Glenvil, Nebraska

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Glenvil, Nebraska
Village
Downtown Glenvil: Winters Avenue
Downtown Glenvil: Winters Avenue
Location of Glenvil, Nebraska
Location of Glenvil, Nebraska
Coordinates: 40°30′9″N 98°15′13″W / 40.50250°N 98.25361°W / 40.50250; -98.25361Coordinates: 40°30′9″N 98°15′13″W / 40.50250°N 98.25361°W / 40.50250; -98.25361
Country United States
State Nebraska
County Clay
Area[1]
 • Total 0.17 sq mi (0.44 km2)
 • Land 0.17 sq mi (0.44 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation 1,841 ft (561 m)
Population (2010)[2]
 • Total 310
 • Estimate (2012[3]) 304
 • Density 1,823.5/sq mi (704.1/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP code 68941
Area code(s) 402
FIPS code 31-19070[4]
GNIS feature ID 0829548[5]

Glenvil is a village in Clay County, Nebraska, United States. The settlement has formerly also been known as Glenville. The population was 310 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Hastings, Nebraska Micropolitan Statistical Area.

History[edit]

Glenvil was founded in 1873 when the St. Joseph & Denver City Railroad was extended to that point.[6][7]

The Glenvil post office, first established in 1873 (in the year the settlement was first surveyed[8]) was spelled Glenville until 1914.[9]

Glenville's population peaked at about 300 in the 1920s, and fell to about half that in 1998.[8]

Glenville's first school was organized during 1871-72 and, like other rural schools, was housed in a wood frame building. It was demolished by a tornado and rebuilt in 1882. The Glenville School, the first substantial school in the village, operated from 1903 to 1995 and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[8]

Geography[edit]

Glenvil is located at 40°30′9″N 98°15′13″W / 40.50250°N 98.25361°W / 40.50250; -98.25361 (40.502586, -98.253710).[10]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.17 square miles (0.44 km2), all of it land.[1]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 246
1910 304 23.6%
1920 400 31.6%
1930 376 −6.0%
1940 285 −24.2%
1950 281 −1.4%
1960 323 14.9%
1970 332 2.8%
1980 363 9.3%
1990 304 −16.3%
2000 332 9.2%
2010 310 −6.6%
Est. 2015 298 [11] −3.9%
U.S. Decennial Census[12]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[2] of 2010, there were 310 people, 125 households, and 83 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,823.5 inhabitants per square mile (704.1/km2). There were 137 housing units at an average density of 805.9 per square mile (311.2/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 92.9% White, 1.6% African American, 0.6% Native American, 1.9% from other races, and 2.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.5% of the population.

There were 125 households of which 35.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.6% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.6% had a male householder with no wife present, and 33.6% were non-families. 28.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.06.

The median age in the village was 38 years. 28.1% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 23.6% were from 25 to 44; 26.2% were from 45 to 64; and 15.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 49.7% male and 50.3% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[4] of 2000, there were 332 people, 132 households, and 97 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,999.8 people per square mile (754.0/km²). There were 139 housing units at an average density of 837.3 per square mile (315.7/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 98.49% White and 1.51% Asian.

There were 132 households out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.6% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.8% were non-families. 22.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 2.89.

In the village, the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 15.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 103.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 112.2 males.

As of 2000 the median income for a household in the village was $36,875, and the median income for a family was $39,625. Males had a median income of $26,417 versus $15,938 for females. The per capita income for the village was $18,532. About 1.8% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including none of those under the age of eighteen or sixty-five or over.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 24, 2012. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  2. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-06-24. 
  3. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 17, 2013. Retrieved 2013-05-29. 
  4. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  5. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ Burr, George L. (1921). History of Hamilton and Clay Counties, Nebraska, Volume 1. S.J. Clarke Publishing Company. p. 104. 
  7. ^ "Glenvil, Clay County". Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies. University of Nebraska. Retrieved August 3, 2014. 
  8. ^ a b c Melissa Dirr (November 1998). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Glenville School / NeHBS #CY06-00" (PDF). National Park Service. Retrieved August 10, 2016.  with six photos from 1998
  9. ^ "Clay County". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 25 August 2014. 
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  11. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. [permanent dead link]
  12. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on May 12, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.