Tour of the Alps

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Giro del Trentino
Giro del Trentino logo.svg
Race details
Date Mid-to-Late April
Region Tyrol–South Tyrol–Trentino, Austria and Italy
English name Tour of Trentino
Local name(s) Giro del Trentino (in Italian)
Discipline Road
Competition UCI Europe Tour
Type Stage race
History
First edition 1962 (1962)
Editions 42 (as of 2018)
First winner  Enzo Moser (ITA)
Most wins  Damiano Cunego (ITA) (3 wins)
Most recent  Thibaut Pinot (FRA)

The Tour of the Alps is an annual professional cycling stage race in Italy and Austria. First held in 1962, it was named Giro del Trentino (English: Tour of Trentino) until 2016, and run over four stages in the Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol region of Italy. In 2015, the race merged with the nearby one-day race Trofeo Melinda, and the 2015 edition was called the Giro del Trentino Melinda.[1]

In 2017, the event was renamed Tour of the Alps,[2] as it addresses the entire Euroregion of Tyrol–South Tyrol–Trentino, formed by three different regional authorities in two countries: the Austrian state of Tyrol and the Italian autonomous provinces of South Tyrol and Trentino. It should not be confused with the similarly named Giro al Sas di Trento, an annual road running competition in the city of Trento.[3]

Since its rebranding, the race is run mid-to-late April over five stages, as a 2.HC event of the UCI Europe Tour, the level beneath the UCI World Tour. The Tour of the Alps, typically featuring short and mountainous stages, is considered a last preparation race for the key contenders of the Giro d'Italia, which starts two weeks after the Tour of the Alps finishes. Ten winners of the Giro del Trentino have also won the Giro d'Italia, all of them Italians: Francesco Moser, Giuseppe Saronni, Franco Chioccioli, Gianni Bugno, Gilberto Simoni, Paolo Savoldelli, Damiano Cunego, Vincenzo Nibali, Ivan Basso and Michele Scarponi. Damiano Cunego holds the race record with three overall wins.[4]

History[edit]

The first edition of the race was held in 1962. It consisted of a single stage that started and finished in Trento. It was won by Enzo Moser. After a second edition in 1963, the third edition was not held until 1979. There were two unofficial races, in 1977 and 1978 but they remain disputed and usually not treated as official Giro del Trentino races.[5] The 1986 edition of the race was unusual in that there was no individual prize awarded. It was instead a team competition called the Coppa Italia and the first place went to Carrera–Inoxpran. One of the stages of the 1995 Giro del Trentino went to Innsbruck in neighbouring Austria, and stages to and from Lienz in Austria have remained a regular feature of the race since that time. In 2012, the race included a team time trial for the first time, which constituted the first stage of the race.[6] The team time-trial was retained for the 2013 edition.

List of winners[edit]

Rider Team
1962 Italy Enzo Moser (ITA) San Pellegrino
1963 Italy Guido De Rosso (ITA) Molteni
1964-
1979
No race
1979 Norway Knut Knudsen (NOR) Bianchi-Faema
1980 Italy Francesco Moser (ITA) Sanson
1981 Italy Roberto Visentini (ITA) Sammontana
1982 Italy Giuseppe Saronni (ITA) Del Tongo
1983 Italy Francesco Moser (ITA) Gis Gelati
1984 Italy Franco Chioccioli (ITA) Murella-Rossin
1985 Austria Harald Maier (AUT) Gis Gelati
1986 Italy Team edition (ITA) Carrera–Inoxpran
1987 Italy Claudio Corti (ITA) Supermercati Brianzoli
1988 Switzerland Urs Zimmerman (SUI) Carrera Jeans–Vagabond
1989 Italy Mauro Santaromita (ITA) Pepsi Cola-Alba Cucine
1990 Italy Gianni Bugno (ITA) Chateau d'Ax–Salotti
1991 Venezuela Leonardo Sierra (VEN) Selle Italia-Magniarredo
1992 Italy Claudio Chiappucci (ITA) Carrera Jeans–Vagabond
1993 Italy Maurizio Fondriest (ITA) Lampre-Polti
1994 Italy Moreno Argentin (ITA) Gewiss–Ballan
1995 Switzerland Heinz Imboden (SUI) Refin
1996 Italy Wladimir Belli (ITA) Panaria-Vinavil
1997 France Luc Leblanc (FRA) Polti
1998 Italy Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) Saeco Macchine per Caffè
1999 Italy Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) Saeco Macchine per Caffè–Cannondale
2000 Italy Simone Borgheresi (ITA) Mercatone Uno–Albacom
2001 Italy Francesco Casagrande (ITA) Fassa Bortolo
2002 Italy Francesco Casagrande (ITA) Fassa Bortolo
2003 Italy Gilberto Simoni (ITA) Saeco Macchine per Caffè
2004 Italy Damiano Cunego (ITA) Saeco Macchine per Caffè
2005 Mexico Julio Alberto Pérez (MEX) Ceramica Panaria–Navigare
2006 Italy Damiano Cunego (ITA) Lampre–Fondital
2007 Italy Damiano Cunego (ITA) Lampre–Fondital
2008 Italy Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Liquigas
2009 Italy Ivan Basso (ITA) Liquigas
2010 Kazakhstan Alexandre Vinokourov (KAZ) Astana
2011 Italy Michele Scarponi (ITA) Lampre–ISD
2012 Italy Domenico Pozzovivo (ITA) Colnago–CSF Bardiani
2013 Italy Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) Astana
2014 Australia Cadel Evans (AUS) BMC Racing Team
2015 Australia Richie Porte (AUS) Team Sky
2016 Spain Mikel Landa (ESP) Team Sky
2017 United Kingdom Geraint Thomas (GBR) Team Sky
2018 France Thibaut Pinot (FRA) Groupama–FDJ

Repeat winners[edit]

Wins Rider Editions
3  Damiano Cunego (ITA) 2004, 2006, 2007
2  Francesco Moser (ITA) 1980, 1983
 Paolo Savoldelli (ITA) 1998, 1999
 Francesco Casagrande (ITA) 2001, 2002
 Vincenzo Nibali (ITA) 2008, 2013

Wins per nation[edit]

Wins Country
30
 Italy
2
 Australia
 France
  Switzerland
1
 Kazakhstan
 Mexico
 Norway
 Austria
 Spain
 United Kingdom

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CyclingQuotes.com Trofeo Melinda and Giro del Trentino to merge". cyclingquotes.com. 
  2. ^ "Il Giro del Trentino diventa Tour of the Alps". trentinocorrierealpi.gelocal.it (in Italian). Archived from the original on 6 December 2016. Retrieved 22 April 2017. 
  3. ^ Un balzo nel passato Archived 2011-07-22 at the Wayback Machine. (in Italian). Giro al Sas. Retrieved on 2010-11-03.
  4. ^ "31st Giro del Trentino - 2.1". autobus.cyclingnews.com. Retrieved 22 April 2017. 
  5. ^ "Storia del Giro del Trentino" (in Italian). 
  6. ^ Atkins, Ben (April 14, 2012). "Danilo Di Luca motivated for the Giro del Trentino". velonation.com. 

External links[edit]