List of extinct Uto-Aztecan languages

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Giamina language)
Jump to: navigation, search

A large number of languages known only from brief mentions are thought to have been Uto-Aztecan languages, but became extinct without being documented. The following list is based on Campbell (1997):133–135.

  • San Nicolás (Nicoleño): spoken in California, thought to be a Takic language.
  • Giamina/Omomil:[1] Kroeber (1907) and Lamb (1964) believe Giamina may constitute a separate branch of Northern Uto-Aztecan, although Miller (1983) is uncertain about this. It was spoken in Southern California.
  • Vanyume: a Takic language of California
  • Acaxee (Aiage): closely related to Tahue, a Cahitan language, linked with Tebaca and Sabaibo.
  • Amotomanco (Otomoaco):[2] uncertain classification, possibly Uto-Aztecan. (See Troike (1988) for more details.)
  • Cazcan (Caxcan): sometimes considered to be the same as Zacateca, although Miller (1983) would only consider these to be geographical classifications.
  • Baciroa: closely connected to Tepahue
  • Basopa
  • Batuc: possibly an Opata dialect
  • Cahuimeto
  • Cahuameto: probably belongs with Oguera and Nio
  • Chínipa: may be a Tarahumaran language close to Ocoroni, since colonial sources claim the two are mutually intelligible. It may also instead be a local name for a variety of Guarijío.
  • Coca: spoken near Lake Chapala.
  • Colotlan: a Pimic language closely related to Tepehuan, or Teul and Tepecano
  • Comanito: a Taracahitic language closely related to Tahue
  • Concho:[3] probably a Taracahitic language (Troike 1988). Subdivisions include Chinarra and Chizo; Toboso is possibly related to Concho as well.
  • Conicari: a Taracahitic language closely related to Tahue
  • Guachichil: possibly a variant or close relative of Huichol
  • Guasave: possibly a Taracahitic language, or may instead be non-Uto-Aztecan language possibly related to Seri due to the speakers' maritime economy (Miller 1983). Dialects include Compopori, Ahome, Vacoregue, and Achire.
  • Guazapar (Guasapar): probably a Tarahumara dialect, or it may be more closely related to Guarijío and Chínipa. Guazapar, Jova, Pachera, and Juhine may possibly all be dialects of Tarahumara.
  • Guisca (Coisa)
  • Hio: possibly a Taracahitic language
  • Huite: closely related to Ocoroni, and may be Taracahitic
  • Irritila: a Lagunero band
  • Jova (Jobal, Ova):[4] most often linked with Opata, although some scholars classify it as a Tarahumara dialect. Miller (1983) considers it to be "probably Taracahitan."
  • Jumano;[5] also Humano, Jumana, Xumana, Chouman (from a French source), Zumana, Zuma, Suma, and Yuma. Suma is probably the same language, while Jumano is possibly Uto-Aztecan.
  • Lagunero: may be the same as Irritila, and may also be closely related to Zacateco or Huichol.
  • Macoyahui: probably related to Cahita.
  • Mocorito: a Tahue language, which is Taracahitic.
  • Naarinuquia (Themurete?): Uto-Aztecan affiliation is likely, although it may instead be non-Uto-Aztecan language possibly related to Seri due to the speakers' maritime economy.[6]
  • Nacosura: an Opata dialect
  • Nio: completely undocumented, although it is perhaps related to Ocoroni.
  • Ocoroni: most likely a Taracahitic language, and is reported to be mutually intelligible with Chínipa, and similar to Opata. Related languages may include Huite and Nio.
  • Oguera (Ohuera)
  • Patarabuey: unknown affiliation (Purépecha region near Lake Chapala), and is possibly a Nahuatl dialect.
  • Tahue: may also include Comanito, Mocorito, Tubar, and Zoe. It is possibly a Taracahitic language, and is definitely not Nahuan.
  • Tanpachoa:[7] unknown affiliation, [8] and was once spoken along the Río Grande.
  • Tecuexe: speakers were possibly part of a "Mexicano" (Nahua) colony.
  • Teco-Tecoxquin: an Aztecan language
  • Tecual: closely related to Huichol. According to Sauer (1934:14), the "Xamaca, by another name called Hueitzolme [Huichol], all ... speak the Thequalme language, though they differ in vowels."
  • Témori: may be a Tarahumara dialect.
  • Tepahue: possibly a Taracahitic language. Closely related languages or dialects include Macoyahui, Conicari, and Baciroa.
  • Tepanec: an Aztecan language.
  • Teul (Teul-Chichimeca): a Pimic language, possibly of the Tepecano subgroup.
  • Toboso: grouped with Concho.
  • Topia: perhaps the same as Xixime (Jijime).
  • Topiame: possibly a Taracahitic language.
  • Totorame: grouped with Cora.
  • Xixime (Jijime): possibly a Taracahitic language. Subdivisions are Hine and Hume. Its links with Acaxee are uncertain.
  • Zacateco: often considered the same as Acaxee, although this is uncertain. It is possibly related to Huichol, although Miller (1983) leaves it as unclassified.
  • Zoe: possibly a Taracahitic language, with Baimena as a subdivision. It is possibly affiliated with Comanito.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Omomil". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  2. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Amotomanco". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  3. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Concho". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  4. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Jova". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  5. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Jumano". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  6. ^ Miller 1983.
  7. ^ Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin; Bank, Sebastian, eds. (2016). "Tanpachoa". Glottolog 2.7. Jena: Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History. 
  8. ^ Troike 1988.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Miller, Wick R. (1983). "Uto-Aztecan languages". In Ortiz, Alfonso. Handbook of North American Indians. 10. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution. pp. 113–124. 
  • Campbell, Lyle (1997). American Indian Languages: The Historical Linguistics of Native America. Oxford Studies in Anthropological Linguistics, 4. London and New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-509427-1. OCLC 32923907. 
  • Troike, Rudolf C. (1988). "Amotomanco (Otomoaca) and Tanpachoa as Uto-Aztecan languages". International Journal of American Linguistics. 54: 235–241. doi:10.1086/466084.