GlobalSecurity.org

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GlobalSecurity.org is a nonpartisan,[1] independent,[2][3] nonprofit organization[4] that serves as a think tank,[5][6] research and consultancy group,[7][8][9][10] and website. It is focused on national and international security issues;[11] military analysis, systems, and strategies;[9][12] intelligence matters;[13][14] and space policy analysis.[15][16] It was founded in December 2000 by John Pike, who had previously worked since 1983[17] with the Federation of American Scientists, where he directed the space policy, cyberstrategy, military analysis, nuclear resource, and intelligence resource projects.[4] GlobalSecurity.org is headquartered in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area in Alexandria, Virginia,[18][19] and John Pike is its director.[20]

The website's target audience includes journalists, policy-makers, scholars, political scientists, military and defense personnel, and the public.[21][19] It supplies background information and developing news stories,[22] providing online analysis and articles that analyze what are sometimes little-discussed topics[19] in categories that include WMDs, military and defense, security and cybersecurity, intelligence, and space technology.[23][24][25] It also disseminates primary documentation and other original materials,[19] provides detailed, high-resolution satellite images and video footage from war zones,[26][27][28] and provides definitions of widely used terms for the public.[29] The organization also serves as a defense, military, foreign-policy, and national-security watchdog group.[28][30][31][32][33][34]

In part it seeks to find new approaches to international security, and promotes achieving cooperative international security and preventing nuclear proliferation.[19][24][35] To this end it seeks to improve intelligence-community capabilities to respond to new threats and to prevent the need for military action, while at the same time enhancing the effectiveness of military forces when needed.[24]

GlobalSecurity.org was listed in the War Intelligence category of Forbes' now-defunct "Best of the Web" directory from 2001 onward; the directory cited its "Depth of military information", and noted its "collection of satellite images and video footage from the war zone".[26][27] In his 2004 book Plan of Attack, about the behind-the-scenes decision-making that led the Bush administration to invade Iraq, Bob Woodward called the website "an invaluable resource on military, intelligence and national security matters".[36]

References[edit]

  1. ^ O'Rourke, Ciara (November 15, 2010). "Sen. John Cornyn says that Fort Hood is the largest military installation in the world". PolitiFact. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  2. ^ Bender, Bryan (March 3, 2013). "Defense cut damage viewed as overblown". Boston Globe. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  3. ^ Defence Journal, Volume 8, Issues 8-10. 2005. p. 19.
  4. ^ a b Yester, Katherine (November 18, 2009). "Expert Sitings: John E. Pike". Foreign Policy. Retrieved April 26, 2018.
  5. ^ "Enemy at the gates". The Economist. November 19, 2015. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  6. ^ Tsuruoka, Doug (May 18, 2017). "Was Trump's NSC aide sidelined for being too hardline?". Asia Times. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  7. ^ "Splashing, and clashing, in murky waters". The Economist. August 20, 2009. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  8. ^ Leary, Warren E. (September 20, 2005). "NASA Planning Return to Moon Within 13 Years". New York Times. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  9. ^ a b Buncombe, Andrew (July 19, 2017). "Trump 'ends programme to arm anti-Assad rebels' in move sought by Russia". The Independent. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  10. ^ Cowen, Tyler (November 18, 2007). "What Does Iraq Cost? Even More Than You Think". Washington Post. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  11. ^ Sherman, Amy (July 20, 2016). "Donald Trump wrongly blames Hillary Clinton for creation of ISIS". PolitiFact. Retrieved May 12, 2018.
  12. ^ Hennigan, W.J.; Vartabedian, Ralph (May 30, 2017). "Upgrading U.S. nuclear missiles, as Russia and China modernize, would cost $85 billion. Is it time to quit the ICBM race?". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved May 12, 2018.
  13. ^ Gladstone, Rick (May 31, 2017). "Iran Drops Plan to Send Human Into Space, Citing Cost". New York Times. Retrieved May 12, 2018.
  14. ^ Broder, Jonathan (February 5, 2016). "Will Obama Bonb ISIS In Libya?". Newsweek. Retrieved May 12, 2018.
  15. ^ "Satellite spotters glimpse secrets, and tell them". CNET. February 12, 2008. Retrieved May 12, 2018.
  16. ^ Sacknoff, Scott (2004). North American Space Directory. Space Publications. p. 258.
  17. ^ Aftergood, Steven (November–December 2000). "Pike Departs to Found New Organization". Journal of the Federation of American Scientists. 53 (6). Retrieved April 26, 2018.
  18. ^ Wayne, Leslie (February 5, 2006). "A Bold Plan to Go Where Men Have Gone Before". New York Times. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  19. ^ a b c d e Watson, Cynthia Ann (2002). U.S. National Security: A Reference Handbook. ABC-CLIO. p. 231.
  20. ^ Sherwell, Philip (June 25, 2011). "US military leaders fear Afghanistan withdrawal will increase soldier deaths". The Telegraph. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  21. ^ "Libraries: Political Science: International Politics". University of St. Thomas. Retrieved April 28, 2018.
  22. ^ "Research Guides: Intelligence and Counter-Intelligence: News and Information Portals". University of Southern California. Retrieved April 28, 2018.
  23. ^ "Site Map". GlobalSecurity.org. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  24. ^ a b c Burden, Paul R. (2010). A Subject Guide to Quality Web Sites. Scarecrow Press. p. 749.
  25. ^ Netzley, Patricia D. (2007). Terrorism. Greenhaven Press. p. 347.
  26. ^ a b "Best of The Web: Website reviews: GlobalSecurity.org". Forbes.com. Archived from the original on December 3, 2001.
  27. ^ a b "Best of the Web: Web Site Reviews: GlobalSecurity.org". Forbes.com. Archived from the original on September 2, 2011.
  28. ^ a b Umansky, Eric (September 22, 2002). "Image Problems; A Place to Find Out for Yourself About the War". New York Times. Retrieved April 27, 2018.
  29. ^ Watson, Cynthia Ann (2008). Nation-building and Stability Operations: A Reference Handbook. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 134.
  30. ^ Gerstein, Josh (October 15, 2001). "Military Secrets Posted on Internet". ABC News. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  31. ^ Foley, Michael S.; O'Malley, Brendan P. (2008). Home Fronts: A Wartime America Reader. New Press. p. 574.
  32. ^ Giles, Bob (December 15, 2002). "The Vital Role of the Press in a Time of National Crisis". Nieman Reports. 56 (4). Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  33. ^ Chatterjee, Pratap (June 9, 2004). "Controversial Commando Wins Iraq Contract". CorpWatch. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  34. ^ Scheeres, Julia (October 25, 2001). "Suppression Stifles Some Sites". Wired. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  35. ^ Hunt, Kimberly N., ed. (2004). Encyclopedia of Associations, Volume 1: National Organizations of the U.S. (41st ed.). Thomson Gale. p. 1899.
  36. ^ Woodward, Bob (2004). Plan of Attack. Simon and Schuster. p. 446.

External links[edit]