Glen Motz

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Glen Motz
MPGlenMotz.jpg
Member of Parliament
for Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner
Assumed office
October 24, 2016
Preceded byJim Hillyer
Personal details
Born
1958 (age 63–64)

Hanna, Alberta, Canada
Political partyConservative
ResidenceMedicine Hat, Alberta, Canada
Alma materHillcrest Christian College

Glen Motz MP (born 1958) is a Canadian politician who was re-elected for his second term to the House of Commons of Canada in the 2019 Canadian federal election on October 21, 2019.[1] Motz was first elected in a by-election on October 24, 2016[2] after the death of former MP Jim Hillyer.[3] He represents the electoral district of Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner as a member of the Conservative Party of Canada.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Prior to his election, Motz served for 35 years with the Medicine Hat Police Service and retired as Inspector in 2015.[5]

Motz attended Hillcrest Christian College circa 1976 in Medicine Hat,[citation needed] which has since merged with the Mountain View Bible College to form the Rocky Mountain College, Calgary, an affiliate of the Evangelical Missionary Church of Canada.[6] He earned a Bachelor of Religious Education Degree from the Medicine Hat College in 1980. In that same year, Motz was called to his policing career in Medicine Hat.[citation needed]

Political career[edit]

In 2017, Glen Motz was promoted to Deputy Shadow Minister for Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness. After the 2019 election, he was named the Associate Shadow Minister for Public Safety and Emergency Preparedness.[7] Motz was re-elected again in 2021.

Electoral record[edit]

2021 Canadian federal election
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Glen Motz 31,648 65.4 -13.8
New Democratic Jocelyn Stenger 6,816 14.1 +5.4
People's Brodie Heidinger 4,484 9.3 +6.8
Liberal Hannah Wilson 3,515 7.3 +0.7
Maverick Geoff Shoesmith 1,226 2.5 N/A
Green Diandra Bruised Head 725 1.5 -0.8
Total valid votes 48,414 99.4
Total rejected ballots 274 0.6
Turnout 48,688 61.4
Eligible voters 79,218
Conservative hold Swing -9.6
Source: Elections Canada[8]
2019 Canadian federal election: Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner
Party Candidate Votes % ±% Expenditures
Conservative Glen Motz 42,045 79.2 +10.4 $23,502.89
New Democratic Elizabeth Thomson 4,639 8.7 +7.67 $0.00
Liberal Harris Kirshenbaum 3,528 6.6 –19.02 $11,654.42
People's Andrew Nelson 1,350 2.5 $1,717.79
Green Shannon Hawthorne 1,203 2.3 $0.00
Independent Dave Phillips 337 0.6 none listed
Total valid votes/expense limit 53,102 100.0
Total rejected ballots 254
Turnout 53,356 68.1
Eligible voters 78,384
Conservative hold Swing +0.91
Source: Elections Canada[9][10]
Canadian federal by-election, October 24, 2016: Medicine Hat—Cardston—Warner
Due to the death of Jim Hillyer
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Conservative Glen Motz 23,932 69.85 +1.05
Liberal Stan Sakamoto 8,778 25.62 +7.68
Christian Heritage Rod Taylor 702 2.05
New Democratic Beverly Ann Waege 353 1.03 -8.64
Libertarian Sheldon Johnston 284 0.83
Rhinoceros Kayne Cooper 211 0.62
Total valid votes/Expense limit 34,260 100.00 –  
Total rejected ballots -
Turnout 44.54
Eligible voters 76,911
Conservative hold Swing -3.32
Sources: Elections Canada[11]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Motz wins Medicine Hat-Cardston-Warner seat". The Lethbridge Herald - News and Sports from around Lethbridge. 2019-10-22. Retrieved 2019-11-19.
  2. ^ "Letter". Emergency Medicine News. 38 (5): 20. May 2016. doi:10.1097/01.eem.0000483189.93790.38. ISSN 1054-0725.
  3. ^ "Jim Hillyer's family says '13 years were a bonus' after cancer scare". Global News. Retrieved 2019-11-19.
  4. ^ "Conservative Glen Motz thanks Trudeau after winning Medicine Hat-Cardston-Warner byelection". CBC News, October 24, 2016.
  5. ^ "Conservative Glen Motz rolls to byelection win". Medicine Hat News, October 24, 2016.
  6. ^ "History - Pathways - Powered by Rocky Mountain College". www.rockymountaincollege.ca.
  7. ^ "Andrew Scheer Announces Conservative Shadow Cabinet". Canada's Official Opposition. November 29, 2019.
  8. ^ "List of confirmed candidates – September 20, 2021 Federal Election". Elections Canada. Retrieved 2 September 2021.
  9. ^ "List of confirmed candidates". Elections Canada. Retrieved October 4, 2019.
  10. ^ "Election Night Results". Elections Canada. Retrieved November 6, 2019.
  11. ^ Canada, Elections. "Voter Information Service - List of candidates". www.elections.ca.