Good Charlotte (album)

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Good Charlotte
Good charlotte .jpg
Studio album by
ReleasedSeptember 26, 2000
RecordedMay–June 2000
StudioEncore Studios, NRG Studios and Larrabee West, Los Angeles, California; Battery Studios, New York City
GenrePop punk
Length45:12
Label
ProducerDon Gilmore
Good Charlotte chronology
GC EP
(2000)
Good Charlotte
(2000)
The Young and the Hopeless
(2002)
Singles from Good Charlotte
  1. "Little Things"
    Released: March 1, 2001
  2. "The Motivation Proclamation"
    Released: August 7, 2001
  3. "Festival Song"
    Released: 2002

Good Charlotte is the self-titled debut studio album by American rock band Good Charlotte, which was formed in 1996 by twin brothers Joel and Benji Madden, with the former on vocals and the latter on guitar. They were joined by Billy Martin on guitar, Paul Thomas on bass and Aaron Escolopio on drums. A demo of "Little Things" received airplay from two radio stations and by early 2000, Good Charlotte had signed to Epic Records. Recording sessions with producer Don Gilmore for their debut album took place in four studios in California and New York. The album was released on September 26, 2000, through Epic and Daylight Records, and undersold expectations. Despite receiving favorable reviews, Good Charlotte charted at number 185 on the Billboard 200. The album's first single "Little Things" reached the top 30 on the Mainstream Top 40 and the Alternative Songs charts.

A music video for "Little Things" started getting airplay in November 2000. In March 2001, "Little Things" was released as a single, which was followed by a music video for "The Motivation Proclamation". Between March and May 2001, the group went on tour with MxPx and appeared at HFStival, where a music video for "Festival Song" was filmed. After this, Escolopio left the group and was replaced by Nate Foutz of Vroom. Foutz remained with the group for six weeks before Dusty Bill replaced him. The group participated in Warped Tour between June and August. Also in August, "The Motivation Proclamation" was released as a single and was followed by "Festival Song" in 2002. The album was subsequently certified silver in the UK and gold in the US.

Background[edit]

After watching a Beastie Boys show in 1995, twin brothers Joel and Benji Madden formed Good Charlotte in Waldorf, Maryland, in 1996 with the former on vocals and the latter on guitar.[1] Following the brothers' graduation in 1997, instead of going to college they worked full-time on the band.[2] The Madden brothers focused on getting the band signed, reading books and magazines that would aid them to achieve this goal.[3] They made promotional packages and sent them to record labels.[2] Joel Madden learned that the girl he took to homecoming was a sister of bassist Paul Thomas. Thomas met the brothers and was unimpressed with their performance skills.[4] Soon afterwards, the brothers recruited their fellow high-school pupil Aaron Escolopio as a drummer[1] and began playing clubs in the D.C. metro area.[4] The Madden brothers moved to Annapolis, Maryland, and performed acoustic shows.[5]

Guitarist Billy Martin went to one of these shows at the insistence of Jimi HaHa of Jimmie's Chicken Shack.[3] Martin became friends with the Madden brothers and let them move in with him after they were evicted from their apartment.[5] Martin joined Good Charlotte after the trio learned they had a shared interest in the Australian rock band Silverchair[6] and the break up of Martin's band Overflow. They wrote new songs, and recorded and performed demos.[7] The band began building a following by performing at HFStival in 1998,[1] and support slots for Blink-182, Lit and Bad Religion.[8] In 1999, Good Charlotte opened for Save Ferris in Philadelphia. After the performance, they left a demo of "Little Things" that soon got airplay on local radio station Y100.[3] Benji Madden was certain of the song's potential hit status with its high-school theme and the reality of its lyrics.[2]

A Sony Music employee passed the band's demo to regional promotion manager Mike Martinovich, who was impressed by the group's writing ability and the autobiographical nature of the songs.[2] He contacted talent manager Steve Feinberg, who flew to Annapolis to watch the group perform and later began working with them.[7] Around the same time, WHFS also began playing the demo.[2] As the track became a hit in the area, record labels began showing interest in Good Charlotte.[3] By the end of 1999, the band went on an east-coast tour with Lit. Representatives from several major labels attended the New York City show of the tour.[9] Starting in 2000, the band became a full-time touring act, performing support slots for Lit, Goldfinger, Sum 41 and Mest.[10] Following a showcase in New York City,[3] the band meet with people in the music industry.[11] David Massey, executive vice president of A&R at Epic Records, signed the band to the label in May.[12]

