Goldich dissolution series

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Discontinuous
Series
 
Continuous
Series
 
High
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Olivine
 
Plagioclase
(Calcium rich)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pyroxene
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Amphibole
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Biotite
(Black Mica)
 
Plagioclase
(Sodium rich)
 
Relative
Weathering
potential
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Orthoclase
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Muscovite
(White Mica)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Quartz
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Low
Olivine weathering to iddingsite within a mantle xenolith, a common reaction within the series

The Goldich dissolution series is a way of predicting the relative stability or weathering rate of various minerals on the Earth's surface. S. S. Goldich came up with the series in 1938[1] after studying soil profiles. He found that minerals that form at higher temperatures and pressures are less stable on the surface than minerals that form at lower temperatures and pressures.[2] This pattern follows the same pattern of the Bowen's reaction series, with the minerals that are first to crystallize also the first the undergo chemical weathering.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Goldich, S. S. (1938). "A Study in Rock Weathering". Journal of Geology. 46: 17–58. Bibcode:1938JG.....46...17G. doi:10.1086/624619. 
  2. ^ Prothero & Schwab, Donald R. & Fred (1996). Sedimentary Geology. W. H. Freeman. p. 24. ISBN 0-7167-2726-9.