Goldstone Commission

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The Goldstone Commission, formally known as the Commission of Inquiry Regarding the Prevention of Public Violence and Intimidation, was appointed to investigate political violence and intimidation that occurred between July 1991 and the 1994 general election that ended apartheid in South Africa.[1]

The Commission played a critical role in defusing the political violence that erupted when apartheid in South Africa began eroding in the late 1980s as the country moved toward its first democratic elections, and concluded that political violence was fuelled by a 'third force'.

Appointed by then president F. W. de Klerk on 24 October 1991, the commission submitted 47 reports to the State President. It was chaired by Justice Richard Goldstone, and the remaining commissioners were Adv. Danie Rossouw, SC (Vice-Chairman), Adv. Solly Sithole, Ms Lillian Baqwa, and Mr Gert Steyn.

Notable reports were on the violence affecting Crossroads, and Nyanga[2] and the Storming of the Kempton Park World Trade Centre.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Commission of Inquiry Regarding the Prevention of Public Violence and Intimidation (Goldstone Commission), Human Rights Institute of South Africa, archived from the original on 6 January 2010, retrieved 27 May 2010 
  2. ^ Goldstone Commission : Report on Violence at Crossroads, African National Congress, archived from the original on 8 July 2008, retrieved 27 May 2010 
  3. ^ Goldstone Commission : Events at the World Trade Centre June 1993, African National Congress, archived from the original on 14 July 2007, retrieved 27 May 2010