Gleneagles railway station

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Gleneagles National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Gleann Eagas
Gleneagles railway station.jpg
Location
Place Auchterarder
Local authority Perth and Kinross
Coordinates 56°16′30″N 3°43′52″W / 56.2750°N 3.7310°W / 56.2750; -3.7310Coordinates: 56°16′30″N 3°43′52″W / 56.2750°N 3.7310°W / 56.2750; -3.7310
Grid reference NN929105
Operations
Station code GLE
Managed by Abellio ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2011/12 Increase 39,570
2012/13 Increase 43,602
2013/14 Increase 49,728
2014/15 Increase 59,350
2015/16 Increase 66,698
History
Original company Scottish Central Railway
Pre-grouping Caledonian Railway
Post-grouping LMSR
14 March 1856 Opened as Crieff Junction
1 April 1912 Renamed Gleneagles
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Gleneagles from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
170433 at Edinburgh Waverley.JPG UK Railways portal

Gleneagles railway station serves the town of Auchterarder in Perth and Kinross, Scotland.

History[edit]

The station was opened by the Scottish Central Railway on 14 March 1856 and was originally named Crieff Junction.[1] There was another station with the name of Crieff Junction to the north of this station which was only short-lived. The branch northwestward to Crieff was opened (by the Crieff Junction Railway company) on the same day. On 1 April 1912 it was renamed Gleneagles.[2]

The station was rebuilt and the junction remodelled by the Caledonian Railway in 1919 following their takeover of the Scottish Central Railway. The Caledonian Railway built the nearby Gleneagles Hotel, which opened in 1925. The hotel served as the location for the G8 summit in 2005 and is a well known golf resort; Gleneagles hosted the 2014 Ryder Cup.

In anticipation of the 2014 Ryder Cup, Gleneagles railway station underwent a major refurbishment as part of a £7 million program to improve transport infrastructure in the area. Work was completed in April 2014, seeing the old station building regenerated with a lift, new platforms built upon the original ones, the fitting of Passenger information boards, additional regenerative paint work and a newly built car park built to connect with the new main road from the motorway.

The branch line to Crieff closed on 6 July 1964 due to the Beeching Axe.

Services[edit]

On weekdays & Saturdays there are 14 services to Glasgow Queen Street & 2 to Edinburgh Waverley southbound and 15 to Perth northbound; most of these continue to either Dundee or Aberdeen, though there are also a limited number of trains to/from Inverness via the Highland Main Line.[3] The service frequency is however somewhat irregular, with large gaps in the timetable at certain times of day.

Gleneagles is also served by the daily Highland Chieftain through service between Inverness and London King's Cross and the Caledonian Sleeper to London Euston each evening except Saturdays.

From 2018, services from the station will be increased as part of a timetable upgrade package backed by Transport Scotland. A regular hourly-interval each way service between Glasgow, Perth, & Dundee will be introduced that will stop here.[4]

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Dunblane   Virgin Trains East Coast
East Coast Main Line
  Perth
Dunblane   Abellio ScotRail
Highland Main Line
  Perth
Dunblane   Caledonian Sleeper
Highland Caledonian Sleeper
  Perth
Historical railways
Blackford
Line open; Station closed
  Caledonian Railway
Scottish Central Railway
  Auchterarder
Line open; Station closed
Terminus   Caledonian Railway
Crieff Junction Railway
  Tullibardine
Line open; Station closed

References[edit]

  1. ^ Butt 1995, p. 71
  2. ^ Butt 1995, pp. 71,104
  3. ^ GB National Rail Timetable May-December 2016, Table 229 (Network Rail)
  4. ^ "‘Rail revolution’ means 200 more services and 20,000 more seats for Scots passengers"Transport Scotland press release 15 March 2016; Retrieved 18 August 2016

Sources[edit]

External links[edit]