Golden Kamuy

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Golden Kamuy
The cover art shows Sugimoto, a man carrying a firearm equipped with a bayonet, in front of flames.
Volume 1 cover, featuring Sugimoto
ゴールデンカムイ
(Gōruden Kamui)
Genre
Manga
Written bySatoru Noda
Published byShueisha
English publisher
ImprintYoung Jump Comics
MagazineWeekly Young Jump
DemographicSeinen
Original runAugust 21, 2014 – present
Volumes26 (List of volumes)
Anime television series
Directed byHitoshi Nanba
Takahiro Kawakoshi (assistant)
Written byNoboru Takagi
Music byKenichiro Suehiro
StudioGeno Studio
Licensed by
Original networkTokyo MX, ytv, STV, BS11
English network
Original run April 9, 2018 December 21, 2020
Episodes36 + 4 OVA (List of episodes)
Original net animation
Golden Dōga Gekijō
Directed byKenshirō Morii
Studio
  • DMM.futureworks
  • W-Toon Studio
Released April 16, 2018 December 14, 2020
Episodes33 + 3 OVA (List of episodes)
Wikipe-tan face.svg Anime and manga portal

Golden Kamuy (Japanese: ゴールデンカムイ, Hepburn: Gōruden Kamui) is a Japanese manga series written and illustrated by Satoru Noda. The story follows Saichi Sugimoto, a veteran of the early twentieth century Russo-Japanese War, and his quest to find a huge fortune of gold of the Ainu people, helped by a young Ainu girl named Asirpa. The Ainu language in the story is supervised by Hiroshi Nakagawa, an Ainu language linguist from Chiba University. The manga won the ninth Manga Taishō award in 2016.

An anime television series adaptation by Geno Studio aired with two seasons from April to December 2018. A third season aired from October to December 2020.

The series has been licensed for an English-language release by Viz Media in 2016.

Plot[edit]

Background[edit]

Golden Kamuy takes place in the aftermath of the Russo-Japanese War, primarily in Hokkaido and the surrounding regions, detailing the many real-life political, technological and cultural developments of the era; several key parts of the series, such as the character Hijikata Toshizō, are fictionalized versions of real-life people and events. Specific focus is given to the indigenous Ainu people and their culture, such as exploring their language and the way they respectfully use all parts of nature to thank the Kamuy that they believe provide them. Later parts of the story also explore the different subcultures within the Ainu, and the hardships they suffered by being caught in Japanese-Russian territorial conflicts. The plot also explores the severe struggles of soldiers and war veterans, with moral ambiguity, survivor's guilt, honour, penance and virtue ethics being common themes.

The central MacGuffin comes from an in-universe tall tale of a gold discovery by a group of Ainu miners, said to have yielded 20 Kan[a] of gold[b] that ended with one man murdering the others. Hiding the gold and racing to tell his comrades, the survivor was discovered and captured by Japanese authorities who falsely claimed his execution and hid him in Abashiri Prison, hoping to torture the location out of him. Hobbled and watched closely to stop him escaping or communicating with the outside world, the survivor tattooed many parts of a ciphered map onto his fellow prisoners, offering them a cut of the gold for sharing it with his comrades outside. Eventually recognizing but unable to read the code, the prison attempted to transport the tattooed men elsewhere, only for the convicts to overpower and kill their captors before scattering into the night.

Premise[edit]

Saichi Sugimoto, a veteran of the Battle of 203 Hill, works as a panner in Hokkaido in order to provide for the widow of his dead comrade. Sugimoto is approached by a drunk old man, who tells him a dubious legend of gold that can only be found by following a map of tattoos, ones located on a group of convicts who escaped Abashiri Prison. Laughing off the story as a tall tale, Sugimoto wakes the next day to find the old man pointing his gun at him, apologizing for saying too much. Overpowering the old man, Sugimoto pursues him into the woods, only to find him disemboweled by a bear and with a large map tattoo across his chest, back and shoulders. Saved from the bear by a young Ainu girl named Asirpa, Sugimoto realizes the story is true and suggests they recover the Ainu gold together; Asirpa is uninterested in the gold but wants vengeance for her father, one of the Ainu miners who was betrayed.

