Gold Coast Marathon

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Gold Coast Marathon
DateJuly
LocationGold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Event typeRoad
DistanceMarathon, half marathon
Primary sponsorVillage Roadshow Theme Parks
Established1979 (42 years ago) (1979)
Course recordsMen's: 2:07:50 (2019)
Japan Yuta Shitara
Women's: 2:24:49 (2018)
Kenya Ruth Chebitok
Official siteGold Coast Marathon
Participants5,769 (2019)

The Gold Coast Marathon is an annual road marathon on the Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia, first held in 1979. Marketed as "Australia's premier road race",[1] the marathon is the only race in Australia to hold World Athletics Label status.[2] The marathon is held on the first Sunday of July each year, with other races held the day before.

The men's course record of 2:07:50 hours was set by Yuta Shitara in 2019, while Ruth Chebitok is the women's course record holder with her run of 2:24:49 hours in 2018.[3][4]

History[edit]

The inaugural Gold Coast Marathon was held on 2 September 1979 in the suburb of Evandale as part of a health awareness campaign for the Gold Coast. It started and ended at the Evandale Civic Centre and consisted of six laps over Chevron Island Bridge, through Surfers Paradise and over the Isle of Capri Bridge. There were 124 competitors in the marathon, 144 competitors in the half marathon and 423 competitors in an additional fun run. The winning male and female were Eric Sigmont from Victoria and Mary Murison from Lismore.[5][6]

The 2020 edition of the race was cancelled due to the coronavirus pandemic, with all registrants receiving refunds.[a][8][7] Four days before the scheduled event, the 2021 edition of the race was cancelled due to a three-day snap lockdown in parts of Queensland, including the Gold Coast, that was announced earlier that day.[9][10][11][b] The lockdown would have ended hours before the start of the event, which would have made attempting to hold the event impractical.[12]

Winners[edit]

Key:    Course record (in bold)

