Gold Nugget

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Mango 'Gold Nugget'
Mango ATAULFO GOLD NUGGET Asit.jpg
Comparison of Ataulfo (left) and Gold Nugget (right)
Genus Mangifera
Hybrid parentage 'Kent' x unknown
Cultivar 'Gold Nugget'
Origin Florida, USA

The 'Gold Nugget' mango (or, Golden Nugget) is a named mango cultivar that originated in south Florida.

History[edit]

The original tree was grown by Edward F. Mitchell of Miami, Florida. Saigon was thought to possibly be one of the parents of 'Gold Nugget', but a 2005 pedigree analysis indicated that 'Gold Nugget' was likely an offspring of the 'Kent' mango.[1] Mitchell patented the 'Gold Nugget' in February 1990, which was plant patent number 77158.[2]

The fruit was recognized for its flavor and heavy production characteristics. 'Gold Nugget' is now grown on a small, limited commercial scale in Florida, and is sold as a home dooryard tree by nurseries in the state.

'Gold Nugget' trees are planted in the collections of the USDA's germplasm repository in Miami[3] and the Miami-Dade Fruit and Spice Park in Homestead, Florida.[4]

Description[edit]

The skin of the fruit turns yellow orange at maturity, sometimes with some pink blush. The flesh is yellow and virtually fiberless, with a mild sweet flavor, and contains a monoembryonic seed.[5] It is usually of oval shape and weighs under a pound. 'Gold Nugget' fruit typically matures from late-July to August in Florida.

The tree is a vigorous grower with an open canopy.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2010-06-18. Retrieved 2010-05-08. 
  2. ^ http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect2=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsearch-bool.html&r=1&f=G&l=50&d=PALL&RefSrch=yes&Query=PN%2FPP07158
  3. ^ http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/acc/display.pl?1650954 USDA, ARS, National Genetic Resources Program. Germplasm Resources Information Network - (GRIN). [Online Database] National Germplasm Resources Laboratory, Beltsville, Maryland.
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-07-11. Retrieved 2010-11-14. 
  5. ^ Campbell, Richard J. (1992). A Guide to Mangos in Florida. Fairchild Tropical Garden. p. 69. ISBN 0-9632264-0-1.