Examining the body, they realize by the tattoos have seams, meaning that the prisoners were always intended to be murdered and skinned; due to her opposition to needless killing, Asirpa suggests they try to co-operate with prisoners they find by simply tracing their tattoos. Soon recruiting Shiraishi, an escape artist and tattooed convict, Sugimoto's group soon finds themselves in conflicts with First Lieutenant Tsurumi, the insane leader of the 7th Division, and Hijikata, who is touted as the last living samurai. Due to the significant allure of the gold, as well as the traitorous nature of multiple parties, each group routinely forms and betrays truces to prevent any one party collecting all tattoos and deciphering the map.

Media[edit]

Manga[edit]

Golden Kamuy is written and illustrated by Satoru Noda. It began serialization in Shueisha's Weekly Young Jump magazine on August 21, 2014.[4] In May 2021, it was announced that the manga entered its climax.[5] The series has been collected into 26 tankōbon volumes as of June 2021.[6] Viz Media announced that they licensed the manga at New York Comic Con 2016,[7] and they have been releasing volumes in North America since June 2017.[8]

Anime[edit]

The first opening theme is performed by Man with a Mission.

The anime television series adaptation is produced by Geno Studio. It is directed by Hitoshi Nanba and written by Noboru Takagi,[9] with music by Kenichiro Suehiro, art direction by Atsushi Morikawa, and CG direction by Yuuko Okumura and Yasutaka Hamada.[10] Kenichi Ohnuki is adapting the character designs for animation,[9] while Koji Watanabe designs firearms, Shinya Anasuma designs the props, and Ryō Sumiyoshi designs the animals.[10] The series' opening theme, "Winding Road", is performed by Man with a Mission, and the ending theme, "Hibana" is performed by The Sixth Lie.[11] Like with the manga, Hiroshi Nakagawa, an Ainu language linguist from Chiba University, works on the anime as an Ainu language supervisor.[10]

The anime was announced in July 2017 in Weekly Young Jump,[12] and aired for twelve episodes starting from April 9 to June 25, 2018 on Tokyo MX, ytv, STV, and BS11.[11][13] Golden Dōga Gekijō, a series of 25-second animated shorts based on extras included in the Golden Kamuy manga volumes and Weekly Young Jump, is directed by Kenshirō Morii and produced at DMM.futureworks and W-Toon Studio. It premiered on April 16, 2018 online.[14]

At the conclusion of the first season broadcast, a second season was announced and aired from October 8 to December 24, 2018.[15][16] The second season's opening theme, "Reimei", is performed by Sayuri and My First Story, and the ending theme, "Tokeidai no Kane" is performed by Eastern Youth.[17][18]

On July 7, 2019, it was announced that the series will receive a third season.[19] On March 13, 2020, it was announced that the third season would premiere in October 2020.[20] The season aired from October 5 to December 21, 2020 for 12 episodes.[21] The third season's opening theme, "Grey," is performed by Fomare, and the ending theme "Yūsetsu", is performed by The Sixth Lie.[22][23]

The first season of the series was released across three DVD and Blu-ray volumes in Japan, starting in July 2018; they had originally been planned to release starting in June, but were delayed one month to allow for improvements to the footage compared to the TV broadcast version. The Japanese home video volumes include the Golden Dōga Gekijō Youtube shorts, including episodes that are exclusive to the video release.[24] An original video animation (OVA) based on the manga's "Barato" arc was released on DVD in a bundle with the manga's 15th Japanese volume on September 19, 2018.[25] A second OVA was released with the manga's 17th Japanese volume on March 19, 2019.[26] A third OVA based on the manga's "Monster" arc was released with the manga's 19th Japanese volume on September 19, 2019.[27] A fourth OVA based on the manga's "Shiton Animal Record" arc was bundled with the 23rd manga volume on September 18, 2020.

