Glenn B. Warren

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Glenn Barton Warren (February 28, 1898 – January 11, 1979) was an American mechanical engineer, business executive and inventor, who was vice president and general manager of the turbine division of General Electric. In 1951 he was awarded the ASME Medal.[1]

Born in Rich Hill, Missouri, Warren grew up in Girard, Kansas.[2] He obtained his BSc at the University of Wisconsin in 1919 with a thesis on combined gas-steam cycles.[3] After his graduation in 1919 he started his lifelong career at General Electric. He started as member of the Test Engineering Program,[4] and made it vice president and general manager of the turbine division at General Electric.

Warren was awarded the ASME Medal in 1951, and in the year 1959-60 served as president of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. In 1970 he awarded the John Fritz Medal by the American Association of Engineering Societies.

Selected publications[edit]

  • Walter Edward Blowney, Glenn B. Warren. The Increase in Thermal Efficiency Due to Resuperheating in Steam Turbines. University of Wisconsin—Madison, 1924.
  • Glenn B. Warren. Proposed Reciprocating Internal Combustion Engine with Constant Pressure Combustion: Combustion Chamber Separated from Cylinders (modified Brayton Cycle). Society of Automotive Engineers, 1969.
  • Glenn B. Warren, Some factors influencing motorcar fuel consumption in service, 1965.
Patents, a selection

References[edit]

  1. ^ Modern Power & Engineering, Vol. 45. 1951. p. 97
  2. ^ John Fritz Medal Board (1969). John Fritz Medal: Supplement.
  3. ^ David Gordon Wilson, Theodosios Korakianitis. The Design of High-Efficiency Turbomachinery and Gas Turbines, 2014. p. 18.
  4. ^ General Electric. The General Electric Story: A Heritage of Innovation, 1876-1999. 2000. p. 149.