Glenn Horiuchi

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Glenn Horiuchi

Glenn Horiuchi (February 27, 1955 – June 3, 2000) was an American jazz pianist, composer, and shamisen player. He was a central figure in the development of the Asian American jazz movement.

He gave performances all around the world for example at the Berlin Jazz Festival, Vancouver Jazz Festival, Mexico's Japan Fest, Seattle's Earshot Festival, Asian American Jazz Festival in San Francisco and Chicago, New York's Japan and Asia Societies, Los Angeles Festival, at Yale University, and Brown University.[1]

Horiuchi performed with Joseph Jarman, Wadada Leo Smith, George Lewis, John Tchicai, Art Davis, Francis Wong, Miya Masaoka, Tatsu Aoki, William Roper, Mark Izu, and San Jose Taiko. He recorded for the Asian Improv and Soul Note labels.

He also lectured and gave workshops at universities around the U.S. such as U.C. Berkeley, Wesleyan University, Northeastern University, and Stanford University. Horiuchi had many diverse talents and interests: besides attending graduate school in mathematics he had work experience as an auto mechanic, construction worker, and music teacher. He also had a long history of student and community activism including the campaign for Japanese Americans to win Redress/Reparations for the World War II incarceration in American concentration camps.[2]

He served as an Artist in Residence teaching at the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles, California. He was also a Zen practitioner of the Kwan Um School.

Horiuchi was diagnosed with colon cancer in August 1999, and died on June 3, 2000. His final concert was held at the Japan America Theater a few months before his death.

Discography[edit]

As leader/co-leader[edit]

Year recorded Title Label Personnel/Notes
1988 Oxnard Beet Soul Note With Francis Wong (tenor sax, flute), Taiji Miyagawa (bass), Leon Alexander (drums, vibes)[3]
1988? Next Step Asian Improv
1989? Manzanar Voices Asian Improv
1989? Issei Spirit Asian Improv
1991 Poston Sonata Asian Improv with Lillian Nakano (shamisen)[3]
1992? Little Tokyo Suite Asian Improv cassette only
1993? Live in Berlin Asian Improv cassette only
1994–95 Dewdrop Asian Improv With William Roper (tabla, vocals), Francis Wong (tenor sax, clarinet, flute, vocals), Joseph Mitchell (percussion)[3]
1994–95 Kenzo's Vision Asian Improv with Francis Wong (tenor sax)[3]
1995 Elegy for Sarajevo Asian Improv With William Roper (tabla, vocals), Francis Wong (tenor sax, clarinet, flute, vocals), Joseph Mitchell (percussion)[3]
1995 Hilltop View Music & Arts [3]
1995 Calling Is It and Now Soul Note With Francis Wong (tenor sax), Anders Swanson (bass), Jeanette Wrate (drums)[3]
1996 Mercy Music & Arts with Francis Wong, Joseph Jarman (alto sax)[3]
1998? Pachinko Dream Track 10 Music & Arts Jarman/Horiuchi/Wong
1999 Fair Play Soul Note With William Roper (tabla, vocals), Francis Wong (tenor sax, flute, vocals), Jeanette Wrate (drums, vocals)[3]

As sideman[edit]

What's the Difference Between, Miya Masaoka, Victo 0058, 1998

Golden Hearts Remembrance, Leo Smith, Chap Chap CPCD 002, 1997

Pilgrimage, Francis Wong, Music and Arts CD-974, 1997

Devotee, Francis Wong/Genny Lim, Asian Improv AIR-0030, 1997

The Asian American Experience, Primary Source Media 7909 (CD-Rom), 1997

Sounds like 1996: Music by Asian American Artists, IEL 0002 1996

RMB Sampler, various artists, Marc Sabatella, 1996

Family, Anthony Brown, Asian Improv AIR-0027, 1996

Ming, Francis Wong, Asian Improv AIR-0020, 1995

References[edit]

  1. ^ Glenn Horiuchi - Piano, Shamisen, Composition Archived 2006-01-17 at the Wayback Machine
  2. ^ Glenn Horiuchi - Piano, Shamisen, Composition Archived 2006-01-17 at the Wayback Machine
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i Cook, Richard; Morton, Brian (2008). The Penguin Guide to Jazz Recordings (9th ed.). Penguin. p. 725. ISBN 978-0-141-03401-0.

External links[edit]

See also[edit]