Recording and composition[edit]

Good Charlotte was recorded mainly at Encore Studios in Los Angeles, California, and was produced by Don Gilmore who also acted as engineer and was assisted by Mauricio Iragorri and engineer Bob Jackson. Additional engineering was done by John Ewing Jr. Drums and bass were recorded at NRG Studios in Los Angeles with assistance from Matt Griffen[13] in May 2000.[14] Guitar and vocals were recorded in June with assistance from Paul Oliveira at Battery Studios in New York City.[13][14] Martin, Thomas and Escolopio sang additional vocals on "Little Things" while HaHa contributed additional vocals on "The Motivation Proclamation".[13]

Vocals were recorded with assistance from Pete Novack at Larrabee West, Los Angeles. Gilmore mixed most of the songs except "Little Things", "Change" and "Seasons" at Encore Studios. He mixed "Little Things" at Battery Studios. "Change", "Seasons" and "Thank You Mom" were mixed by Tom Lord-Alge at South Beach Studios in Miami, Florida. Vlado Meller mastered all of the tracks except for "Little Things" at Sony Music Studios in New York City. "Little Things" was mastered by Ted Jensen at Sterling Sound in New York City.[13]

All of the songs on Good Charlotte were written by the Madden brothers. Josh Ian wrote additional lyrics for "Seasons" and "Let Me Go".[13] The album has been classified as pop punk.[15] "Little Things" makes reference to the Madden brothers' upbringing with their parents. One of the lines mentions their father abandoning them, which made Joel Madden uncomfortable. Benji Madden reasoned it worked within the context of the song. "Waldorfworldwide" is about the brothers' ambition and frustration; according to Joel Madden it was written when they had no money.[2] According to Martin, "The Motivation Proclamation" talks about "breaking out of a cycle if you're depressed on something ... getting over it and going on".[16] Joel Madden wrote "Festival Song", which is about attending HFStival, a festival he grew up with.[17]

Release[edit]

Good Charlotte was released on September 26, 2000,[18] through Epic and Daylight Records.[13] The Japanese edition included "The Click", a cover of Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark's "If You Leave" and a live, acoustic version of "The Motivation Proclamation" as bonus tracks.[19] Sales of the album did not meet the label's expectations and the group were nearly dropped from Epic.[20] In October and November 2000, the group embarked on a US tour with Fenix TX,[21] and another with MxPx that lasted until the end of the year.[22] Also in November 2000, a music video for "Little Things" began receiving airplay on MTV.[2] The video was filmed in Canada and was directed by Nigel Dick[23] It depicts the band as troublemakers in high school; Joel Madden breaks into the principle's office and talks into a microphone[24] addressing "Waldorf High School".[2] The principle finds out and is angry with the band. He follows the microphone cable into the gym to find out who is causing trouble. The group are shown walking down a halfway and performing on a golf cart. Singer Mandy Moore, who appears as Madden's girlfriend in the video, is then seen.[25] The clip ends with an impromptu concert in the gym.[26]

In December, Good Charlotte appeared at HFSmas, the winter edition of HFStival.[27] On March 1, 2001, "Little Things" was released as a single in Australia.[28] The CD version includes "The Click" and "Thank You Mom" as extra tracks.[29] Despite the lack of success of "Little Things", Epic allowed the band to make a video for "The Motivation Proclamation".[30] The video was directed by Marc Webb;[23] it depicts the band members lying on the ground, waking up one-by-one and beginning to playing together. Scenes from Undergrads are shown being played on a television.[31] Between March and May 2001, the group supported MxPx on their headlining US tour.[32] In April, the video for "The Motivation Proclamation" received airplay on video outlets.[8] While on the MxPx tour, Good Charlotte was consistently selling 3,000 copies per week. As a result, the group wanted to make a live music video.[33] At the end of May, the group performed at HFStival. During their set, a music video for "Festival Song" was filmed;[17] it was directed by Webb.[23] The video is a mini-documentary about the day.[34] Members of Mest, New Found Glory and Linkin Park appear in the video.[35]

Sometime afterwards, Escolopio left the group[1] to join his brother's band Wakefield.[36] He was replaced by Nate Foutz of Vroom, who left the group after six weeks because Vroom signed a major label deal.[37] Two days before the band went on tour,[38] Dusty Bill was hired to play drums.[36] The band gave him a copy of Good Charlotte and the following day, began practicing with him.[38] Between June and August 2001, Good Charlotte appeared on the Warped Tour.[39] Between tour performances, the group performed at Y100 FEZtival.[40]

