Gonzales v. United States

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Gonzales v. United States
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued February 1–2, 1955
Decided March 14, 1955
Full case name Gonzales v. United States
Citations 348 U.S. 407 (more)
75 S. Ct. 409; 99 L. Ed. 467; 1955 U.S. LEXIS 1081
Holding
A Jehovah's Witness was denied fair hearing because of failure to supply him with materials in his record.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Clark, joined by Warren, Black, Frankfurter, Douglas, and Harlan
Dissent Reed, joined by Burton
Dissent Minton
Laws applied
Universal Military Training and Service Act

Gonzales v. United States, 348 U.S. 407 (1955),[1] was a case in which the Supreme Court of the United States held that a Jehovah's Witness was denied fair hearing because of failure to supply him with materials in his record.

Facts of the case[edit]

Gonzales, a member of Jehovah's Witnesses who had claimed and had been denied conscientious objector exemption, was convicted under the Universal Military Training and Service Act for refusal to submit to induction into the armed forces.

Decision of the court[edit]

The 6-3 opinion of the court was written by Justice Clark, holding that the petitioner was entitled to receive a copy of the recommendation made by the Department of Justice to the Appeal Board under the provisions of 6 (j) of the Universal Military Training and Service Act. Justice Reed, joined by Justice Burton, and Justice Minton each filed a dissenting opinion.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 348 U.S. 407 Full text of the opinion courtesy of Findlaw.com.