Glenn L. Pace

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Glenn L. Pace
Emeritus General Authority
October 2, 2010 (2010-10-02) – May 16, 2017 (2017-05-16)
Called by Thomas S. Monson
First Quorum of the Seventy
October 3, 1992 (1992-10-03) – October 2, 2010 (2010-10-02)
Called by Ezra Taft Benson
End reason Granted general authority emeritus status
Second Counselor in the General Young Men's Presidency
2001 – 2004
Called by F. Melvin Hammond
Second Counselor in the Presiding Bishopric
April 6, 1985 (1985-04-06) – October 3, 1992 (1992-10-03)
Called by Robert D. Hales
End reason Honorably released
Personal details
Born Glenn Leroy Pace
(1940-03-21)March 21, 1940
Provo, Utah, U.S.
Died May 16, 2017(2017-05-16) (aged 77)
Bountiful, Utah, U.S.

Glenn Leroy Pace ((1940-03-21)March 21, 1940 – May 16, 2017(2017-05-16)) was a general authority of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church) from 1985 until his death. As a general authority, he served as a counselor in the presiding bishopric and also in the First Quorum of Seventy. In 2010, he was designated an emeritus general authority.

Early life and education[edit]

Pace was born to Kenneth LeRoy Pace and his wife, the former Elizabeth Anna Wilde, in Provo, Utah, where he was also raised. In the early 1960s, he served as an LDS missionary in the New England region of the United States. Pace received bachelor's and master's degrees in accounting from Brigham Young University.[1]

Employment[edit]

Pace worked for two "big eight" financial firms and as a CFO of a land development firm. In 1980 he decided to take a job working full time for the LDS Church so he could focus more on spiritual matters.[2] That same year he quickly moved from a low level accountant position to welfare services manager.[3] Among other assignments while in this position Pace accompanied M. Russell Ballard on a trip to Ethiopia in early 1985 to determine what assistance the church could provide in providing famine relief.[4]

LDS Church service[edit]

Pace served in the LDS Church as an elders quorum president, counselor in a bishopric, and stake clerk.

In 1985, when Robert D. Hales became the church's presiding bishop, Pace was appointed as his second counselor. One role he had in this position was doing an initial search into allegations of ritualized abuse committed by Church members (see Pace memorandum). In 1992, Pace was released from the Presiding Bishopric and became a member of the First Quorum of the Seventy.[5] That same year he served as the first president of the church's Australia Sydney North Mission, while also serving in the First Quorum of Seventy.[6]

In 1997 and 1998, he was a member of the general presidency of the church's Sunday School and from 2001[7] to 2003[8] he was in the general presidency of the Young Men organization.

Pace was released and designated an emeritus general authority at the church's October 2010 general conference.[9]

Personal life[edit]

Pace married Jolene Clayson in the Salt Lake Temple in 1963[10] and they had six children. He died on May 16, 2017 in Bountiful, Utah, at age 77.[11]

Books[edit]

Pace has written three books:

  • Spiritual Plateaus (Deseret Book, 1991), about three plateaus Latter-day Saints face: testimony, sanctification, and spiritual graduate school.
  • Spiritual Revival (Deseret Book, 1993).
  • Safe Journey: An African Adventure (Shadow Mountain, 2003), about his various journeys in Africa, many of which were connected with the operations of the LDS Humanitarian Services.

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ 2008 Deseret News Church Almanac (Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret Morning News, 2007) p. 49.
  2. ^ Salt Lake Tribune obituary for Pace]
  3. ^ "Glenn L. Pace, Second Counselor in the Presiding Bishopric," Ensign, May 1985, p. 95.
  4. ^ M. Russell Ballard, "Prepare to Serve," Ensign, May 1985, p. 41.
  5. ^ "New callings and releases: First Quorum of the Seventy". Church News. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret News. October 10, 1992. Retrieved 2009-01-20. 
  6. ^ "New mission president". Church News. Deseret News. November 28, 1992. Retrieved 2009-01-20. 
  7. ^ "Changes in leadership made". Church News. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret News. October 6, 2001. Retrieved 2009-01-20. 
  8. ^ "6 full-time general authorities released". Church News. Salt Lake City, Utah: Deseret News. October 4, 2003. Retrieved 2009-01-20. 
  9. ^ Scott Taylor (October 3, 2010). "Five Mormon Church leaders given emeritus status". Deseret News. Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Retrieved 2010-10-03. 
  10. ^ Salt Lake Tribune Obituary for Pace
  11. ^ Mims, Bob (May 18, 2017). "Longtime Mormon leader Glenn Pace, who steered faith's welfare services, business ventures, dies at 77". The Salt Lake Tribune. Retrieved May 21, 2017. 

External links[edit]

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints titles
Preceded by
F. Melvin Hammond
Second Counselor in the General Young Men's Presidency
2001 – 2003
Succeeded by
Lynn G. Robbins
Preceded by
J. Richard Clarke
Second Counselor in the Presiding Bishopric
April 6, 1985 – October 3, 1992
Succeeded by
Richard C. Edgley