On August 7, 2001, "The Motivation Proclamation" was released as a single.[41] Following this, the band supported Blink-182 on their US tour before embarking on a tour of Australia in October.[42] The group closed the year with a US headlining tour called the Uniting the States Tour, with support from Mest and the Movielife.[43] In 2002, "Festival Song" was released as a single.[44] In September 2004, the album was reissued as a two-CD package with The Young and the Hopeless (2002).[45] It was reissued again in January 2010 in a box set alongside The Young and the Hopeless, The Chronicles of Life and Death (2004) and Good Morning Revival (2007).[46]

Reception[edit]

Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic3/5 stars[47]
Chart AttackFavorable[48]
Entertainment WeeklyA-[49]
Melodic3.5/5 stars [50]
The Morning CallUnfavorable [51]

Critical reception[edit]

AllMusic reviewer William Ruhlmann said, "The beats come fast and furious, the simple guitar chords noisily fill the middle range, and the vocals are sung with snotty belligerence".[47] He also said the lyrics touch upon "standard-issue stuff" with the only oddity being "an occasionally expressed religious interest".[47] Chart Attack wrote that the group sounds "so much like a cross between Eve 6 and Lit that it's frightening".[48] The website said Good Charlotte is "energized with angsty teenage punk, and though the lyrics are cynical, the music is peppy and autobiographical".[48] David Hiltbrand of Entertainment Weekly said "crosscurrents of anger and optimism" appear throughout the album,[49] and that the band has an "astringent punk style" combined with "crafty pop underpinnings".[49]

Melodic writer Johan Wippsson praised Gilmore's "very nice" production and called the record a "very nice punk-pop album with no really bad song".[50] His only complaint was the lyrics, which he found to be a "little bit to [sic] teenaged" at times.[50] The Morning Call reviewer Joe Warminsky said the group "spares nothing in its effort" to join its contemporaries "of lame pop-rock bands that populate non-hip-hop radio".[51] He said the album "wears thin quickly" and that most of the songs are "just plain shameless".[51]

Commercial performance and legacy[edit]

Good Charlotte charted at number one on the Catalog Albums chart,[52] number 13 on the Heatseekers Albums chart[53] and number 185 on the Billboard 200.[54] It also reached number 12 in New Zealand[55] and number 194 in the UK.[56] It was later certified silver in the UK[57] and gold in the US.[58] "Little Things" charted in the US at number 23 on both the Mainstream Top 40[59] and Alternative Songs charts.[60] The album charted in Australia at number 61.[61] "The Motivation Proclamation" charted in Australia at number 78.[62]

"Little Things", "The Motivation Proclamation" and "Festival Song" were included on the band's Greatest Hits (2010) compilation.[63] Rolling Stone ranked the album at number 46 on their list of the 50 Greatest Pop-Punk Albums.[64] In 2016, Benji Madden said of the album; "We were young and excited kids who were full of dreams and still trying to figure out our musical identity".[65] Later that year, Joel Madden said; "[W]e didn’t over-think the pre-chorus, we didn’t think how we could make the bridge bigger, we wrote the songs until they were done. It’s more raw; the hope, the vibe and the spirit of that hopefulness has returned to the music."[66]

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Benji and Joel Madden. Additional lyrics on "Let Me Go" and "Seasons" by Josh Ian.[13]

No.TitleLength
1."Little Things"3:23
2."Waldorfworldwide"3:21
3."The Motivation Proclamation"3:36
4."East Coast Anthem"2:27
5."Festival Song"3:00
6."Complicated"2:49
7."Seasons"3:15
8."I Don't Wanna Stop"2:41
9."I Heard You"2:43
10."Walk By"2:42
11."Let Me Go"3:01
12."Screamer"3:36
13."Change" (includes hidden track "Thank You Mom")8:38
Total length:45:12

Personnel[edit]

Personnel per booklet.[13]

Charts and certifications[edit]

