Good-Bye Bad Times

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"Good-Bye Bad Times"
GoodByeBadTimes.jpg
Single by Giorgio Moroder and Philip Oakey
from the album Philip Oakey & Giorgio Moroder
Released June 1985
Format Single
Recorded 1985
Genre Synthpop, new wave
Length 3:42
Label Virgin Records
Songwriter(s) Oakey and Moroder
Producer(s) Giorgio Moroder
Philip Oakey singles chronology
"Together In Electric Dreams"
(1984)
"Good-Bye Bad Times"
(1985)
"Be My Lover Now"
(1985)
"Together In Electric Dreams"
(1984)
"Good-Bye Bad Times"
(1985)
"Be My Lover Now"
(1985)
Giorgio Moroder singles chronology
"Shannon's Eyes"
(1985) Shannon's Eyes1985
"Good-Bye Bad Times"
(1985) Good-Bye Bad Times1985
"Be My Lover Now"
(198) Be My Lover Now198
Audio sample
"Good-Bye Bad Times "

"Good-Bye Bad Times" is a song by the British singer and composer Philip Oakey and producer Giorgio Moroder. It was written by Oakey and Moroder and recorded for the album Philip Oakey & Giorgio Moroder. Released as a single in the UK in June 1985 as the follow-up to Oakey and Moroder's 1984 hit "Together In Electric Dreams"; it reached number 44 in the singles charts and remained in the charts for 5 weeks.[1] It was moderately successful in Australia, where it peaked at number 26.[2]

Virgin records had high expectations for the single but it failed to sell in the quantities forecast. Because the single was not a huge success, it didn't do much to promote the album. After a final single "Be My Lover Now" the short partnership between Oakey and Moroder effectively ended. Oakey then returned to work with his band The Human League full-time.

Music video[edit]

Philip Oakey in music video for "Good Bye Bad Times."

The music video for "Good-Bye Bad Times" was quite a high budget production as Virgin Records had high expectations for the song after the huge international success of "Together in Electric Dreams". It was filmed in black and white, directed by Steve Barron and has a Victoriana theme. It is set in 19th century London and features unrequited love between a city gent and a pretty working class girl. Oakey features inset in the early scenes and later as a singer in the background of a Music hall dressed in Victorian attire. A paradox of the video is that the modern music is completely at odds with the scenery and story board.

References[edit]

External links[edit]