Glass Bowl (game)

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Cover of 1946 Official Program

The Glass Bowl was an annual post-season college football bowl game played from 1946 to 1949.[1] It was held at the University of Toledo's Glass Bowl.

Toledo had been a manufacturing center for glass objects, including automotive glass for nearby Detroit factories. Wayne Kohn, a shipyard worker at a Toledo glass company suggested to municipal leaders a "Glass Bowl" would be a way to build the city's and industry's prestige.[2] The University of Toledo made the announcement of the new bowl game at a press conference in New York City on October 25, 1946.[3]

The University of Toledo operated the Glass Bowl Game as part of its regular schedule. In the four seasons of 1946 through 1949, Toledo had winning records going into the December date. Toledo won the first three contests but their perfect Glass Bowl record was shattered by the University of Cincinnati in the fourth bowl.

In 1950, the game was to be played on December 2, however in early November the University of Toledo's athletic board voted to postpone the game until December 1951 – at the time, Toledo's record was 2–4.[4][5] In 1951, the University of Toledo called off the game scheduled for December 1, as no schools contacted had indicated they would take part in it;[6] the uncertainty of December weather was also cited.[7]

Like some other postseason match-ups of the era, such as the Grape Bowl and the Optimist Bowl, results are listed in NCAA records, but the games were not considered NCAA-sanctioned bowls.[1]

Game results[edit]

Date Played Winning Team Losing Team Attendance (est.) MVP
December 7, 1946 Toledo 21 Bates 12 12,000[1] Art Blanchard, HB, Bates[8]
December 6, 1947 Toledo 20 New Hampshire 14 13,500[1] Dick Huston, HB, Toledo[9]
December 4, 1948 Toledo 27 Oklahoma City 14  8,500[1] Lee Pete, QB, Toledo[10]
December 3, 1949 Cincinnati 33 Toledo 13  8,000[11] Gene Gibson, HB, Cincinnati[10]

1946: Toledo 21, Bates 12[edit]

Scoring summary
Quarter Time Drive Team Scoring information Score
Plays Yards TOP BAT TOL
1 2 82 BAT Al Howlett 66-yard touchdown run, Art Blanchard kick no good 6 0
2 TOL Tony Wolodzko 5-yard touchdown run, John Shutt kick good 6 7
3 11 69 TOL Dick Ehrhardt 5-yard touchdown run, John Shutt kick good 6 14
4 51 BAT Art Blanchard 5-yard touchdown run, 2-point attempt failed dagger 12 14
4 TOL Chuck Hardy 54-yard touchdown reception from Lee Pete, John Shutt kick good 12 21
"TOP" = time of possession. For other American football terms, see Glossary of American football. 12 21

 [12][13] daggerNewspaper accounts lack detail of the 4th quarter missed conversion.

1947: Toledo 20, New Hampshire 14[edit]

Scoring summary
Quarter Time Drive Team Scoring information Score
Plays Yards TOP UNH TOL
1 TOL Dick Huston 9-yard touchdown run, John Shutt kick good 0 7
2 TOL Dick Huston 27-yard touchdown run, John Shutt kick good 0 14
3 UNH Bob Mikszema 83-yard touchdown reception from Bruce Mather, George Kachavos kick good 7 14
4 TOL Dick Ehrhardt ?-yard touchdown run, John Shutt kick no good 7 20
4 UNH Carmen Ragonese 3-yard touchdown run, George Kachavos kick good 14 20
"TOP" = time of possession. For other American football terms, see Glossary of American football. 14 20

 [14][15]

1948: Toledo 27, Oklahoma City 14[edit]

Scoring summary
Quarter Time Drive Team Scoring information Score
Plays Yards TOP OCU TOL
1 TOL Jim Hays 9-yard touchdown run, John Shutt kick good 0 7
2 46 TOL Don Martin 12-yard touchdown reception from Lee Pete, John Shutt kick good 0 14
4 OCU Jim Wade 8-yard touchdown run, Frank Bruno kick good 7 14
4 TOL Chuck Hardy 16-yard touchdown reception from Lee Pete, John Shutt kick good dagger 7 21
4 TOL Chuck Hardy ?-yard touchdown run, kick no good dagger 7 27
4 50 OCU Jim Wade 9-yard touchdown run, Frank Bruno kick good 14 27
"TOP" = time of possession. For other American football terms, see Glossary of American football. 14 27

 [16][17] daggerNewspaper accounts are unclear as to which Chuck Hardy touchdown – rushing or passing – happened first in the 4th quarter, and which 4th quarter conversion failed.