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ a b c d Wilson, MacKenzie. "Good Charlotte | Biography & History". AllMusic. All Media Network, LLC. Archived from the original on September 6, 2017. Retrieved February 23, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Wartofsky, Alona (November 12, 2000). "Mastering the Geek Tragedy". The Washington Post. Fred Ryan. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. ^ a b c d e Hoard, Christian (May 1, 2003). "Good Charlotte: The Polite Punks". Rolling Stone. Jann Wenner. Archived from the original on August 16, 2017. Retrieved February 26, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  4. ^ a b Tuccillo 2007, p. 80
  5. ^ a b Small 2003, p. 16
  6. ^ Small 2003, p. 17
  7. ^ a b Freedom du Lac, J. (March 18, 2007). "A Loser Fairy Tale". The Washington Post. Fred Ryan. Archived from the original on June 29, 2018. Retrieved June 29, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  8. ^ a b D'Angelo, Joe (April 13, 2001). "Good Charlotte Off To A Good Start". MTV. Viacom. Archived from the original on February 25, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  9. ^ Small 2003, p. 21
  10. ^ Small 2003, p. 22
  11. ^ Sherman, Maria (December 10, 2015). "Good Charlotte's Second Act: Inside Madden Brothers' Pop-Punk Reawakening". Rolling Stone. Jann Wenner. Archived from the original on March 7, 2018. Retrieved June 19, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  12. ^ Small 2003, p. 23
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h Good Charlotte (Booklet). Good Charlotte. Epic/Daylight Records. 2000. EK 61452.CS1 maint: others (link)
  14. ^ a b Little Things (Sleeve). Good Charlotte. Epic Records. 2000. ESK 15175.CS1 maint: others (link)
  15. ^ Beringer, Drew (March 16, 2007). "Good Charlotte - Good Morning Revival - Album Review". AbsolutePunk. SpinMedia. Archived from the original on July 17, 2012. Retrieved February 26, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  16. ^ Good Charlotte 2003, event occurs at 13:49–55
  17. ^ a b Nome, Valerie (May 29, 2001). "Staind, Green Day, Tantric, More Rock D.C.'s HFStival". MTV. Viacom. Archived from the original on February 22, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  18. ^ "Good Charlotte - Good Charlotte | Release Info". AllMusic. All Media Network, LLC. Archived from the original on February 26, 2018. Retrieved February 26, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  19. ^ Good Charlotte (Booklet). Good Charlotte. Epic Records. 2001. EICP 210.CS1 maint: others (link)
  20. ^ Rock Sound (November 2012). "Hall of Fame: Good Charlotte, The Young & The Hopeless". Rock Sound. Freeway Press Inc. Archived from the original on February 13, 2015. Retrieved February 13, 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  21. ^ "Shows". Good Charlotte. Archived from the original on November 10, 2000. Retrieved June 29, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  22. ^ Small 2003, p. 37
  23. ^ a b c Video Collection (Sleeve). Good Charlotte. Epic/Daylight Records. 2003. EPC 201883 9.CS1 maint: others (link)
  24. ^ Good Charlotte 2003, event occurs at 5:07–16
  25. ^ Good Charlotte 2003, event occurs at 5:24–26, 5:30–44, 6:19–20, 6:43–44
  26. ^ Small 2003, p. 28
  27. ^ Tripwire (December 14, 2000). "HFSmas Nutcracker 2000 Review". The Fader. Andy Cohn. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved February 23, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  28. ^ "News". Good Charlotte. Archived from the original on August 14, 2003. Retrieved February 23, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  29. ^ "Good Charlotte - Little Things". Australian-charts. Hung Medien. Archived from the original on April 14, 2016. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  30. ^ Good Charlotte 2003, event occurs at 12:55–13:07
  31. ^ Good Charlotte 2003, event occurs at 14:04, 14:08–12, 15:26–41
  32. ^ Small 2003, p. 38
  33. ^ Good Charlotte 2003, event occurs at 19:23–30, 19:45
  34. ^ Good Charlotte 2003, event occurs at 20:34–35
  35. ^ Good Charlotte 2003, event occurs at 22:56–23:02
  36. ^ a b McGuire, Colin (December 10, 2007). "Young and Hopeful: An Interview With Good Charlotte". PopMatters. PopMatters Media, Inc. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  37. ^ Wells, Brent (June 27, 2012). "Former Vroom and Good Charlotte drummer finds new niche in Hill City". The News & Advance. Bob MacPherson. Archived from the original on February 25, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  38. ^ a b Small 2003, p. 42
