 July 1979 is a Swedish/Palestinian poet, playwright, journalist and literary critic.

Career[edit]

Ghayath Almadhoun was born in Damascus, Syria. He now lives in Stockholm. He founded Bayt al-Qasid, the House of Poetry, a space for freewheeling expression in Damascus, together with the Syrian poet Lukman Derky. He has published 3 collections of poetry, the latest was published in Beirut 2014. He has been translated and published in two collections in Swedish, Asylansökan, 2010, published by Ersatz and was awarded "Klas de Vylders stipendiefond" for immigrant writers. The latest "Till Damaskus" published by Albert Bonniers Förlag, he wrote together with the Swedish poet Marie Silkeberg.[1] The book was at Dagens Nyheters literary critic list for Best new books[2] and was also converted to a radio play at Swedish National Radio.[3] With Marie Silkeberg he also have made several poetry films. His work has been translated into Swedish, German, Dutch, Greek, Slovenian, Italian, English, French, Danish and Chinese. The Dutch translation of his poems "Weg van Damascus" was one of the top 10 selling poetry books in Belgium for several weeks in 2015.[4]

Publications[edit]

  • لا أستطيع الحضور, Arab Institute for Research and Publishing in Beirut and Amman 2014
  • Weg van Damascus, Uitgeverij Jurgen Maas 2014
  • Till Damaskus, Albert Bonniers förlag 2014
  • Asylansökan, Ersatz förlag 2010
  • Qulama itasaat al Medina daqat ghorfati, Damascus as Cultural Capital for Arabic Culture 2008
  • Qasaed sakatat sahwan, Arabic Writers Union i Damaskus 2004

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ghayath Almadhoun on Albert Bonnier förlag".
  2. ^ "Review in Dagens Nyheter".
  3. ^ "Ghayath Almadhoun on Sveriges Radio".
  4. ^ "Arablit.org".

External links[edit]