Gherardi Davis

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Gherardi Davis (1900)

Gherardi Davis (October 15, 1858 – March 9, 1941) was an American lawyer, book author and politician from New York.

Life[edit]

He was born on October 15, 1858[1] in San Francisco, California, the son of George Henry Davis (1824–1897) and Clara Jane (Gherardi) Davis (1827–1897). In 1868, the family went to Europe, and Gherardi attended school in Germany and college in France. In 1879, he returned to the United States, and studied law, first in Washington, D.C., and then in New York City. He was admitted to the bar, and practiced law in New York City.[2] On April 7, 1894, he married Alice King (1860–1920), daughter of State Senator John A. King. Gherardi and Alice Davis published several works on military standards.

Davis was a member of the New York State Assembly (New York Co., 27th D.) in 1899, 1900, 1901 and 1902; and was Chairman of the Committee on Public Lands and Forestry in 1902.

On March 20, 1903, he was appointed as Third Deputy New York City Police Commissioner.[3]

In 1910, he became interested in sailing boats. He competed in regattas with his yacht Alice, and won many prizes.[4]

He died on March 9, 1941, in the Harkness Pavilion of the Columbia–Presbyterian Medical Center in Manhattan.[5]

Governor of Massachusetts John Davis (1787–1854) was his grandfather; Rear Admiral Bancroft Gherardi (1832–1903) was his uncle; and electrical engineer Bancroft Gherardi, Jr. (1873–1941) was his first cousin.

Works[edit]

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ The Saint Nicholas Society of the City of New York (1916; pg. 17)
  2. ^ New York Red Book (1900; pg. 113)
  3. ^ NEW DEPUTY FOR GREENE in the New York Times on March 21, 1903
  4. ^ LARCHMONT YACHT WINS FIRST HONORS in the New York Times on August 22, 1913
  5. ^ GHERARDI DAVIS, 83, LAWYER, CIVIC AIDE in the New York Times on March 10, 1941 (subscription required)
New York Assembly
Preceded by
Francis E. Laimbeer
New York State Assembly
New York County, 27th District

1899–1902
Succeeded by
George B. Agnew