Ed. Year Men's winner Time[c] Women's winner Time[c] Rf.
1 1979 Australia Eric Sigmont 2:28:44 Australia Mary Murison 2:58:17
2 1980 Australia Andrew Lloyd 2:23:02 Australia Mary Murison 2:58:33
3 1981 Australia Rod Lyons 2:24:04 Australia Margaret Reddan 2:58:33
4 1982 New Caledonia Alain Lazare 2:19:21 Australia Jill Colwell 2:43:25
5 1983 Australia Laurie Adams 2:16:22 Australia Rhonda Bushby 2:49:17
6 1984 Australia Pat Carroll 2:23:16 Australia Margaret Reddan 2:57:13
7 1985 Australia Pat Carroll 2:17:10 Australia Margaret Reddan 2:54:55
8 1986 Australia Peter Mitchell 2:14:59 Australia Margaret Reddan 2:47:09
9 1987 Australia Laurie Adams 2:18:24 Australia Janet McAfee 2:54:22
10 1988 Australia Pat Carroll 2:10:44 New Zealand Ngaire Drake 2:39:25
11 1989 Australia Brad Camp 2:10:11 Australia Jan Fedrick 2:51:30
12 1990 Australia Allan Carman 2:15:15 Japan Hiromi Satoyama 2:40:57
13 1991 Japan Shinji Kawashima 2:14:01 Australia Jackie Hallam 2:36:23
14 1992 Japan Katsumi Kitajima 2:14:14 Japan Mari Tanagawa 2:35:45
15 1993 Australia Sean Quilty 2:15:31 Japan Erico Asai 2:29:29
16 1994 Japan Hajime Nakatomi 2:15:05 Japan Yuko Yamazoe 2:43:20
17 1995 Australia Roderic De Highden 2:13:59 Australia Julie Rose 2:38:42
18 1996 Australia Magnus Michelsson 2:20:20 Australia Sylvia Rose 2:40:17
19 1997 Australia Pat Carroll 2:11:21 Australia Susan Hobson 2:32:43
20 1998 Kenya Fred Kiprop 2:11:15 Estonia Jane Salumäe 2:33:34
21 1999 Kenya Fred Kiprop 2:14:02 Japan Hiromi Igarishi 2:35:19
22 2000 Kenya Joseph Kahugu 2:16:39 Australia Samantha Hughes 2:44:04
23 2001 New Zealand Phil Costley 2:13:36 Japan Yuko Arimori 2:35:40
24 2002 Australia Rod de Highden 2:15:22 Japan Saori Kawai 2:37:48
25 2003 Tanzania Dickson Marwa 2:12:53 New Zealand Shireen Crumpton 2:40:10
26 2004 Australia Gemechu Woyecha 2:15:47 Australia Anna Thompson 2:40:53
27 2005 Tanzania Dickson Marwa 2:16:10 Australia Jackie Fairweather 2:34:42
28 2006 Australia Lee Troop 2:14:13 Australia Jennifer Gillard 2:41:06
29 2007 Japan Toyokazu Yoshimura 2:20:07 Japan Ayumi Hayashi 2:33:22
30 2008 Japan Kazuo Ietani 2:14:17 New Zealand Shireen Crumpton 2:38:16
31 2009 Kenya William Chebor 2:11:58 Australia Lauren Shelley 2:42:22
32 2010 Kenya James Mbugua 2:13:53 Japan Kaori Yoshida 2:31:33
33 2011 Kenya Nicholas Kamakya 2:10:01 Ethiopia Goitetom Haftu 2:30:08
34 2012 Ethiopia Alemayehu Shumye 2:10:35 Japan Kaori Yoshida 2:30:36
35 2013 Japan Yuki Kawauchi 2:10:01 Japan Yukiko Akaba 2:27:17
36 2014 Kenya Silah Limo 2:09:14 Japan Asami Kato 2:28:51
37 2015 Kenya Kenneth Mungara 2:08:42 Japan Risa Takenaka 2:28:25 [13]
38 2016 Kenya Kenneth Mungara 2:09:00 Japan Misato Horie [jp; de] 2:26:40 [13]
39 2017 Japan Takuya Noguchi [jp] 2:08:59 Ethiopia Abebech Bekele 2:25:34 [13]
40 2018 Kenya Kenneth Mungara 2:09:49 Kenya Ruth Chebitok 2:24:49 [13]
41 2019 Japan Yuta Shitara 2:07:50 Kenya Rodah Tanui 2:27:56 [13]
cancelled in 2020 and 2021 due to coronavirus pandemic [8][10]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Registrants who paid by credit card would receive refunds automatically (minus credit card fees), while other registrants would receive a full refund via direct deposit after supplying bank details.[7]
  2. ^ The lockdown was announced in response to an unvaccinated hospital worker who had been travelling throughout Queensland while she was potentially infectious for over a week.[11]
  3. ^ a b h:m:s

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About the Gold Coast Airport Marathon". Archived from the original on 18 December 2014. Retrieved 18 December 2014.
  2. ^ https://archive.is/20210317011653/https://www.worldathletics.org/competitions/world-athletics-label-road-races/calendar/2021
  3. ^ "IAAF: Mungara takes third Gold Coast Marathon victory while Chebitok sets race record- News - iaaf.org". iaaf.org. Retrieved 14 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Yuta Shitara sets race record in Gold Coast Marathon victory". Japan Times. Retrieved 14 July 2019.
  5. ^ History of the Gold Coast Marathon: 1979 Archived 14 September 2016 at the Wayback Machine
  6. ^ https://archive.is/20210629200123/https://goldcoastmarathon.com.au/about/history/1979-1988/
  7. ^ a b https://web.archive.org/web/20200520000502/https://goldcoastmarathon.com.au/faq-2/
  8. ^ a b https://archive.is/20200519235847/https://goldcoastmarathon.com.au/2020/05/20/event-update/
  9. ^ https://archive.is/20210629101553/https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-29/gold-coast-marathon-2021-cancelled-covid19-lockdown/100252572
  10. ^ a b https://archive.is/20210629054137/https://goldcoastmarathon.com.au/
  11. ^ a b https://archive.is/20210629112828/https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/2021/jun/29/queensland-covid-update-annastacia-palaszczuk-furious-as-unvaccinated-hospital-worker-tests-positive
  12. ^ https://archive.is/20210629054158/https://www.mygc.com.au/breaking-gold-coast-marathon-cancelled-due-to-lockdown/
  13. ^ a b c d e https://archive.is/20210629191654/https://goldcoastmarathon.com.au/winners/

External links[edit]