Glasgow Climate Pact

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The Glasgow Climate Pact is an agreement reached at the 2021 United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP26).[1]

Glasgow Climate Pact
Drafted31 October – 13 November 2021
Signed13 November 2021 [2]
LocationGlasgow, Scotland, United Kingdom
Parties197
DepositarySecretary-General of the United Nations
LanguagesEnglish
Full text
Glasgow Climate Pact at Wikisource

The pact is the first climate agreement explicitly planning to reduce unabated coal usage.[1] A pledge to "phase out" coal was changed to "phase down" late in negotiation, for coal in India and coal in China and other coal reliant countries.[3][4]

Development[edit]

The pact's main elements were:

Pledges[edit]

The number of countries pledged to reach net-zero emissions passed 140. This target includes 90% of current global greenhouse gas emissions.[6]

More than 100 countries, including Brazil, pledged to reverse deforestation by 2030.

More than 40 countries pledged to move away from coal.

India promised to draw half of its energy requirement from renewable sources by 2030.[7]

The governments of 24 developed countries and a group of major car manufacturers including GM, Ford, Volvo, BYD Auto, Jaguar Land Rover and Mercedes-Benz committed to "work towards all sales of new cars and vans being zero emission globally by 2040, and by no later than 2035 in leading markets".[8][9] Major car manufacturing nations like the US, Germany, China, Japan and South Korea, as well as Volkswagen, Toyota, Peugeot, Honda, Nissan and Hyundai, did not pledge.[10]

Reception[edit]

U.N. climate chief Patricia Espinosa stated that she was not happy with the last minute change of language affirmed by members of the Indian and Chinese parties but did say that, "No deal was the worst possible result there. Nobody wins,” stating she was satisfied with the deal overall. “We would have preferred a very clear statement about a phasing out of coal and (the) elimination of fossil fuel subsidies,” Espinosa said, but explained she understands India’s needs.[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Rincon, Paul (2021-11-14). "COP26: New global climate deal struck in Glasgow". BBC News.
  2. ^ FCCC, PA. "Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties" (PDF). Retrieved 2021-11-14.
  3. ^ Volcovici, Valerie; Abnett, Kate; James, William (2021-11-14). "U.N. climate agreement clinched after late drama over coal". Reuters. Retrieved 2021-11-14.
  4. ^ "Last-minute coal compromise in climate deal disappoints many at COP26". CBC News. The Associated Press. 2021-11-13. Retrieved 2021-11-14.
  5. ^ "Is carbon capture too expensive? – Analysis". IEA. Retrieved 2021-11-18.
  6. ^ "World heading for 2.4C global warming - report". 2021-11-09. {{cite journal}}: Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  7. ^ "India pledges net-zero emissions by 2070 — but also wants to expand coal mining". NPR. 2021-11-03.
  8. ^ "COP26: Deal to end car emissions by 2040 idles as motor giants refuse to sign". Financial Times. 2021-11-08.
  9. ^ "COP26: Every carmaker that pledged to stop selling fossil-fuel vehicles by 2040". CarExpert. 2021-11-11.
  10. ^ "COP26: Germany fails to sign up to 2040 combustion engine phaseout". Deutsche Welle. 2021-11-10.
  11. ^ Avanti, Pedro. "UN climate boss: 'Good compromise' beats no deal on warming". The Independent. Retrieved 2021-11-14.

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