Glenapp Castle

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Glenapp Castle
General information
Location Ballantrae, South Ayrshire, KA26 0NZ, Scotland
Opening 1870 (hotel: 2000)
Owner Paul and Poppy Szkiler
Design and construction
Developer David Bryce
Other information
Number of rooms 17 bedrooms/suites (73 room castle)
Website
glenappcastle.com/
Glenapp Castle, south-east facade
Glenapp Castle, south-west facade

Glenapp Castle, formerly the family seat of the Earl of Inchcape,[2] is now a luxury hotel[3] and restaurant located about 1.5 miles (2.4 km) south east of Ballantrae, South Ayrshire, Scotland.[4]


The castle was built for the Deputy Lord Lieutenant of the County, James Hunter.[5] It has no older origin.[4] Designed by the famous Scottish architect David Bryce the Deputy Lord Lieutenant of Ayrshire at the time, the Castle was finished in 1870.[6] It is a noteworthy example of the Scottish Baronial style of architecture [7][8] The Inchcape family owned the castle from 1917 until the early 1980s. Pioneering aviator Elsie Mackay, daughter of the first Earl of Inchcape, lived at the castle until her untimely death in 1928 in an attempt to fly the Atlantic in a single engined Stinson Detroiter.[9]The Castle opened as a hotel in 2000; entry to the castle and its grounds is only for guests with a room or restaurant reservation.

Location[edit]

Glenapp Castle is near Ballantrae, Ayrshire and overlooks several well known Scottish Islands: Ailsa Craig, Arran and Mull of Kintyre. The site is also close to Galloway Forest Park, Mull of Galloway, Culzean Castle and several significant Scottish botanical gardens such as Logan Gardens, Castle Kennedy Gardens. The actual castle and its buildings are almost a mile from the electronically gated entrance.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Full list of Michelin stars in Britain and Ireland". Telegraph.co.uk. 24 January 2008. Retrieved 2009-06-23. 
  2. ^ History, glenappcastle.com, accessed online 2010-01-13.
  3. ^ Home page, glenappcastle.com, accessed online 2010-01-13.
  4. ^ a b Coventry, Martin (2001). The Castles of Scotland. Musselburgh: Goblinshead. p. 190 ISBN 1-899874-26-7
  5. ^ http://www.scotlandinoils.com/clan/Clan-Hunter.html
  6. ^ http://www.glenappcastle.com/history.htm
  7. ^ Rosenberg, Tina (2010). Glenapp Castle: A Scottish Intrigue. Iuniverse. ISBN 1-4401-9714-8. 
  8. ^ http://www.tinarosenberg.net/index.php?page_id=236
  9. ^ BBC Radio 4 Making History - Elsie Mackay - article and downloadable broadcast

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 55°05′03″N 4°59′19″W / 55.08411°N 4.98848°W / 55.08411; -4.98848