The TV series is simulcast on Crunchyroll, and an English dub started streaming on Funimation starting on April 30, 2018.[28][29] Crunchyroll streamed the third season in North America, Central America, South America, Europe, Africa, Oceania, the Middle East, and the Commonwealth of Independent States.[30] Funimation streamed the third season with an English dub later.[31]

Reception[edit]

Golden Kamuy had 5 million copies in print as of April 2018.[32] It charted on the Oricon Japanese Comics Rankings for the week of April 18–24, 2016, with volume seven placing eighth place.[33] By June 19, 2019, the date that manga Volume 18 was released, the total number of copies printed had reached 10 million.[34]

The series won the ninth Manga Taishō award in 2016.[35] It was nominated for the 20th and 21st annual Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize in 2016 and 2017,[36][37] and won the 22nd in 2018 in the Grand Prize category.[38] It was also nominated for the 40th Kodansha Manga Award in the general category,[39] and for an Eisner Award for best US edition of an Asian comic.[40] It was ranked second in the 2016 edition of the Kono Manga ga Sugoi! list for male readers.[41] The series won the Social Impact Award at the 24th Japan Media Arts Festival in 2021.[42]

The British Museum in London used an image of the character Asirpa to promote its manga exhibit, which ran from May 23 to August 26, 2019.[43]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ ^ 112.5 kg or 248 lbs
  2. ^ ^ Valued in the 2014 manga at around JP¥800m, approximately US$7.7m