1949: Cincinnati 33, Toledo 13[edit]

Scoring summary
Quarter Time Drive Team Scoring information Score
Plays Yards TOP CIN TOL
2 CIN Emerson Cole tackled in end zone for a safety by Jack Tracey 2 0
2 4 38 CIN Bobby Stratton 15-yard touchdown run, George Schuster kick good 9 0
2 32 CIN Joe Hauk 21-yard touchdown reception from Tom O'Malley, kick no good dagger 15 0
2 66 TOL Emerson Cole 8-yard touchdown run, kick no good dagger 15 6
3 CIN Bobby Stratton 29-yard touchdown run, kick no good dagger 21 6
3 CIN 77-yard punt return by Gene Gibson, kick no good dagger 27 6
4 CIN Interception returned 73 yards for touchdown by Gene Gibson, kick no good dagger 33 6
4 1:00 7 65 TOL George Miley 2-yard touchdown run, Martin kick good 33 13
"TOP" = time of possession. For other American football terms, see Glossary of American football. 33 13

 [11][18] daggerNewspaper accounts lack detail of the missed conversions.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "BOWL/ALL STAR GAME RECORDS" (PDF). NCAA. 2016. Retrieved January 7, 2017. 
  2. ^ Hegner, Bill (December 2, 1946). "The Sports Scene"Paid subscription required. The Sandusky Register. Retrieved January 14, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  3. ^ "Toledo Shoots For Place in Grid Big Time"Paid subscription required. The Berkshire Eagle. UP. October 25, 1946. Retrieved January 14, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  4. ^ "No Glass Bowl Game This Year"Paid subscription required. Corpus Christi Caller-Times. AP. November 3, 1950. Retrieved January 14, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  5. ^ "Toledoans Crippled; Glass Bowl Tilt Off"Paid subscription required. The Cincinnati Enquirer. AP. November 4, 1950. Retrieved January 14, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  6. ^ Ada Evening News, November 15, 1951
  7. ^ "Toledo Cancels Glass Bowl Game"Paid subscription required. Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. AP. November 15, 1951. Retrieved January 14, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  8. ^ "It's Brief---And It's News"Paid subscription required. Detroit Free Press. December 10, 1946. Retrieved January 14, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  9. ^ "Most Valuable Player Chosen"Paid subscription required. The Evening Independent. Massillon, Ohio. AP. December 9, 1947. Retrieved January 14, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  10. ^ a b "HONOR FOR GIBSON"Paid subscription required. The Cincinnati Enquirer. December 7, 1949. Retrieved January 14, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  11. ^ a b Forbes, Dick (December 4, 1949). "UC DEFEATS TOLEDO IN GLASS BOWL, 33-13"Paid subscription required. The Cincinnati Enquirer. Retrieved January 20, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  12. ^ "Glass Bowl Game Won By Rockets"Paid subscription required. The Zanesville Signal. Zanesville, Ohio. AP. December 8, 1946. Retrieved January 20, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  13. ^ "TOLEDO DEFEATS BATES, 21 TO 12, IN GLASS BOWL"Paid subscription required. Chicago Tribune. AP. December 8, 1946. Retrieved January 20, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  14. ^ "Wildcats' Win Streak Broken In 20-14 Duel"Paid subscription required. The Capital. Annapolis, Maryland. AP. December 7, 1947. Retrieved January 20, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  15. ^ "Toledo Passes Shatter New Hampshire in Glass Bowl, 20-14"Paid subscription required. Detroit Free Press. UP. December 7, 1947. Retrieved January 20, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  16. ^ "Rockets On Top, 27-14, In Glass Bowl Game"Paid subscription required. The Cincinnati Enquirer. AP. December 5, 1948. Retrieved January 21, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  17. ^ "Toledo Stomps Oklahoma City 27-14, In Glass Bowl Contest"Paid subscription required. Valley Morning Star. Harlingen, Texas. UP. December 5, 1948. Retrieved January 21, 2017 – via newspapers.com. 
  18. ^ "Glass Bowl Tilt Goes To Cincinnati"Paid subscription required. Portland Press Herald. AP. December 4, 1949. Retrieved January 21, 2017 – via newspapers.com.