  39. ^ Vanhorn, Teri (March 13, 2001). "Warped Tour Adds Rollins Band, Lists Dates, Cities". MTV. Viacom. Archived from the original on February 26, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  40. ^ Tripwire (June 6, 2001). "Y100 Locks Down FEZtival 2001 Lineup". The Fader. Andy Cohn. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved February 23, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  41. ^ "Motivation Proclamation - Good Charlotte | Release Info". AllMusic. All Media Network, LLC. Archived from the original on February 26, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  42. ^ Small 2003, p. 44
  43. ^ Small 2003, p. 46
  44. ^ Festival Song (Sleeve). Good Charlotte. Epic Records. 2002. ESK-16790.CS1 maint: others (link)
  45. ^ "Good Charlotte/The Young & the Hopeless - Good Charlotte | Release Info". AllMusic. All Media Network, LLC. Archived from the original on May 14, 2016. Retrieved February 24, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  46. ^ "Good Charlotte - Special Edition - Good Charlotte Box: Good Charlotte / The Young And The Hopeless / The Chronicles Of Life And Death / Good Morning Revival". Dutchcharts.nl. Hung Medien. Archived from the original on March 7, 2016. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  47. ^ a b c Ruhlmann, William. "Good Charlotte - Good Charlotte | Songs, Reviews, Credits". AllMusic. All Media Network, LLC. Archived from the original on August 25, 2017. Retrieved February 26, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  48. ^ a b c Chart Attack (March 27, 2001). "Good Charlotte — Good Charlotte". Chart Attack. Channel Zero. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved February 23, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  49. ^ a b c Hiltbrand, David (October 13, 2000). "Music Review: 'Good Charlotte' Review". Entertainment Weekly. Time Inc. Archived from the original on April 25, 2009. Retrieved March 12, 2012. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  50. ^ a b c Wippsson, Johan (March 25, 2002). "Good Charlotte - s/t". Melodic. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved July 17, 2017. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  51. ^ a b c Warminsky, Joe (October 7, 2000). "Good Charlotte". The Morning Call. Robert York. Archived from the original on February 25, 2018. Retrieved February 25, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  52. ^ a b "Good Charlotte Chart History (Top Catalog Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved February 24, 2018.
  53. ^ a b "Good Charlotte Chart History (Heatseekers Albums)". Billboard. Retrieved February 24, 2018.
  54. ^ a b "Good Charlotte Chart History (Billboard 200)". Billboard. Retrieved February 24, 2018.
  55. ^ a b "Charts.org.nz – Good Charlotte – Good Charlotte". Hung Medien. Retrieved February 24, 2018.
  56. ^ a b "Chart Log UK: Gina G – GZA". Zobbel. Archived from the original on July 18, 2012. Retrieved February 24, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  57. ^ a b "British album certifications – Good Charlotte – Good Charlotte". British Phonographic Industry. Select albums in the Format field. Select Silver in the Certification field. Type Good Charlotte in the "Search BPI Awards" field and then press Enter.
  58. ^ a b "American album certifications – Good Charlotte – Good Charlotte". Recording Industry Association of America. If necessary, click Advanced, then click Format, then select Album, then click SEARCH. 
  59. ^ "Good Charlotte Chart History (Mainstream Top 40)". Billboard. Lynne Segall. Archived from the original on February 24, 2018. Retrieved February 23, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  60. ^ "Good Charlotte Chart History (Alternative Songs)". Billboard. Lynne Segall. Archived from the original on May 9, 2018. Retrieved February 23, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  61. ^ "Pandora Archive" (PDF). Pandora.nla.gov.au. August 23, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 21, 2002. Retrieved July 17, 2016.
  62. ^ "Pandora Archive" (PDF). Pandora.nla.gov.au. August 23, 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on February 21, 2002. Retrieved July 17, 2016.
  63. ^ Greatest Hits (booklet). Good Charlotte. Epic/Daylight/Legacy Recordings/Sony Music Entertainment. 2010. 88697804372.CS1 maint: others (link)
  64. ^ Viruet, Pilot (November 15, 2017). "50 Greatest Pop-Punk Albums: 46. Good Charlotte, 'Good Charlotte' (2000)". Rolling Stone. Jann Wenner. Archived from the original on July 27, 2018. Retrieved July 27, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)
  65. ^ Travers 2016, p. 29
  66. ^ Dhindsa, Jasleen (July 14, 2016). "Good Charlotte: "It's kind of like riding a bike, we do what we do"". Upset. The Bunker Publishing. Archived from the original on February 23, 2018. Retrieved June 18, 2018. Cite uses deprecated parameter |dead-url= (help)

Sources

External links[edit]