Good old days

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Good old days is a saying in popular culture. It is used to reference a time in the past that is considered by the speaker to be better than the current era. It is a form of nostalgia. Nostalgia can be used in different ways such as remembering family members deriving from homesickness or nostalgia can involve yearning for long-gone moments.[1]

In 1726, John Henley used this phrase in his book The Primitive Liturgy: for the Use of the Oratory, Part 1. Being a form of Morning and Evening Prayer....[2]

In 1727, Daniel Defoe wrote "In the good old days of Trade, which our Fore-fathers plodded on in ...". This phrase was used in the book The Complete English Tradesman, Volume 1[3]. In this part of his book, Defoe talks about how in 'the good old days' tradesman had is better as opposed to now. "...to all honest Admirers of the good old Days of their best and wisest Fore-fathers, this first Part of the Primitive Liturgy Is most humbly dedicated"[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Nostalgic". 
  2. ^ a b Multiple., Contributors, (2010). Primitive liturgy : for the use of the oratory. part 1. being a form of morning and evening. [Place of publication not identified]: Gale Ecco, Print Editions. ISBN 9781170253939. OCLC 945379031. 
  3. ^ Defoe, Daniel (2008). The Complete English Tradesman. Charleston, South Carolina: BiblioLife. pp. 156–157. ISBN 0554343096.