Giovanni di Stefano (sculptor)

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Giovanni di Stefano (1443 – c. 1506) was an Italian bronze-caster, engineer, and sculptor. Baptized 20 June 1443, he was the son of Stefano di Giovanni.[1]

Some of his surviving works include two angels in bronze at Siena Cathedral, which he created in 1489 in collaboration with Francesco di Giorgio (who also worked with Giacomo Cozzarelli on another pair of bronze angels in the same cathedral), the marble altar of St. Caterina's chapel in S. Domenico, Siena (1469), and the effigy of Cardinal Pietro Foscari in the church of Santa Maria del Popolo in Rome (previously thought to have been created by Vecchietta), which he created circa 1485.[2][3][4][5][6] The latter is now preserved in the Costa Chapel.

Some scholars believe the bas relief of St. John the Evangelist in Siena Cathedral to also be the work of di Stefano, but the evidence for this is disputed.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jane Turner (1996). The Dictionary of Art. Grove. p. 717.
  2. ^ "Giacomo Cozzarelli". The Concise Grove Dictionary of Art. Oxford University Press, Inc. 2002.
  3. ^ Paul Schubring (1903). Urbano da Cortona. Ein Beitrag zur Kenntnis der Schule Donatellos und der Sieneser Plastik im Quattrocento (in German). Strassburg: Heitz und Mündel. p. 59. ISBN 0-543-94054-3.
  4. ^ M. Kuhlenthal (1982). "Des Grabmal Pietro Foscaris in S. Maria del Popolo in Rom: Ein Werk des Giovanni di Stefano". Mitteilungen des Kunsthistorischen Institutes in Florenz (in German). XXVI: 47–62.
  5. ^ L. Bellosi, ed. (1993). Francesco di Giorgio e il Rinascimento a Siena, 1450-1500. Milan. pp. 198–199, 390–391.
  6. ^ Munman, Robert (1993). Sienese Renaissance Tomb Monuments. Philadelphia. pp. 89–106, 118–119, 130–131.
  7. ^ Hellmut Wohl (June 1991). "Review of "Donatello Studien (Italienische Forschengen)"". The Art Bulletin. The Art Bulletin, Vol. 73, No. 2. 73 (2): 315–323. doi:10.2307/3045797. JSTOR 3045797.

Further reading[edit]

  • "Giovanni di Stefano". The Concise Grove Dictionary of Art. Oxford University Press, Inc. 2002.

External links[edit]