Gibson County, Tennessee

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Gibson County
Gibson County Courthouse in Trenton
Gibson County Courthouse in Trenton
Map of Tennessee highlighting Gibson County
Location within the U.S. state of Tennessee
Map of the United States highlighting Tennessee
Tennessee's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 36°00′N 88°56′W / 36°N 88.93°W / 36; -88.93
Country United States
State Tennessee
Founded1823
Named forJohn H. Gibson
SeatTrenton
Largest cityHumboldt
Area
 • Total604 sq mi (1,560 km2)
 • Land603 sq mi (1,560 km2)
 • Water0.9 sq mi (2 km2)  0.2%%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total49,045 Increase
 • Density82/sq mi (32/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district8th

Gibson County is a county located in the U.S. state of Tennessee. As of the 2010 census, the population was 49,683.[1] Its county seat is Trenton.[2] The county was formed in 1823 and named for John H. Gibson, a soldier of the Natchez Expedition and the Creek War.[3]

History[edit]

Gibson County
Sheriff's Department
Jurisdictional structure
Operations jurisdictionGibson, Tennessee, United States
Size604 sq mi
Legal jurisdictionAs per operations jurisdiction
General nature
Operational structure
Agency executive
  • Paul Thomas, Sheriff
Facilities
Stations1
Jails1

Gibson County is located in what was known as "Indian Land": territory that was legally occupied by Chickasaw Native American people. The Chickasaw Cession, proclaimed on January 7, 1819, eliminated those rights and opened the region to settlement and exploitation by white settlers and speculators.[4]

Soon after the Chickasaw Cession, the first log cabin in what was to become Gibson County had been built by Thomas Fite about eight miles (13 km) east of present-day Trenton. From 1819 the area was part of Carroll County but, as settlement progressed, citizens petitioned for the formation of a new county. The county was established by private act on October 21, 1823, and was named in honor of Colonel John H. Gibson[5] who had died earlier that year. Gibson was a native of Bedford County, Tennessee who was commissioned Lieutenant in the Tennessee Militia; he took part in the War of 1812, the campaign to Natchez of 1813, and fought in the Creek Wars of 1813.[6]

In its early years, Gibson County grew rapidly, chiefly because the land had less dense forest growth than some adjacent areas and was therefore more easily prepared to farm cotton and corn. By the end of 1824, the county had 273,143 acres (1,105.37 km2) of taxable land. The county's first cotton gin was built in 1826.[7]

Geography[edit]

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 604 square miles (1,560 km2), of which 603 square miles (1,560 km2) is land and 0.9 square miles (2.3 km2) (0.2%) is water.[8]

Adjacent counties[edit]

State protected areas[edit]

  • Horns Bluff Refuge (part)
  • Maness Swamp Refuge
  • Obion River Wildlife Management Area (part)
  • Tigrett Wildlife Management Area (part)

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
18305,801
184013,689136.0%
185019,54842.8%
186021,77711.4%
187025,66617.9%
188032,68527.3%
189033,8593.6%
190039,40816.4%
191041,6305.6%
192043,3884.2%
193046,5287.2%
194044,835−3.6%
195048,1327.4%
196044,699−7.1%
197047,8717.1%
198049,4673.3%
199046,315−6.4%
200048,1524.0%
201049,6833.2%
2018 (est.)49,045[9]−1.3%
U.S. Decennial Census[10]
1790–1960[11] 1900–1990[12]
1990–2000[13] 2010–2014[1]
Age pyramid Gibson County[14]

2020 census[edit]

Gibson County racial composition[15]
Race Num. Perc.
White (non-Hispanic) 37,930 75.21%
Black or African American (non-Hispanic) 8,929 17.71%
Native American 97 0.19%
Asian 200 0.4%
Pacific Islander 15 0.03%
Other/Mixed 1,819 3.61%
Hispanic or Latino 1,439 2.85%

As of the 2020 United States census, there were 50,429 people, 19,320 households, and 12,987 families residing in the county.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[16] of 2000, there were 48,152 people, 19,518 households, and 13,584 families residing in the county. The population density was 80 people per square mile (31/km2). There were 21,059 housing units at an average density of 35 per square mile (13/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 78.66% White, 19.72% Black or African American, 0.20% Native American, 0.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 0.76% from two or more races. 1.12% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 19,518 households, out of which 30.20% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.20% were married couples living together, 13.60% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.40% were non-families. 27.40% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 2.93.

In the county, the population was spread out, with 24.00% under the age of 18, 8.10% from 18 to 24, 26.90% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 17.70% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 89.50 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $31,105, and the median income for a family was $39,318. Males had a median income of $30,360 versus $21,351 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,320. About 9.40% of families and 12.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.00% of those under age 18 and 15.30% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation[edit]

Airports[edit]

There are two airports located in Gibson County:

Court System[edit]

Trenton is the county seat. However, since just after the Civil War, Gibson County's court system has been geographically divided, with both Trenton and Humboldt serving as venues for the county's civil and criminal cases.

Education[edit]

Gibson County has five special school districts: Bradford, Gibson County, Humboldt, Milan and Trenton. Each district has its own school board and director of schools. There are six high schools in the county.

