Glass, Molders, Pottery, Plastics and Allied Workers International Union

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Glass, Molders, Pottery, Plastics and Allied Workers International Union (GMPIU)
Glass Molders Pottery Plastics and Allied Workers International Union logo - 2013.jpg
FoundedMay 1, 1988
DissolvedJanuary 1, 2018
HeadquartersMedia, Pennsylvania
Location
Members
27,864 (2013)[1]
AffiliationsAFL–CIO and CLC
Websitewww.gmpiu.org

The Glass, Molders, Pottery, Plastics and Allied Workers International Union (GMPIU) was a labor union representing craft and industrial workers primarily in the ceramics, china, craft metals, fiberglass, glass, insulation, and pottery industries, in the United States and Canada.

History[edit]

Membership (US records)[2]

Finances (US records; ×$1000)[2]
     Assets      Liabilities      Receipts      Disbursements

The union was established on May 1, 1988, when the Glass, Pottery, Plastics and Allied Workers' International Union merged with the International Molders and Allied Workers' Union.[3][4] The Coopers' International Union of North America followed in 1992.[3][5]

With the Coopers merger, the GMPIU had about 80,000 members in the United States and Canada in about 435 locals.[3] As of 1993, the GMP had 35 staff working at its headquarters.[3]

Job losses continued. As of 2009, the union had just 30,392 members.[6] The Great Recession cut heavily into its membership, and by the end of 2012 it had just under 28,000 members.[1] In 2016, the union agreed to merge into the United Steelworkers.[7] The merger was completed on January 1, 2018, and the union became the GMP Council of the Steelworkers.[8]

Presidents[edit]

1988: James E. Hatfield[9]
1994: Frank W. Carter[10]
1997: James H. Rankin[11]
2004: John P. Ryan[12][13]
2010: Bruce Smith[13][14]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b US Department of Labor, Office of Labor-Management Standards. File number 000-201. Report submitted January 21, 2014.
  2. ^ a b US Department of Labor, Office of Labor-Management Standards. File number 000-201. (Search)
  3. ^ a b c d Kennedy, Joseph S. "In Struggle To Survive, A Union Changes, Grows." Philadelphia Inquirer. January 21, 1993.
  4. ^ "History of organizations affiliated with the American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations" (PDF). UMD Labor Collections. University of Maryland. Retrieved 14 May 2022.
  5. ^ Chaison, p. 169.
  6. ^ US Department of Labor, Office of Labor-Management Standards. File number 000-201. Report submitted January 28, 2010.
  7. ^ "Glass Workers Union Merges with United Steelworkers". Industry Week. 11 August 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2022.
  8. ^ "Welcome to the USW!" (PDF). Horizons. January–February 2018. Retrieved 13 May 2022.
  9. ^ President Hatfield resigned at the union's Executive Board meeting after serving only two years of a four-year term.
  10. ^ President Carter served out the remainder of President Hatfield's term of office, and declined to run for election to a full term.
  11. ^ President Rankin assumed office on October 1, 1997. He won re-election in 2001, but did not serve out his full term. He stepped down as president in June 2004.
  12. ^ President Ryan was sworn in on July 1, 2004.
  13. ^ a b President Ryan resigned at the union's January 2010 Executive Board meeting. International Vice President Bruce R. Smith was sworn in as president. See: "GMP Executive Board Meets, Proposed Budget for 2010 Affirmed. " GMP Horizons. January/February 2010, p. 2. Accessed 2013-11-22.
  14. ^ President Smith served out the remaining two years of President Ryan's term. He was re-elected as president in 2013.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Chaison, Gary N. Union Mergers in Hard Times: The View From Five Countries. Ithaca, N.Y.: ILR Press, 1996.

External links[edit]