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Official Website for Golden Kamuy". Viz Media. Archived from the original on August 15, 2017. Retrieved January 18, 2018.
  2. ^ "Golden Kamuy Vol. 1 – The Spring 2017 Manga Guide". Anime News Network. June 3, 2017. Retrieved July 28, 2018.
  3. ^ "マンガ大賞2016受賞『ゴールデンカムイ』は、8年ぶり2度めの"異変"だった". Livedoor News (in Japanese). Line Corporation. March 31, 2016. Archived from the original on September 17, 2017. Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  4. ^ 野田サトルの一攫千金サバイバル、YJで始動. Natalie (in Japanese). August 21, 2014. Retrieved September 10, 2019.
  5. ^ Mateo, Alex (May 6, 2021). "Golden Kamuy Manga Enters Climax". Anime News Network. Retrieved May 6, 2021.
  6. ^ ゴールデンカムイ 26 (in Japanese). Shueisha. Retrieved June 19, 2021.
  7. ^ "Viz Licenses Tokyo Ghoul:re, Vampire Knight Memories, Golden Kamuy Manga". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on 2016-10-08. Retrieved 2016-10-08.
  8. ^ "Golden Kamuy, Vol. 1". Viz Media. Retrieved October 14, 2017.
  9. ^ a b "Fate/Grand Order's Hitoshi Nanba Directs Golden Kamuy Anime at Geno Studio". Anime News Network. October 16, 2017. Archived from the original on October 16, 2017. Retrieved October 16, 2017.
  10. ^ a b c "Golden Kamuy Anime's 1st Promo Video Reveals April Premiere". Anime News Network. December 13, 2017. Archived from the original on December 15, 2017. Retrieved December 14, 2017.
  11. ^ a b Hodkins, Crystalyn (April 2, 2018). "Golden Kamuy Anime Listed with 12 Episodes". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on April 2, 2018. Retrieved April 2, 2018.
  12. ^ "Satoru Noda's Golden Kamuy Manga Gets TV Anime". Anime News Network. July 31, 2017. Archived from the original on July 31, 2017. Retrieved July 31, 2017.
  13. ^ Chapman, Paul (March 5, 2018). "Golden Kamuy TV schedule". Crunchyroll. Otter Media. Archived from the original on March 6, 2018. Retrieved March 6, 2018.
  14. ^ Ressler, Karen (April 16, 2018). "Golden Kamuy Anime's Spinoff Short Streamed". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on April 16, 2018. Retrieved April 17, 2018.
  15. ^ "Golden Kamuy Anime Gets 2nd Season in October". Anime News Network. June 25, 2018. Retrieved June 25, 2018.
  16. ^ "Golden Kamuy Season 2 Anime Premieres on October 8". Anime News Network. August 29, 2018. Retrieved August 29, 2018.
  17. ^ Ressler, Karen (August 5, 2018). "Sayuri, My First Story Perform Opening Song for Golden Kamuy Season 2". Anime News Network. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  18. ^ Sherman, Jennifer (August 22, 2018). "eastern youth Perform Ending Song for Golden Kamuy Season 2". Anime News Network. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  19. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (July 7, 2019). "Golden Kamuy Anime Gets 3rd Season". Anime News Network. Retrieved July 7, 2019.
  20. ^ "Golden Kamuy Anime's 3rd Season Reveals October Premiere in Promo Video". Anime News Network. March 13, 2020. Retrieved March 14, 2020.
  21. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (October 8, 2020). "6 More Fall Season Anime Reveal Episode Counts". Anime News Network. Retrieved October 8, 2020.
  22. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (September 7, 2020). "Golden Kamuy Anime's 3rd Season Reveals New Promo Video, October 5 Premiere, Theme Song Artists". Anime News Network. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  23. ^ "Golden Kamuy Season 3 release date set for fall 2020: OVA 4 episode confirmed". Monsters and Critics. September 7, 2020. Retrieved September 7, 2020.
  24. ^ Pineda, Rafael Antonio (May 15, 2018). "Golden Kamuy Anime's BDs/DVDs Delayed by 1 Month Each". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on May 15, 2018. Retrieved May 15, 2018.
  25. ^ Pineda, Rafael Antonio (May 16, 2018). "Golden Kamuy Gets Original Anime DVD in September". Anime News Network. Retrieved May 17, 2018.
  26. ^ "Golden Kamuy Gets 2nd Original Video Anime With Manga's 17th Volume". AnimeNewsNetwork. November 21, 2018. Retrieved November 21, 2018.
  27. ^ "Golden Kamuy Gets 3rd Original Video Anime With 19th Manga Volume". AnimeNewsNetwork. March 13, 2019. Retrieved March 13, 2019.
  28. ^ "Funimation Announces 9 Titles for Spring Season Dub Lineup, Including Same-Day Tokyo Ghoul:re Dub". Anime News Network. March 28, 2018. Archived from the original on March 28, 2018. Retrieved March 28, 2018.
  29. ^ Ressler, Karen (April 12, 2018). "Funimation Announces Spring SimulDub Premiere Dates". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on April 16, 2018. Retrieved April 16, 2018.
  30. ^ Mateo, Alex (September 24, 2020). "Crunchyroll to Stream Iwa-Kakeru! -Sport Climbing Girls-, 'With a Dog AND a Cat, Every Day is Fun' Anime". Anime News Network. Retrieved September 24, 2020.
  31. ^ Friedman, Nicholas (September 24, 2020). "The Hunt Continues! Golden Kamuy Season 3 Comes to Funimation This Fall". Funimation. Retrieved September 24, 2020.
  32. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (May 7, 2018). "Roundup of Newly Revealed Print Counts for Manga, Light Novel Series (March – May 2018)". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on May 7, 2018. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  33. ^ "Japanese Comic Ranking, April 18–24". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on May 1, 2016. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  34. ^ Frye, Patrick (June 19, 2019). "Golden Kamuy Season 3 release date: OVA 3 and OVA 2 episodes confirmed for 2019 – Golden Kamuy manga compared to the anime and Satoru Noda interview [Spoilers for Sugimoto, Asirpa, Nopperabou]". Monsters and Critics. Retrieved June 19, 2019.
  35. ^ "Satoru Noda's Golden Kamuy Wins 9th Manga Taisho Award". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on May 4, 2016. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  36. ^ "20th Tezuka Osamu Cultural Prize Nominees Announced". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on April 30, 2016. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  37. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2018-04-25. Retrieved 2018-04-25.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  38. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2018-04-25. Retrieved 2018-04-25.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  39. ^ "40th Annual Kodansha Manga Awards' Nominees Announced". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on May 10, 2016. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  40. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2018-04-26. Retrieved 2018-04-26.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  41. ^ "Kono Manga ga Sugoi! Reveals 2016's Series Ranking for Male Readers". Anime News Network. Archived from the original on May 26, 2016. Retrieved May 9, 2016.
  42. ^ Hodgkins, Crystalyn (March 12, 2021). "Keep Your Hands Off Eizouken!, On-Gaku, March comes in like a lion Win Media Arts Awards". Anime News Network. Retrieved March 12, 2021.
  43. ^ "Manga Exhibit at British Museum from May 2019 (Updated)". Anime News Network. Retrieved 2019-09-04.

External links[edit]