High schools[edit]

School Location Mascot Colors
Bradford High School Bradford Red Devils    
Gibson County High School Dyer Pioneers      
Humboldt High School Humboldt Vikings    
Milan High School Milan Bulldogs    
Peabody High School Trenton Golden Tide    
South Gibson County High School Medina Hornets      

Media[edit]

Radio stations[edit]

  • Victory 93.7 - The Victory 93.7 FM—WTKB ATWOOD-MILAN
  • WJPJ AM 1190 & 99.9 "WJPJ Fox Sports Jackson 1190AM/99.9FM"

Newspapers[edit]

  • Tennessee Magnet Publications (free monthly), based in Huntingdon, but circulates in Gibson and Dyer counties
  • The Tri-City Reporter, Dyer
  • The Gazette, Trenton
  • The Chronicle, Humboldt
  • The Mirror-Exchange, Milan

Events[edit]

The Gibson County Fair is held each August in Trenton. The fair is billed as the "oldest continuously running fair in the South."[19] The fair was first held in 1856 and has been held annually since 1869.[19]

The West Tennessee Strawberry Festival had been held annually during the first full week of May in Humboldt since 1934. The festival has drawn up to 100,000 people from across the area.[20] Popular festival events include Thursday's traditional Jr. Parade, which is one of the world's largest non-motorized parades,[21] Friday's Grand Floats Parade, the Horse Show, Governor's Luncheon, Carnival, Prayer Breakfast, Car Show, 5K and 10K Runs, and Festival Beauty Reviews.

Communities[edit]

Cities[edit]

Towns[edit]

Unincorporated communities[edit]

Politics[edit]

Gibson County has voted for the Republican in the last five presidential elections. The last Democrat to carry this county was Al Gore in 2000.

United States presidential election results for Gibson County, Tennessee[22]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 16,259 72.80% 5,771 25.84% 305 1.37%
2016 13,786 70.53% 5,258 26.90% 503 2.57%
2012 12,883 65.51% 6,564 33.38% 220 1.12%
2008 13,516 63.60% 7,406 34.85% 331 1.56%
2004 10,596 55.13% 8,511 44.28% 114 0.59%
2000 8,286 48.35% 8,663 50.55% 188 1.10%
1996 6,614 40.26% 8,851 53.88% 963 5.86%
1992 7,161 39.06% 9,555 52.12% 1,616 8.82%
1988 8,415 52.47% 7,542 47.03% 81 0.51%
1984 9,484 52.71% 8,334 46.32% 174 0.97%
1980 6,792 40.13% 9,829 58.08% 302 1.78%
1976 5,563 34.70% 10,356 64.60% 112 0.70%
1972 9,900 71.05% 3,625 26.02% 409 2.94%
1968 4,093 26.77% 3,962 25.92% 7,233 47.31%
1964 4,614 36.24% 8,119 63.76% 0 0.00%
1960 5,173 45.66% 5,796 51.16% 360 3.18%
1956 3,481 29.72% 7,884 67.31% 348 2.97%
1952 3,766 35.90% 6,687 63.74% 38 0.36%
1948 1,137 19.04% 3,917 65.60% 917 15.36%
1944 1,568 25.24% 4,632 74.57% 12 0.19%
1940 1,233 19.40% 5,103 80.29% 20 0.31%
1936 958 16.72% 4,744 82.79% 28 0.49%
1932 704 14.96% 3,972 84.42% 29 0.62%
1928 1,365 31.95% 2,898 67.84% 9 0.21%
1924 1,037 24.05% 3,235 75.04% 39 0.90%
1920 3,209 34.99% 5,942 64.80% 19 0.21%
1916 1,443 28.44% 3,609 71.13% 22 0.43%
1912 1,002 23.71% 2,671 63.20% 553 13.09%


Notable natives[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Specific
  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved November 30, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  3. ^ Fred Culp, "Gibson County," Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Retrieved: June 28, 2013.
  4. ^ "TNGenWeb: Text of the Chickasaw Cession". Retrieved December 8, 2010.
  5. ^ "Tennessee State Archives: Formation of Gibson County". Archived from the original on May 29, 2010. Retrieved December 8, 2010.
  6. ^ "TNroots: Gibson County Genealogy: John H. Gibson". Retrieved December 8, 2010.
  7. ^ "TNGenWeb: Goodspeed's History of Tennessee". Archived from the original on December 6, 2010. Retrieved December 8, 2010.
  8. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  9. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved July 20, 2019.
  10. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  11. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  12. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  13. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  14. ^ Based on 2000 census data
  15. ^ "Explore Census Data". data.census.gov. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  16. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  17. ^ "FAA information: Humboldt City Airport". Retrieved December 1, 2010.
  18. ^ "FAA information: Gibson County Airport". Retrieved December 1, 2010.
  19. ^ a b History of the Gibson County Fair Archived July 24, 2010, at the Wayback Machine, The Gibson County Fair Association, accessed September 28, 2008
  20. ^ History, West Tennessee Strawberry Festival website, 2013. Retrieved: June 28, 2013.
  21. ^ Parks and Recreation Archived October 10, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, Humboldt Chamber of Commerce website. Retrieved: June 28, 2013.
  22. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved March 10, 2018.
General

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 36°00′N 88°56′W / 36.00°N 88.93°W / 36.00; -88.93