Glen Pearson

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For the Australian politician, see Glen Pearson (Australian politician).
Glen Pearson
MP
Member of the Canadian Parliament
for London North Centre
In office
November 27, 2006 – 2011
Preceded by Joe Fontana
Succeeded by Susan Truppe
Personal details
Born (1950-12-26) December 26, 1950 (age 66)
Calgary, Alberta
Political party Liberal
Spouse(s) Jane Roy
Residence London, Ontario
Profession firefighter
Religion United Church of Canada

Glen Douglas Pearson (born December 26, 1950) is a politician in Ontario, Canada. He is a former Member of Parliament for London North Centre, and is a member of the Liberal Party of Canada.

Life and career[edit]

Pearson was born in Calgary, Alberta. He is a professional firefighter in London, Ontario, well known for his charitable and humanitarian activities. He retired as a captain in the London Fire Department, where he worked for 29 years, but he is perhaps better known as the co-founder and volunteer executive director of the London Food Bank for over 25 years.[1] He has also previously been involved in the Ontario Association of Food Banks as a Board member, serving one term as Chairperson.[2]

Since 1998, along with his wife, Jane Roy, Pearson has worked on human rights and development projects in Sudan. This work included building schools and infrastructure, general community development and campaigning against slavery.[3]

On August 15, 2007, Pearson reunited his Sudanese born adoptive daughter, Abuk Roy, with her twin sister, Achan and brother Ater, who were previously thought to be dead.[4]

Politics[edit]

Pearson originally stood as the Liberal candidate in London—Fanshawe in the general election of January 23, 2006, losing to Irene Mathyssen of the New Democratic Party.[5]

Following the resignation of Joe Fontana in London North Centre, he was elected in the resulting by-election on November 27, 2006.[6] His closest competition was Green Party of Canada leader Elizabeth May, who received 26% of the vote.[7]

His campaign emphasized environmental, health care and accountability issues.

He supported Stéphane Dion in the Liberal leadership election, and introduced him on the night of the candidate speeches.[8]

Pearson was re-elected in the 2008 federal election,[1] but was defeated by Conservative Susan Truppe when he ran for re-election in 2011.[9]

Electoral record[edit]

Canadian federal election, 2011
Party Candidate Votes % ∆% Expenditures
Conservative Susan Truppe 19,468 36.96 +3.99
Liberal Glen Pearson 17,803 33.80 -5.33
New Democratic German Gutierrez 12,996 24.67 +7.20
Green Mary Ann Hodge 2,177 4.13 -6.30
Animal Alliance AnnaMaria Valastro 229 0.43
Total valid votes 52,673 100.00
Total rejected ballots 231 0.44 +0.03
Turnout 52,904 59.69
Eligible voters 88,624
London North Centre - Canadian federal election, 2008
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Liberal Glen Pearson 21,018 39.13% +4.27%
Conservative Paul Van Meerbergen 17,712 32.97% +8.49%
New Democratic Steve Holmes 9,387 17.47% +3.39%
Green Mary Ann Hodge 5,603 10.43% -15.41%
Total valid votes 53,720
Total rejected ballots 222
Turnout 53,942


Canadian federal by-election, November 27, 2006: London North Centre
Resignation of Joe Fontana
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Glen Pearson 13,287 34.85% −5.27
Green Elizabeth May 9,864 25.87% +20.38
Conservative Dianne Haskett 9,309 24.42% −5.48
New Democratic Megan Walker 5,388 14.13% −9.62
Progressive Canadian Steven Hunter 145 0.38% −0.09
Independent Robert Ede 77 0.20%
Canadian Action Will Arlow 53 0.14%
Total 38,123 100.00%
London—Fanshawe - Canadian federal election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes % ±
New Democratic Irene Mathyssen 16,067
Liberal Glen Pearson 15,199
Conservative Dan Mailer 12,034
Green David McLaughlin 1803

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "An unpolitical farewell". London Free Press. May 16, 2011. Retrieved 2015-10-24. 
  2. ^ "Rookie Liberal MP Pearson's Sudan story". The Hill Times. January 28, 2008. Retrieved 2015-10-24. 
  3. ^ "Lost and found in Africa". Toronto Star. April 25, 2007. Retrieved 2015-10-24. 
  4. ^ "MP reunites long-lost Sudanese siblings in Canada". CTV News. August 17, 2007. Retrieved 2015-10-24. 
  5. ^ "Canada Votes 2006: London-Fanshawe". CBC News. January 23, 2006. Retrieved 2015-10-24. 
  6. ^ "Tories shut out of two federal byelections". Canada.com. November 27, 2006. Retrieved 2015-10-24. 
  7. ^ "Green party 'has arrived' after finishing 2nd in byelection". CBC News. November 28, 2006. Retrieved 2015-10-24. 
  8. ^ "Dion promises Liberals will "be ready for an election"". Canada.com. December 4, 2006. Retrieved 2015-10-24. 
  9. ^ "London North Centre turns blue". The Londoner. May 5, 2011. Retrieved 2015-10-24. 

External links[edit]